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The City of Dreadful Night

Per me si va nella citta dolente.

--Dante

Poi di tanto adoprar, di tanti moti
D'ogni celeste, ogni terrena cosa,
Girando senza posa,
Per tornar sempre la donde son mosse;
Uso alcuno, alcun frutto
Indovinar non so.

Sola nel mondo eterna, a cui si volve
Ogni creata cosa,
In te, morte, si posa
Nostra ignuda natura;
Lieta no, ma sicura
Dell' antico dolor . . .
Pero ch' esser beato
Nega ai mortali e nega a' morti il fato.

--Leopardi

PROEM

Lo, thus, as prostrate, "In the dust I write
My heart's deep languor and my soul's sad tears."
Yet why evoke the spectres of black night
To blot the sunshine of exultant years?
Why disinter dead faith from mouldering hidden?
Why break the seals of mute despair unbidden,
And wail life's discords into careless ears?

Because a cold rage seizes one at whiles
To show the bitter old and wrinkled truth
Stripped naked of all vesture that beguiles,
False dreams, false hopes, false masks and modes of youth;
Because it gives some sense of power and passion
In helpless innocence to try to fashion
Our woe in living words howe'er uncouth.

Surely I write not for the hopeful young,
Or those who deem their happiness of worth,
Or such as pasture and grow fat among
The shows of life and feel nor doubt nor dearth,
Or pious spirits with a God above them
To sanctify and glorify and love them,
Or sages who foresee a heaven on earth.

For none of these I write, and none of these
Could read the writing if they deigned to try;

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Related quotes

Tu Vuoi Da Me Qualcosa

Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Sempre
Tu vuoi da me "che cosa"
Tu vuoi da me "che cosa"
Tu vuoi da me
Cosa ti Serve
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Sempre
Tu vuoi da me "che cosa"
Tu vuoi da me "che cosa"
Tu vuoi da me
Cosa ti Serve
Ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
Per esser felici per te
Ci vuole "un perch"
Non ti fidi mai
Non ci credi e lo sai
Vuoi qualcosa di pi
E dici che tu
Pretendi da me
Qualcosa che io
Non s!
Che cosa ?...
Che cosa vuoi?...
Che cosa...hai?....
Che cosa c'?....
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Tu vuoi da me qualcosa
Sempre
Tu vuoi da me "che cosa"
Tu vuoi da me "che cosa"
Tu vuoi da me
Cosa ti Serve
Ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
ti serve
Per esser felice per te

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Ogni Volta

E ogni volta che viene giorno
ogni volta che ritorno
ogni volta che cammino
e mi sembra di averti vicino
ogni volta che mi guardo intorno
ogni volta che non me ne accorgo
ogni volta che viene giorno.
E ogni volta che mi sveglio
ogni volta che mi sbaglio
ogni volta che sono sicuro
e ogni volta che mi sembra solo
ogni volta che mi viene in mente
qualche cosa che non c'entra niente
ogni volta...
E ogni volta che non sono coerente
e ogni volta che non importante
ogni volta che qualcuno si preoccupa per me
ogni volta che non c'
proprio quanto la stavo cercando
ogni volta...
ogni volta quando....
E ogni volta torna sera e la paura
e ogni volta torna sera e la paura....
E ogni volta che non c'entro
ogni volta che non sono stato
ogni volta che non guardo in faccia a niente
e ogni volta che dopo piango
ogni volta che rimango
con la testa tra le mani
e rimando tutto a domani.

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Con Voi

Mia cara, voglio farvi sapere

Qualcosa che è molto importante per me,

E qualcosa che può essere

Molto importante per lei,

Se apprezzi il mio amore solo

Come valore di tuo.

Mia cara, sono stato con voi per

Come posso ricordare.

Mi ricordo quando eravamo bambini,

E i nostri genitori erano vicini,

E siamo stati vicini, come pure,

Naturalmente

E i nostri genitori sarebbero pianificare 'gioco-date'

Come chiamati li allora e ancora adesso,

E c'era molto di più ad esso.

Si, tua sorella e tuo fratello sarebbe venuto sopra,

E potrebbe appendere fuori con mio fratello, mia sorella e me.

Ricordo che pensavo che le ragazze erano lorde,

E voi, vorrei evitare

E hai pensato che avevo una malattia,

Così sarebbe evitare me, troppo.

Ma, dopo un paio di settimane,

Siamo diventati amici,

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Donde Se Fueron?

Donde se fueron , por donde se iran
Donde se fueron , por donde se iran
se fueron para una rumba? para buscar la verdad
se fueron para una rumba para buscar la verdad
Cuando se fueron y donde estaran
Cuando se fueron y donde estaran
se fueron con los santeros para buscar la verdad
se fueron con los santeros para buscar la verdad
me voy a juntar con ellos hasta la madrugaa
me voy a juntar con ellos por que soy de yemalla
me voy a juntar con ellos hasta la madrugaa
me voy a juntar con ellos por que soy de yemalla
Donde se fueron , por donde se iran
Donde se fueron , por donde se iran
se fueron para una rumba? para buscar la verdad
se fueron para una rumba para buscar la verdad
Cuando se fueron y donde estaran
Cuando se fueron y donde estaran
se fueron con los santeros para buscar la verdad
se fueron con los santeros para buscar la verdad
me voy a juntar con ellos hasta la madrugaa
me voy a juntar con ellos por que soy de yemalla
me voy a juntar con ellos hasta la madrugaa
me voy a juntar con ellos por que soy de yemalla
Donde se fueron , por donde se iran (pero que donde)
Donde se fueron , y donde estaran (pero mira como ?
Donde se fueron , por donde se iran (pero que me va a juntar atoda la banda)
Donde se fueron , y donde estaran
pero donde ,pero donde, donde se fueron se fueron a bailar con ozomatli
Donde se fueron , por donde se iran
pero que, mira que ,pero que vamonos, pero que
va-mo -nos
para mambo,mambo pa mi mambo pa ti, mambo pa
todos que rico que ve
dedicado pa nuestros amigos cubanos

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Dante At Verona

Behold, even I, even I am Beatrice.
(Div. Com. Purg. xxx.)
OF Florence and of Beatrice
Servant and singer from of old,
O'er Dante's heart in youth had toll'd
The knell that gave his Lady peace;
And now in manhood flew the dart
Wherewith his City pierced his heart.
Yet if his Lady's home above
Was Heaven, on earth she filled his soul;
And if his City held control
To cast the body forth to rove,
The soul could soar from earth's vain throng,
And Heaven and Hell fulfil the song.
Follow his feet's appointed way;—
But little light we find that clears
The darkness of the exiled years.
Follow his spirit's journey:—nay,
What fires are blent, what winds are blown
On paths his feet may tread alone?
Yet of the twofold life he led
In chainless thought and fettered will
Some glimpses reach us,—somewhat still
Of the steep stairs and bitter bread,—
Of the soul's quest whose stern avow
For years had made him haggard now.
Alas! the Sacred Song whereto
Both heaven and earth had set their hand
Not only at Fame's gate did stand
Knocking to claim the passage through,
But toiled to ope that heavier door
Which Florence shut for evermore.
Shall not his birth's baptismal Town
One last high presage yet fulfil,
And at that font in Florence still
His forehead take the laurel-crown?
O God! or shall dead souls deny
The undying soul its prophecy?
Aye, 'tis their hour. Not yet forgot
The bitter words he spoke that day
When for some great charge far away
Her rulers his acceptance sought.
And if I go, who stays?”—so rose
His scorn:—“and if I stay, who goes?”
Lo! thou art gone now, and we stay
(The curled lips mutter): “and no star
Is from thy mortal path so far
As streets where childhood knew the way.
To Heaven and Hell thy feet may win,
But thine own house they come not in.”

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Christina Georgina Rossetti

Monna Innominata: A Sonnet of Sonnets

1

Lo dì che han detto a' dolci amici addio. - Dante
Amor, con quanto sforzo oggi mi vinci! - Petrarca

Come back to me, who wait and watch for you:--
Or come not yet, for it is over then,
And long it is before you come again,
So far between my pleasures are and few.
While, when you come not, what I do I do
Thinking "Now when he comes," my sweetest when:"
For one man is my world of all the men
This wide world holds; O love, my world is you.
Howbeit, to meet you grows almost a pang
Because the pang of parting comes so soon;
My hope hangs waning, waxing, like a moon
Between the heavenly days on which we meet:
Ah me, but where are now the songs I sang
When life was sweet because you call'd them sweet?

2

Era già 1'ora che volge il desio. - Dante
Ricorro al tempo ch' io vi vidi prima. - Petrarca

I wish I could remember that first day,
First hour, first moment of your meeting me,
If bright or dim the season, it might be
Summer or winter for aught I can say;
So unrecorded did it slip away,
So blind was I to see and to foresee,
So dull to mark the budding of my tree
That would not blossom yet for many a May.
If only I could recollect it, such
A day of days! I let it come and go
As traceless as a thaw of bygone snow;
It seem'd to mean so little, meant so much;
If only now I could recall that touch,
First touch of hand in hand--Did one but know!


3

O ombre vane, fuor che ne l'aspetto! - Dante
Immaginata guida la conduce. - Petrarca

I dream of you to wake: would that I might
Dream of you and not wake but slumber on;
Nor find with dreams the dear companion gone,
As summer ended summer birds take flight.

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Homer

The Iliad: Book 5

Then Pallas Minerva put valour into the heart of Diomed, son of
Tydeus, that he might excel all the other Argives, and cover himself
with glory. She made a stream of fire flare from his shield and helmet
like the star that shines most brilliantly in summer after its bath in
the waters of Oceanus- even such a fire did she kindle upon his head
and shoulders as she bade him speed into the thickest hurly-burly of
the fight.
Now there was a certain rich and honourable man among the Trojans,
priest of Vulcan, and his name was Dares. He had two sons, Phegeus and
Idaeus, both of them skilled in all the arts of war. These two came
forward from the main body of Trojans, and set upon Diomed, he being
on foot, while they fought from their chariot. When they were close up
to one another, Phegeus took aim first, but his spear went over
Diomed's left shoulder without hitting him. Diomed then threw, and his
spear sped not in vain, for it hit Phegeus on the breast near the
nipple, and he fell from his chariot. Idaeus did not dare to
bestride his brother's body, but sprang from the chariot and took to
flight, or he would have shared his brother's fate; whereon Vulcan
saved him by wrapping him in a cloud of darkness, that his old
father might not be utterly overwhelmed with grief; but the son of
Tydeus drove off with the horses, and bade his followers take them
to the ships. The Trojans were scared when they saw the two sons of
Dares, one of them in fright and the other lying dead by his
chariot. Minerva, therefore, took Mars by the hand and said, "Mars,
Mars, bane of men, bloodstained stormer of cities, may we not now
leave the Trojans and Achaeans to fight it out, and see to which of
the two Jove will vouchsafe the victory? Let us go away, and thus
avoid his anger."
So saying, she drew Mars out of the battle, and set him down upon
the steep banks of the Scamander. Upon this the Danaans drove the
Trojans back, and each one of their chieftains killed his man. First
King Agamemnon flung mighty Odius, captain of the Halizoni, from his
chariot. The spear of Agamemnon caught him on the broad of his back,
just as he was turning in flight; it struck him between the
shoulders and went right through his chest, and his armour rang
rattling round him as he fell heavily to the ground.
Then Idomeneus killed Phaesus, son of Borus the Meonian, who had
come from Varne. Mighty Idomeneus speared him on the right shoulder as
he was mounting his chariot, and the darkness of death enshrouded
him as he fell heavily from the car.
The squires of Idomeneus spoiled him of his armour, while
Menelaus, son of Atreus, killed Scamandrius the son of Strophius, a
mighty huntsman and keen lover of the chase. Diana herself had
taught him how to kill every kind of wild creature that is bred in
mountain forests, but neither she nor his famed skill in archery could
now save him, for the spear of Menelaus struck him in the back as he
was flying; it struck him between the shoulders and went right through
his chest, so that he fell headlong and his armour rang rattling round
him.
Meriones then killed Phereclus the son of Tecton, who was the son of

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Senza Parole

Ho guardato dentro una bugia
e ho capito che una malattia
dalla quale non si pu guarire...mai!
e ho cercato di convincermi che tu non ce l'hai
Ho guardato dentro casa tua
e ho capito che era una follia
aver pensato che fossi soltanto...mia
e ho cercato di dimenticare
di non guardare
E ho guardato la televisione
e mi venuta come l'impressione
che mi stessero rubando il tempo e che tu..
che tu mi rubi l'amore
ma poi ho camminato tanto e fuori
c'era un gran rumore
che non ho pi pensato a tutte queste cose
e ho guardato dentro un'emozione
e ci ho visto dentro tanto amore
che ho capito perch non si comanda il cuore
e va bene cos...senza parole
senza parole!!!
e va bene cos...senza parole
e va bene cos...
Ma guardando la televisione
mi venuta come l'impressione
che mi stessero rubando il tempo
e che tu che tu mi rubi l'amore
ma poi ho camminato tanto e fuori
c'era un grande sole
che non ho pi pensato a tutte queste cose
e va bene cos...senza parole
e va bene cos...senza parole
e va bene cos...senza parole
e va bene cos...senza parole
senza parole
e va bene cos...senza parole
senza parole
senza parole

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Tanto So Che Poi Mi Passa

(alexander / mogol)
Italian language song set to the music of everyday I have to cry
Tanto so che poi mi passa
Tanto so che poi mi passa
E se voglio quindi posso
Posso amare chi mi va
I know it wont last
I know it wont last
And if I want to then I can
I can love who I want
Ammetto che cos? lui mi piace tanto
Forte com con gli occhi da bambino
Mi dite perch? io dopo un minuto
Son convinta che mi sono proprio innamorata
I admit I like him a lot thay way
Strong as he is with his little boys eyes
Tell me why after one minute
Im convinced Im really in love
Tanto so che poi mi passa
Tanto so che poi mi passa
E se volgio quindi posso
Posso amare chi mi va
I know it wont last
I know it wont last
And if I want to then I can
I can love who I want
Se balli insieme a me quasi non respiro
Se dici coshai sorrido un poco amoro
Sapate com a prendere fuoco
Posso dire che ci metto molto molto poco
If you dance with me I almost cant breathe
If you ask me whats wrong I give a slightly bitter smile
Dont you know what its like to go head-over-heels?
It doesnt take much at all with me
Tanto so che poi mi passa
Tanto so che poi mi passa
E se volgio quindi posso
Posso amare chi mi va
I know it wont last
I know it wont last
And if I want to then I can
I can love who I want
Se balli insieme a me quasi non respiro
Se dici coshai sorrido un poco amoro
Sapate com a prendere fuoco
Posso dire che ci metto molto molto poco
If you dance with me I almost cant breathe
If you ask me whats wrong I give a slightly bitter smile
Dont you know what its like to go head-over-heels?
It doesnt take much at all with me

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Homer

The Iliad: Book 23

Thus did they make their moan throughout the city, while the
Achaeans when they reached the Hellespont went back every man to his
own ship. But Achilles would not let the Myrmidons go, and spoke to
his brave comrades saying, "Myrmidons, famed horsemen and my own
trusted friends, not yet, forsooth, let us unyoke, but with horse
and chariot draw near to the body and mourn Patroclus, in due honour
to the dead. When we have had full comfort of lamentation we will
unyoke our horses and take supper all of us here."
On this they all joined in a cry of wailing and Achilles led them in
their lament. Thrice did they drive their chariots all sorrowing round
the body, and Thetis stirred within them a still deeper yearning.
The sands of the seashore and the men's armour were wet with their
weeping, so great a minister of fear was he whom they had lost.
Chief in all their mourning was the son of Peleus: he laid his
bloodstained hand on the breast of his friend. "Fare well," he
cried, "Patroclus, even in the house of Hades. I will now do all
that I erewhile promised you; I will drag Hector hither and let dogs
devour him raw; twelve noble sons of Trojans will I also slay before
your pyre to avenge you."
As he spoke he treated the body of noble Hector with contumely,
laying it at full length in the dust beside the bier of Patroclus. The
others then put off every man his armour, took the horses from their
chariots, and seated themselves in great multitude by the ship of
the fleet descendant of Aeacus, who thereon feasted them with an
abundant funeral banquet. Many a goodly ox, with many a sheep and
bleating goat did they butcher and cut up; many a tusked boar
moreover, fat and well-fed, did they singe and set to roast in the
flames of Vulcan; and rivulets of blood flowed all round the place
where the body was lying.
Then the princes of the Achaeans took the son of Peleus to
Agamemnon, but hardly could they persuade him to come with them, so
wroth was he for the death of his comrade. As soon as they reached
Agamemnon's tent they told the serving-men to set a large tripod
over the fire in case they might persuade the son of Peleus 'to wash
the clotted gore from this body, but he denied them sternly, and swore
it with a solemn oath, saying, "Nay, by King Jove, first and mightiest
of all gods, it is not meet that water should touch my body, till I
have laid Patroclus on the flames, have built him a barrow, and shaved
my head- for so long as I live no such second sorrow shall ever draw
nigh me. Now, therefore, let us do all that this sad festival demands,
but at break of day, King Agamemnon, bid your men bring wood, and
provide all else that the dead may duly take into the realm of
darkness; the fire shall thus burn him out of our sight the sooner,
and the people shall turn again to their own labours."
Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said. They made haste
to prepare the meal, they ate, and every man had his full share so
that all were satisfied. As soon as they had had had enough to eat and
drink, the others went to their rest each in his own tent, but the son
of Peleus lay grieving among his Myrmidons by the shore of the
sounding sea, in an open place where the waves came surging in one

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Senza Una Donna

Non e' cosi' che passo i giorni Baby come stai
Sei stata li e adesso torni Lady Hey, con chi stai
Io sto qui e guardo il mare
sto con me, mi faccio anche da mangiare
si e' cosi', ridi pure, ma non ho piu' pauredi restare
senza una donna
come siamo lontani
senza una donnasto bene anche domani
senza una donna
che m'ha fatto morir
senza una donna
E' meglio cosi'
Non e' cosi' che puoi comprarmi Baby, tu lo sai
E' un po' piu' giu'
che devi andare lady Yes, se ce l'hai
io ce l'ho vuoi da bere
guardami sono un fiore
Be' non proprio cosi', ridi pure, ma
non ho piu' paure di restare
Senza una donna
come siamo lontani
senza una donna
sto bene anche domani
senza una donnache m'ha fatto morir.......
Io sto qui e guardo il mare
ma perche' continuo a parlare
non lo so ridi pure ma
non ho piu' paure di restare
Senza una donna
come siamo lontani
senza una donna
sto bene anche domani
senza una donna
che m'ha fatto morire
senza una donnavieni qui come on here
senza una donna
ora siamo vicini
senza una donna
sto bene anche domani
senza una donna
che m'ha fatto morir.

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Come Il Sole All'improvviso

Come il sole all'improvviso
Nel mondo io camminer
tanto che poi i piedi mi faranno male
io camminer un'altra volta
E a tutti domander
finch risposte non ce ne saranno pi
io domander un'altra volta
Amer in modo che il mio cuore
mi far tanto male che
male che come il sole all'improvviso
scoppier, scoppier...
Nel mondo io lavorer
tanto che poi le mani mi faranno male
io lavorer un'altra volta
Amer in modo che il mio cuore
mi far tanto male che
m ale che come il sole all'improvviso
scoppier, scoppier...
E nel mondo tutti io guarder
tanto che poi gli occhi mi faranno male
ancora guarder un'altra volta
Amer in modo che il mio cuore
mi far tanto male che
male che come il sole all'improvviso
scoppier, scoppier...
Nel mondo io non amer
tanto che poi il cuore non mi far male

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Homer

The Iliad: Book 2

Now the other gods and the armed warriors on the plain slept
soundly, but Jove was wakeful, for he was thinking how to do honour to
Achilles, and destroyed much people at the ships of the Achaeans. In
the end he deemed it would be best to send a lying dream to King
Agamemnon; so he called one to him and said to it, "Lying Dream, go to
the ships of the Achaeans, into the tent of Agamemnon, and say to
him word to word as I now bid you. Tell him to get the Achaeans
instantly under arms, for he shall take Troy. There are no longer
divided counsels among the gods; Juno has brought them to her own
mind, and woe betides the Trojans."
The dream went when it had heard its message, and soon reached the
ships of the Achaeans. It sought Agamemnon son of Atreus and found him
in his tent, wrapped in a profound slumber. It hovered over his head
in the likeness of Nestor, son of Neleus, whom Agamemnon honoured
above all his councillors, and said:-
"You are sleeping, son of Atreus; one who has the welfare of his
host and so much other care upon his shoulders should dock his
sleep. Hear me at once, for I come as a messenger from Jove, who,
though he be not near, yet takes thought for you and pities you. He
bids you get the Achaeans instantly under arms, for you shall take
Troy. There are no longer divided counsels among the gods; Juno has
brought them over to her own mind, and woe betides the Trojans at
the hands of Jove. Remember this, and when you wake see that it does
not escape you."
The dream then left him, and he thought of things that were,
surely not to be accomplished. He thought that on that same day he was
to take the city of Priam, but he little knew what was in the mind
of Jove, who had many another hard-fought fight in store alike for
Danaans and Trojans. Then presently he woke, with the divine message
still ringing in his ears; so he sat upright, and put on his soft
shirt so fair and new, and over this his heavy cloak. He bound his
sandals on to his comely feet, and slung his silver-studded sword
about his shoulders; then he took the imperishable staff of his
father, and sallied forth to the ships of the Achaeans.
The goddess Dawn now wended her way to vast Olympus that she might
herald day to Jove and to the other immortals, and Agamemnon sent
the criers round to call the people in assembly; so they called them
and the people gathered thereon. But first he summoned a meeting of
the elders at the ship of Nestor king of Pylos, and when they were
assembled he laid a cunning counsel before them.
"My friends," said he, "I have had a dream from heaven in the dead
of night, and its face and figure resembled none but Nestor's. It
hovered over my head and said, 'You are sleeping, son of Atreus; one
who has the welfare of his host and so much other care upon his
shoulders should dock his sleep. Hear me at once, for I am a messenger
from Jove, who, though he be not near, yet takes thought for you and
pities you. He bids you get the Achaeans instantly under arms, for you
shall take Troy. There are no longer divided counsels among the
gods; Juno has brought them over to her own mind, and woe betides
the Trojans at the hands of Jove. Remember this.' The dream then

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Homer

The Iliad: Book 13

Now when Jove had thus brought Hector and the Trojans to the
ships, he left them to their never-ending toil, and turned his keen
eyes away, looking elsewhither towards the horse-breeders of Thrace,
the Mysians, fighters at close quarters, the noble Hippemolgi, who
live on milk, and the Abians, justest of mankind. He no longer
turned so much as a glance towards Troy, for he did not think that any
of the immortals would go and help either Trojans or Danaans.
But King Neptune had kept no blind look-out; he had been looking
admiringly on the battle from his seat on the topmost crests of wooded
Samothrace, whence he could see all Ida, with the city of Priam and
the ships of the Achaeans. He had come from under the sea and taken
his place here, for he pitied the Achaeans who were being overcome
by the Trojans; and he was furiously angry with Jove.
Presently he came down from his post on the mountain top, and as
he strode swiftly onwards the high hills and the forest quaked beneath
the tread of his immortal feet. Three strides he took, and with the
fourth he reached his goal- Aegae, where is his glittering golden
palace, imperishable, in the depths of the sea. When he got there,
he yoked his fleet brazen-footed steeds with their manes of gold all
flying in the wind; he clothed himself in raiment of gold, grasped his
gold whip, and took his stand upon his chariot. As he went his way
over the waves the sea-monsters left their lairs, for they knew
their lord, and came gambolling round him from every quarter of the
deep, while the sea in her gladness opened a path before his
chariot. So lightly did the horses fly that the bronze axle of the car
was not even wet beneath it; and thus his bounding steeds took him
to the ships of the Achaeans.
Now there is a certain huge cavern in the depths of the sea midway
between Tenedos and rocky Imbrus; here Neptune lord of the
earthquake stayed his horses, unyoked them, and set before them
their ambrosial forage. He hobbled their feet with hobbles of gold
which none could either unloose or break, so that they might stay
there in that place until their lord should return. This done he
went his way to the host of the Achaeans.
Now the Trojans followed Hector son of Priam in close array like a
storm-cloud or flame of fire, fighting with might and main and raising
the cry battle; for they deemed that they should take the ships of the
Achaeans and kill all their chiefest heroes then and there.
Meanwhile earth-encircling Neptune lord of the earthquake cheered on
the Argives, for he had come up out of the sea and had assumed the
form and voice of Calchas.
First he spoke to the two Ajaxes, who were doing their best already,
and said, "Ajaxes, you two can be the saving of the Achaeans if you
will put out all your strength and not let yourselves be daunted. I am
not afraid that the Trojans, who have got over the wall in force, will
be victorious in any other part, for the Achaeans can hold all of them
in check, but I much fear that some evil will befall us here where
furious Hector, who boasts himself the son of great Jove himself, is
leading them on like a pillar of flame. May some god, then, put it
into your hearts to make a firm stand here, and to incite others to do

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Senza Una Donna - Without A Woman (feat. Paul Young)

This ain't the way, I spent my mornings baby
come stai?
you been with him, and now you come back my lady
hey, what's he like?
I just sit, and watch the ocean
with myself, even doing my own cookin'
you can laugh, you're forgiven
but I'm no longer frightened to be livin'
Senza una donna,...no more pain and no sorrow
Senza una donna,...I'll make it through tomorrow
Senza una donna,... givin' me torture and bliss
without a woman,...better like this
There is no way, that you can buy me baby
don't make fun
you got to dig, a little deeper baby (in the heart?)
yeah, if you have one
Here's my heart, feel the power
look at me, I'm a flower
you can laugh, you're forgiven
but I'm no longer frightened to be livin'
Senza una donna,...no more pain and no sorrow
Senza una donna,...I'll make it through tomorrow
Senza una donna,... givin' me torture and bliss
ohh i stay here, and watch the ocean
don't know why, I keep on talkin'
you may laugh, you're forgiven
but I'm no longer frightened (maybe) to be livin'
Senza una donna,...no more pain and no sorrow
Senza una donna,...I'll make it through tomorrow
Senza una donna,... givin' me torture and bliss
Without a woman,...vieni qui! come on in
Senza una donna,...I don't know what might follow
Senza una donna,...oh, maybe from tomorrow
Senza una donna,...givin' me torture and bliss

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Homer

The Iliad: Book 16

Thus did they fight about the ship of Protesilaus. Then Patroclus
drew near to Achilles with tears welling from his eyes, as from some
spring whose crystal stream falls over the ledges of a high precipice.
When Achilles saw him thus weeping he was sorry for him and said,
"Why, Patroclus, do you stand there weeping like some silly child that
comes running to her mother, and begs to be taken up and carried-
she catches hold of her mother's dress to stay her though she is in
a hurry, and looks tearfully up until her mother carries her- even
such tears, Patroclus, are you now shedding. Have you anything to
say to the Myrmidons or to myself? or have you had news from Phthia
which you alone know? They tell me Menoetius son of Actor is still
alive, as also Peleus son of Aeacus, among the Myrmidons- men whose
loss we two should bitterly deplore; or are you grieving about the
Argives and the way in which they are being killed at the ships, throu
their own high-handed doings? Do not hide anything from me but tell me
that both of us may know about it."
Then, O knight Patroclus, with a deep sigh you answered,
"Achilles, son of Peleus, foremost champion of the Achaeans, do not be
angry, but I weep for the disaster that has now befallen the
Argives. All those who have been their champions so far are lying at
the ships, wounded by sword or spear. Brave Diomed son of Tydeus has
been hit with a spear, while famed Ulysses and Agamemnon have received
sword-wounds; Eurypylus again has been struck with an arrow in the
thigh; skilled apothecaries are attending to these heroes, and healing
them of their wounds; are you still, O Achilles, so inexorable? May it
never be my lot to nurse such a passion as you have done, to the
baning of your own good name. Who in future story will speak well of
you unless you now save the Argives from ruin? You know no pity;
knight Peleus was not your father nor Thetis your mother, but the grey
sea bore you and the sheer cliffs begot you, so cruel and
remorseless are you. If however you are kept back through knowledge of
some oracle, or if your mother Thetis has told you something from
the mouth of Jove, at least send me and the Myrmidons with me, if I
may bring deliverance to the Danaans. Let me moreover wear your
armour; the Trojans may thus mistake me for you and quit the field, so
that the hard-pressed sons of the Achaeans may have breathing time-
which while they are fighting may hardly be. We who are fresh might
soon drive tired men back from our ships and tents to their own city."
He knew not what he was asking, nor that he was suing for his own
destruction. Achilles was deeply moved and answered, "What, noble
Patroclus, are you saying? I know no prophesyings which I am
heeding, nor has my mother told me anything from the mouth of Jove,
but I am cut to the very heart that one of my own rank should dare
to rob me because he is more powerful than I am. This, after all
that I have gone through, is more than I can endure. The girl whom the
sons of the Achaeans chose for me, whom I won as the fruit of my spear
on having sacked a city- her has King Agamemnon taken from me as
though I were some common vagrant. Still, let bygones be bygones: no
man may keep his anger for ever; I said I would not relent till battle
and the cry of war had reached my own ships; nevertheless, now gird my

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Homer

The Iliad: Book 17

Brave Menelaus son of Atreus now came to know that Patroclus had
fallen, and made his way through the front ranks clad in full armour
to bestride him. As a cow stands lowing over her first calf, even so
did yellow-haired Menelaus bestride Patroclus. He held his round
shield and his spear in front of him, resolute to kill any who
should dare face him. But the son of Panthous had also noted the body,
and came up to Menelaus saying, "Menelaus, son of Atreus, draw back,
leave the body, and let the bloodstained spoils be. I was first of the
Trojans and their brave allies to drive my spear into Patroclus, let
me, therefore, have my full glory among the Trojans, or I will take
aim and kill you."
To this Menelaus answered in great anger "By father Jove, boasting
is an ill thing. The pard is not more bold, nor the lion nor savage
wild-boar, which is fiercest and most dauntless of all creatures, than
are the proud sons of Panthous. Yet Hyperenor did not see out the days
of his youth when he made light of me and withstood me, deeming me the
meanest soldier among the Danaans. His own feet never bore him back to
gladden his wife and parents. Even so shall I make an end of you
too, if you withstand me; get you back into the crowd and do not
face me, or it shall be worse for you. Even a fool may be wise after
the event."
Euphorbus would not listen, and said, "Now indeed, Menelaus, shall
you pay for the death of my brother over whom you vaunted, and whose
wife you widowed in her bridal chamber, while you brought grief
unspeakable on his parents. I shall comfort these poor people if I
bring your head and armour and place them in the hands of Panthous and
noble Phrontis. The time is come when this matter shall be fought
out and settled, for me or against me."
As he spoke he struck Menelaus full on the shield, but the spear did
not go through, for the shield turned its point. Menelaus then took
aim, praying to father Jove as he did so; Euphorbus was drawing
back, and Menelaus struck him about the roots of his throat, leaning
his whole weight on the spear, so as to drive it home. The point
went clean through his neck, and his armour rang rattling round him as
he fell heavily to the ground. His hair which was like that of the
Graces, and his locks so deftly bound in bands of silver and gold,
were all bedrabbled with blood. As one who has grown a fine young
olive tree in a clear space where there is abundance of water- the
plant is full of promise, and though the winds beat upon it from every
quarter it puts forth its white blossoms till the blasts of some
fierce hurricane sweep down upon it and level it with the ground- even
so did Menelaus strip the fair youth Euphorbus of his armour after
he had slain him. Or as some fierce lion upon the mountains in the
pride of his strength fastens on the finest heifer in a herd as it
is feeding- first he breaks her neck with his strong jaws, and then
gorges on her blood and entrails; dogs and shepherds raise a hue and
cry against him, but they stand aloof and will not come close to
him, for they are pale with fear- even so no one had the courage to
face valiant Menelaus. The son of Atreus would have then carried off
the armour of the son of Panthous with ease, had not Phoebus Apollo

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Nella Casa C'era

Nella casa c'era
Una stanza per la sera
Piena di pazienza di perdono e di onest
E tu sei andata via chiss
Dentro quali giorni sei gi, si
Sei andata via!
Nella casa c'era
Una stanza per gli amici
Piena di risate di parole e di allegria
E tu sei andata via chiss
Persa in quali giorni sei gi, si
Sei andata via!
Ogni storia ha i suoi no
Ed ogni storia ha i suoi guai oh
Ogni storia ha i suoi giorni
L'estate cieca e poi si sa,
Lunghi inverni perch sei andata via
Senza me!
Nella casa c'era
Una stanza da lasciare
Piena di rancore di silenzi e malinconia
E tu sei andata via (Randy)
Oh dove sei (Randy), si
Sei andata via!
Ogni storia ha i suoi no
Ed ogni storia ha i suoi guai
Ogni storia ha i suoi giorni
L'estate cieca e poi si sa,
Lunghi inverni e tu sei andata via
Come me

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Homer

The Iliad: Book 11

And now as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus, harbinger of
light alike to mortals and immortals, Jove sent fierce Discord with
the ensign of war in her hands to the ships of the Achaeans. She
took her stand by the huge black hull of Ulysses' ship which was
middlemost of all, so that her voice might carry farthest on either
side, on the one hand towards the tents of Ajax son of Telamon, and on
the other towards those of Achilles- for these two heroes,
well-assured of their own strength, had valorously drawn up their
ships at the two ends of the line. There she took her stand, and
raised a cry both loud and shrill that filled the Achaeans with
courage, giving them heart to fight resolutely and with all their
might, so that they had rather stay there and do battle than go home
in their ships.
The son of Atreus shouted aloud and bade the Argives gird themselves
for battle while he put on his armour. First he girded his goodly
greaves about his legs, making them fast with ankle clasps of
silver; and about his chest he set the breastplate which Cinyras had
once given him as a guest-gift. It had been noised abroad as far as
Cyprus that the Achaeans were about to sail for Troy, and therefore he
gave it to the king. It had ten courses of dark cyanus, twelve of
gold, and ten of tin. There were serpents of cyanus that reared
themselves up towards the neck, three upon either side, like the
rainbows which the son of Saturn has set in heaven as a sign to mortal
men. About his shoulders he threw his sword, studded with bosses of
gold; and the scabbard was of silver with a chain of gold wherewith to
hang it. He took moreover the richly-dight shield that covered his
body when he was in battle- fair to see, with ten circles of bronze
running all round see, wit it. On the body of the shield there were
twenty bosses of white tin, with another of dark cyanus in the middle:
this last was made to show a Gorgon's head, fierce and grim, with Rout
and Panic on either side. The band for the arm to go through was of
silver, on which there was a writhing snake of cyanus with three heads
that sprang from a single neck, and went in and out among one another.
On his head Agamemnon set a helmet, with a peak before and behind, and
four plumes of horse-hair that nodded menacingly above it; then he
grasped two redoubtable bronze-shod spears, and the gleam of his
armour shot from him as a flame into the firmament, while Juno and
Minerva thundered in honour of the king of rich Mycene.
Every man now left his horses in charge of his charioteer to hold
them in readiness by the trench, while he went into battle on foot
clad in full armour, and a mighty uproar rose on high into the
dawning. The chiefs were armed and at the trench before the horses got
there, but these came up presently. The son of Saturn sent a portent
of evil sound about their host, and the dew fell red with blood, for
he was about to send many a brave man hurrying down to Hades.
The Trojans, on the other side upon the rising slope of the plain,
were gathered round great Hector, noble Polydamas, Aeneas who was
honoured by the Trojans like an immortal, and the three sons of
Antenor, Polybus, Agenor, and young Acamas beauteous as a god.
Hector's round shield showed in the front rank, and as some baneful

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My Redemption Poem

When satan fell,
for one wrong mistake.
He was thrown in hell,
it was all he could take.
For there was still light in him,
but with it was now doubt.
Upon his face grew a grin,
all he did was rage and shout.
He yelled to God 'Why did it have to be me? ',
but he didnt answer,
and satan did see.
That hell was his to rule,
with unimaginable pain,
he would truly be cruel.
To all the lost souls,
he was their Dark King.
With their blood in his bowl,
in their pain,
for him they would sing.
Over the eons he became insane,
but there was still light in him.
Hidden in a deep part of his soul,
a place he forgot to know.
And one day their blood spilled out of the bowl,
he felt something stir.
A sadness so deep,
with a pain so true.
He could never sleep,
so the pain was all he could know.
As he sat there,
with tears in his eyes,
he thought noone was there,
noone to hear his cries.
He heard a voice,
and this is what it said 'Son why do you cry? '
He couldnt believe what he heard,
and was voiceless.
God said 'Son your here by your own choice'.
And with that he felt,
in numerous times,
all the pain he had delt.
And now he seen,
that little light,
he could find that little gleam.
He fell to his knees,
for all to see.
He prayed to God,
saying 'Father can i be saved? '.
'Am i doomed to live a life in this darkness? '.
And God said to satan 'My son all you had to do was accept your choice',

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