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When I Think About You

When I wake up in the morning time and see the sun I say
Hallelujah, thank you Jesus for waking me up today
I think about his goodness and the wonderful things he's done;
Forgiving me, setting me free and casting my sins away
And soon as I was about to fall you stepped right in on time
Picked me up, and let me know you had nothing but love for me
And those lonely nights when I thought that I gonna lose my mind (my mind)
Lord, You were my company
And now I feel joy (when I think about you)
I feel strength (when I think about you)
No pain (when I think about you)
And no rain (when I think about you)
I get glad (when I think about you)
And raise my hands (when I think about you)
Shout your name (when I think about you)
(When I think about you)
And in the midst of the storm you were the shelter in my life
Even though (I was doing wrong) and even though (I fell off)
No-one can help me out, the way you helped me whenever I was in need
When trouble was chasing, I was weak (mmm) you kept your hands on me
My God you sacrifised you life that I might live for eternity
Despite my faults, you heard my cry (yes you did) and forgave my inequity
No-one can understand, the way you understand when it comes to my heart
Lord you gave me a brand new start
And now I feel joy (when I think about you)
Feel strength (when I think about you)
There is no pain (when I think about you)
No rain (when I think about you)
I get glad (when I think about you)
Raise my hands (when I think about you)
And shout your name (when I think about you) Oh Lord
(When I think about you)
Listen
Even though your doubts will come (doubts will come)
Believe he gave his only son (all of the world) to all the world
He chose to love (oh, yes he did) so how can we not (how can we not) send our praises up
I feel joy (when I think about you)
Feel strength, yeah (when I think about you)
There's no rain (when I think about you)
No more pain (when I think about you)
I get glad, ohh (when I think about you)
Then I raise my hands (when I think about you)
Shout your name (when I think about you) oh I
(When I think about you)
I feel joy (when I think about you)
And peace (when I think about you)
Feel your presence (when I think about you)
Coming over me (when I think about you)
Then I start to fall, yeah (when I think about you)
Down to my knees (when I think about you)
And begin to pray (when I think about you) Lord help me
(When I think about you)
Then I see the light (when I think about you)
Startin' to shine right through (when I think about you)
It's a brand new day (when I think about you)
And my heart's renewed (when I think about you)
And all my fears are gone (when I think about you)
Away (when I think about you)
When my day looks cloudy (when I think about you)
It's gonna be okay (When I think about you)
Yeah-ohh-no (when I think about you)
(When I think about you)
How you gave me love (gave me love) (when I think about you)
And I gave you nothing (gave you nothing) (when I think about you)
How you woke me up (hey!) (when I think about you)
And started me on my way (started me on my way) (when I think about you)
See you did not have to do it (when I think about you)
But you did it any old way (when I think about you)
Any old, any old, any old way (when I think about you)
Yes you did, yes you did (when I think about you)
Yes you did, yes you did (when I think about you)
Yes you did, (when I think about you)
Hey-hey-hey-hey (when I think about you)
Hey-hey-hey-hey (when I think about you)
Hey-hey-hey-hey (when I think about you)
Hey-hey-hey whoo
Oh yes (uh) (when I think about you)
(When I think about you)
(When I think about you)
(When I think about you)

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The Winter Rain Can't Feel The Pain

THE WINTER RAIN CAN’T FEEL THE PAIN

The winter rain can’t feel the pain
The sky is not the sky again
We live and die
Remain the same -
The winter rain can’t feel the pain.

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I See Tears In Jesus's Eyes

While passing a tavern,
I see the hungry eye;
For food he does yearn,
Although he can not buy.
In tattered, ragged cloth,
He begs for pin money;
I manage my stored wrath,
Feel lone among many.

I then see tears in His eyes.


When I see a street-boy,
Starving without a roof;
Vanishes my life's joy.
Does soulful heart need proof,
To show Lord is in tears?


When a fanatic,
Attacks humanity
Stunned I remain static
Crying fraternity.

I see tears in Jesus' eyes!

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As You Feel The Pain At The Side Of Your Abdomen

i see what you are seeing, you are always telling me.
your fingers feel the pain. your eyes speak.
you take a little time. taking a look at the side of things.
you see some worms. a dead dog. a rat rotting on the road.
the rain has come for days. flood runs.
the sun comes. everything dries up.
the flowers wilt. this time you rise from your bed
to be alive for once.

you see ghosts. i see them too.
white ghosts floating on the window railings.
i call them clouds. outbursts of light.
the moon. and that stars.

denial. the images of denial come like some petals
of rain. red petals. orange leaves.

they come to you like naked children.
they grow to be men, naked men, these truths, they are like
the ten sculptures of david.

denial. you are talking of something else.
it is not pain. it is happiness. you like more of it.

yet the irony is, you are about to leave. the black car is waiting.
and they are ready with their dresses and flowers and prayers.

just as life has become beautiful
the end of the story comes. happy ending.

that is what you want. happy.

ending. sometimes, i feel so disgusted, why the young
useful and well-loved people always have to leave

there was no time enough to really meet them.
i am crying.

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Wake Up Time

You follow your feelings, you follow your d reams
You follow the leader into the trees
And whats in there waiting, neither one of us knows
You gotta keep one eye open the further you go
You never dreamed youd go down on one knee, but now
Who could have seen, youd be so hard t o please somehow
You feel like a poor boy, a long way from home
Youre just a poor boy, a long way from home
And its wake up time
Time to open up your eyes
And rise and shine
You spend you life dreaming, running around in a trance
You hang out forever and still miss the dance
And if you get lucky, you might find someone
To help you get over the pain that will come
Yeah, you were so cool back in high school, what happened
You were sure not to have your spirits dampened
But youre just a poor boy alone in this world
Youre just a poor boy alone in this world
And its wake up time
Time to open up your eyes
And rise and shine
Well, if he gets lucky, a boy finds a girl
T o help him to shoulder the pain in this world
And if you follow your feelings and you follow your dreams
You might find the forest there in the trees
Yeah, youll be alright, its gonna take time, but now
Who could have seen youd be so ha rd to please somehow
Youre just a poor boy, a long way from home
Youre just a poor boy, a long way from home
And its wake up time
Time to open up your eyes
And rise and shine
Cause its wake up time
Time to open up your eyes
And rise and shine

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The Birth And Death Of Pain

A Poem Read October Sixteenth, Mdcccxcvi, At The Commemoration Of The Fiftieth Anniversary Of The First Public Demonstration Of Surgical Anæsthesia In The Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston


FORGIVE a moment, if a friend's regret
Delay the task your honoring kindness set.
I miss one face to all men ever dear;
I miss one voice that all men loved to hear.
How glad were I to sit with you apart,
Could the dead master* use his higher art
To lift on wings of ever-lightsome mirth
The burdened muse above the dust of earth,
To stamp with jests the heavy ore of thought,
To give a day with proud remembrance fraught,
The vital pathos of that Holmes-spun art
Which knew so well to reach the common heart!
Alas! for me, for you, that fatal hour!
Gone is the master! Ah! not mine the power
To gild with jests that almost win a tear
The thronging memories that are with us here.

The Birth of Pain! Let centuries roll away;
Come back with me to nature's primal day.
What mighty forces pledged the dust to life!
What awful will decreed its silent strife,
Till through vast ages rose on hill and plain
Life's saddest voice, the birthright wail of pain!
The keener sense and ever-growing mind
Served but to add a torment twice refined,
As life, more tender as it grew more sweet,
The cruel links of sorrow found complete
When yearning love, to conscious pity grown,
Felt the mad pain-thrills that were not its own.

What will implacable, beyond our ken,
Set this stern fiat for the tribes of men?
This none shall 'scape who share our human fates:
One stern democracy of anguish waits
By poor men's cots, within the rich man's gates.
What purpose hath it? Nay, thy quest is vain:
Earth hath no answer. If the baffled brain
Cries, 'T is to warn, to punish!—ah, refrain.
When writhes the child beneath the surgeon's hand,
What soul shall hope that pain to understand?
Lo! Science falters o'er the hopeless task,
And Love and Faith in vain an answer ask,
When thrilling nerves demand what good is wrought
Where torture clogs the very source of thought.

Lo! Mercy, ever broadening down the years,
Seeks but to count a lessening sum of tears.
The rack is gone; the torture-chamber lies
A sorry show for shuddering tourist eyes.
How useless pain both Church and State have learned
Since the last witch or patient martyr burned.
Yet still, forever, he who strove to gain
By swift despatch a shorter lease for pain
Saw the grim theatre, and 'neath his knife
Felt the keen torture in the quivering life.
A word for him who, silent, grave, serene,
The thought-stirred actor on that tragic scene,
Recorded pity through the hand of skill,
Heard not a cry, but, ever conscious, still
In mercy merciless, swift, bold, intent,
Felt the slow moment that in torture went
While 'neath his touch, as none to-day has seen,
In anguish shook life's agonized machine.
The task is o'er; the precious blood is stayed;
But double price the hour of tension paid.
A pitying hand is on the sufferer's brow—
'Thank God, 't is over!' Few who face me now
Recall this memory. Let the curtain fall;
Far gladder days shall know this storied hall!

Though Science, patient as the fruitful years,
Still taught our art to close some fount of tears,
Yet who that served this sacred home of pain
Could e'er have dreamed one scarce-imagined gain,
Or hoped a day would bring his feartful art
No need to steel the ever-kindly heart?

So, fled the years! while haply here or there
Some trust delusive left the old despair;
Some comet thought flashed fitful through the night,
Prophetic promise of the coming light;
Then radiant morning broke, and amplet hope
To art and science gave illumined scope.

What angel bore the Christlike gift inspired!
What love divine with noblest courage fired
One eager soul that paid in bitter tears
For the glad helping of unnumbered fears,
From the strange record of creation tore
The sentence sad each sorrowing mother bore,
Struck from the roll of pangs one awful sum,
Made pain a dream, and suffering gently dumb!
Whatever triumphs still shall hold the mind,
Whatever gift shall yet enrich mankind,
Ah! here no hour shall strike through all the years,
No hour as sweet as when hope, doubt, and fears,
'Mid deeping stillness, watched one eager brain,
With Godlike will, decree the Death of Pain.

How did we thank him? Ah! no joy-bells rang,
No pæans greeted, and no poet sang;
No cannon thundered from the guarded strand
This mighty victory to a grateful land!
We took the gift so humbly, simply given,
And, coldly selfish—left our debt to Heaven.
How shall we thank him? Hush! A gladder hour
Has struck for him; a wiser, juster power
Shall know full well how fitly to reward
The generous soul that found the world so hard.

Oh, fruitful Mother, you whose thronging States
Shall deal not vainly with man's changing fates,
Of free-born thought or war's heroic deeds,
Much have your proud hands given, but naught exceeds
This heaven-sent answer to the cry of prayer,
This priceless gift which all mankind may share.

A solemn hour for such as gravely pause
To note the process of creation's laws!
Ah, surely, He whose dark, unfathomed mind
With prescient thought the scheme of life designed,
Who bade His highest creature slowly rise,
Spurred by sad needs and lured by many a prize,
Saw with a God's pure joy His ripening plan,
His highest mercy brought by man to man.

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Early In The Morning When The Sun Just Appears

Early in the morning
when the sun just appears over the hillocks,
when the guinea fowl call from the field,
then I see him
with his crooked walking stick chewing biltong
and the morning is dumb,
pure like an angel is his company;
before he disappears between the green maize stalks.

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Haiti I Feel Your Pain

My heart is as empty as a cave
My eyes are drier that a dry lake
Standing in the middle of sadness
My faith will turn into hope

Seeing everyone in pain
Makes me have pain
Pain equals sorrow
Sorrow is a nightmare i have at night

Haiti I feel your pain
But time will heel your pain
Just let it out
And let people know

Take negative thoughts
and make them positive
Tell me what you want
and hope and help will be on its way

Close your eyes and count to ten
everything will be okaii

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I Feel Your Pain

I don't know why
But I feel your pain
Maybe because I too
Was left out in the rain
The rain of life
That drains the soul
Leaving nothing
But a big empty hole
You try and try
With all your might
To fill it up
Grabbing at anything that might
Make you feel whole again
Then you realize after all of the pain
That God wasn't the one
That made you feel the pain
It was the people all around you
That made you feel that way
For the God I know is a loving God
Forgiving not hurtful God
Giving of His love

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I Feel Your Pain

I feel your pain
The pain in losing someone so close to us,
The pain in losing someone so dear to us
Knowing that they were just right here with us
I feel your pain. We never really say good-bye
Just I’ll see you home some day soon.
The pain to us that any time or any day that
Any time or any day that our love ones do not have long
to stay
I feel your pain the pain in knowing this has
Happened to you. The pain in knowing what more
tears we have gained. But through all this I feel your pain

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Morning Time

Wind was blowing through the trees
I could hear the rustling of their leaves
The morning sun sneaking through the clouds
Birds singing morning sounds
For i love this time i say
Morning of a new day
I wonder what the day has in store
In the distance i hear the waves crashing the shore
For it is morning time and all is a buzz
From the depths of the oceans
To the skies above
Good morning morning i always say
My your a beautiful day
Maybe you might rain today
Your still beautiful anyway
The sombre breeze that blows around
The birds singing
As i spread my blanket on the ground
So i lay here looking into the sky
Motionless waiting and watching the world pass me by
A few drops of rain speckle my face
I would not give up being here for any place

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Tale XX

THE BROTHERS.

Than old George Fletcher, on the British coast
Dwelt not a seaman who had more to boast:
Kind, simple and sincere--he seldom spoke,
But sometimes sang and chorus'd--'Hearts of Oak:'
In dangers steady, with his lot content,
His days in labour and in love were spent.
He left a Son so like him, that the old
With joy exclaim'd, ''Tis Fletcher we behold;'
But to his Brother, when the kinsmen came
And view'd his form, they grudged the father's

name.
George was a bold, intrepid, careless lad,
With just the failings that his father had;
Isaac was weak, attentive, slow, exact,
With just the virtues that his father lack'd.
George lived at sea: upon the land a guest -
He sought for recreation, not for rest;
While, far unlike, his brother's feebler form
Shrank from the cold, and shudder'd at the storm;
Still with the Seaman's to connect his trade,
The boy was bound where blocks and ropes were made.
George, strong and sturdy, had a tender mind,
And was to Isaac pitiful and kind;
A very father, till his art was gain'd,
And then a friend unwearied he remain'd;
He saw his brother was of spirit low,
His temper peevish, and his motions slow;
Not fit to bustle in a world, or make
Friends to his fortune for his merit's sake;
But the kind sailor could not boast the art
Of looking deeply in the human heart;
Else had he seen that this weak brother knew
What men to court--what objects to pursue;
That he to distant gain the way discern'd,
And none so crooked but his genius learn'd.
Isaac was poor, and this the brother felt;
He hired a house, and there the Landman dwelt,
Wrought at his trade, and had an easy home,
For there would George with cash and comforts come;
And when they parted, Isaac look'd around
Where other friends and helpers might be found.
He wish'd for some port-place, and one might

fall,
He wisely thought, if he should try for all;
He had a vote--and were it well applied,
Might have its worth--and he had views beside;
Old Burgess Steel was able to promote
An humble man who served him with a vote;
For Isaac felt not what some tempers feel,
But bow'd and bent the neck to Burgess Steel;
And great attention to a lady gave,
His ancient friend, a maiden spare and grave;
One whom the visage long and look demure
Of Isaac pleased--he seem'd sedate and pure;
And his soft heart conceived a gentle flame
For her who waited on this virtuous dame.
Not an outrageous love, a scorching fire,
But friendly liking and chastised desire;
And thus he waited, patient in delay,
In present favour and in fortune's way.
George then was coasting--war was yet delay'd,
And what he gain'd was to his brother paid;
Nor ask'd the Seaman what he saved or spent,
But took his grog, wrought hard, and was content;
Till war awaked the land, and George began
To think what part became a useful man:
'Press'd, I must go: why, then, 'tis better far
At once to enter like a British tar,
Than a brave captain and the foe to shun,
As if I fear'd the music of a gun.'
'Go not!' said Isaac--'you shall wear disguise.'
'What!' said the Seaman, 'clothe myself with lies!'
'Oh! but there's danger.'--'Danger in the fleet?
You cannot mean, good brother, of defeat;
And other dangers I at land must share -
So now adieu! and trust a brother's care.'
Isaac awhile demurr'd--but, in his heart,
So might he share, he was disposed to part:
The better mind will sometimes feel the pain
Of benefactions--favour is a chain;
But they the feeling scorn, and what they wish,

disdain;
While beings form'd in coarser mould will hate
The helping hand they ought to venerate:
No wonder George should in this cause prevail,
With one contending who was glad to fail:
'Isaac, farewell! do wipe that doleful eye;
Crying we came, and groaning we may die;
Let us do something 'twixt the groan and cry:
And hear me, brother, whether pay or prize,
One half to thee I give and I devise;
Por thou hast oft occasion for the aid
Of learn'd physicians, and they will be paid;
Their wives and children men support at sea,
And thou, my lad, art wife and child to me:
Farewell! I go where hope and honour call,
Nor does it follow that who fights must fall,'
Isaac here made a poor attempt to speak,
And a huge tear moved slowly down his cheek;
Like Pluto's iron drop, hard sign of grace,
It slowly roll'd upon the rueful face,
Forced by the striving will alone its way to trace.
Years fled--war lasted--George at sea remain'd,
While the slow Landman still his profits gain'd:
An humble place was vacant--he besought
His patron's interest, and the office caught;
For still the Virgin was his faithful friend,
And one so sober could with truth commend,
Who of his own defects most humbly thought,
And their advice with zeal and reverence sought:
Whom thus the Mistress praised, the Maid approved,
And her he wedded whom he wisely loved.
No more he needs assistance--but, alas!
He fears the money will for liquor pass;
Or that the Seaman might to flatterers lend,
Or give support to some pretended friend:
Still he must write--he wrote, and he confess'd
That, till absolved, he should be sore distress'd;
But one so friendly would, he thought, forgive
The hasty deed--Heav'n knew how he should live;
'But you,' he added, 'as a man of sense,
Have well consider'd danger and expense:
I ran, alas! into the fatal snare,
And now for trouble must my mind prepare;
And how, with children, I shall pick my way
Through a hard world, is more than I can say:
Then change not, Brother, your more happy state,
Or on the hazard long deliberate.'
George answered gravely, 'It is right and fit,
In all our crosses, humbly to submit:
Your apprehensions are unwise, unjust;
Forbear repining, and expel distrust.'
He added, 'Marriage was the joy of life,'
And gave his service to his brother's wife;
Then vow'd to bear in all expense a part,
And thus concluded, 'Have a cheerful heart.'
Had the glad Isaac been his brother's guide,
In the same terms the Seaman had replied;
At such reproofs the crafty Landman smiled,
And softly said, 'This creature is a child.'
Twice had the gallant ship a capture made -
And when in port the happy crew were paid,
Home went the Sailor, with his pockets stored,
Ease to enjoy, and pleasure to afford;
His time was short, joy shone in every face,
Isaac half fainted in the fond embrace:
The wife resolved her honour'd guest to please,
The children clung upon their uncle's knees;
The grog went round, the neighbours drank his

health,
And George exclaimed, 'Ah! what to this is wealth?
Better,' said he, 'to bear a loving heart,
Than roll in riches--but we now must part!'
All yet is still--but hark! the winds o'ersweep
The rising waves, and howl upon the deep;
Ships late becalm'd on mountain-billows ride -
So life is threaten'd and so man is tried.
Ill were the tidings that arrived from sea,
The worthy George must now a cripple be:
His leg was lopp'd; and though his heart was sound,
Though his brave captain was with glory crown'd,
Yet much it vex'd him to repose on shore,
An idle log, and be of use no more:
True, he was sure that Isaac would receive
All of his Brother that the foe might leave;
To whom the Seaman his design had sent,
Ere from the port the wounded hero went:
His wealth and expectations told, he 'knew
Wherein they fail'd, what Isaac's love would do;
That he the grog and cabin would supply,
Where George at anchor during life would lie.'
The Landman read--and, reading, grew distress'd:

-
'Could he resolve t'admit so poor a guest?
Better at Greenwich might the Sailor stay,
Unless his purse could for his comforts pay.'
So Isaac judged, and to his wife appealed,
But yet acknowledged it was best to yield:
'Perhaps his pension, with what sums remain
Due or unsquander'd, may the man maintain;
Refuse we must not.'--With a heavy sigh
The lady heard, and made her kind reply: -
'Nor would I wish it, Isaac, were we sure
How long this crazy building will endure;
Like an old house, that every day appears
About to fall, he may be propp'd for years;
For a few months, indeed, we might comply,
But these old batter'd fellows never die.'
The hand of Isaac, George on entering took,
With love and resignation in his look;
Declared his comfort in the fortune past,
And joy to find his anchor safely cast:
'Call then my nephews, let the grog be brought,
And I will tell them how the ship was fought.'
Alas! our simple Seaman should have known
That all the care, the kindness, he had shown,
Were from his Brother's heart, if not his memory,

flown:
All swept away, to be perceived no more,
Like idle structures on the sandy shore,
The chance amusement of the playful boy,
That the rude billows in their rage destroy.
Poor George confess'd, though loth the truth to

find,
Slight was his knowledge of a Brother's mind:
The vulgar pipe was to the wife offence,
The frequent grog to Isaac an expense;
Would friends like hers, she question'd, 'choose to

come
Where clouds of poison'd fume defiled a room?
This could their Lady-friend, and Burgess Steel
(Teased with his worship's asthma), bear to feel?
Could they associate or converse with him -
A loud rough sailor with a timber limb?'
Cold as he grew, still Isaac strove to show,
By well-feign'd care, that cold he could not grow;
And when he saw his brother look distress'd,
He strove some petty comforts to suggest;
On his wife solely their neglect to lay,
And then t'excuse it, as a woman's way;
He too was chidden when her rules he broke,
And when she sicken'd at the scent of smoke.
George, though in doubt, was still consoled to

find
His Brother wishing to be reckoned kind:
That Isaac seem'd concern'd by his distress,
Gave to his injured feelings some redress;
But none he found disposed to lend an ear
To stories, all were once intent to hear:
Except his nephew, seated on his knee,
He found no creature cared about the sea;
But George indeed--for George they call'd the boy,
When his good uncle was their boast and joy -
Would listen long, and would contend with sleep,
To hear the woes and wonders of the deep;
Till the fond mother cried--'That man will teach
The foolish boy his rude and boisterous speech.'
So judged the father--and the boy was taught
To shun the uncle, whom his love had sought.
The mask of kindness now but seldom worn,
George felt each evil harder to be borne;
And cried (vexation growing day by day),
'Ah! brother Isaac! What! I'm in the way!'
'No! on my credit, look ye, No! but I
Am fond of peace, and my repose would buy
On any terms--in short, we must comply:
My spouse had money--she must have her will -
Ah! brother, marriage is a bitter pill.'
George tried the lady--'Sister, I offend.'
'Me?' she replied--'Oh no! you may depend
On my regard--but watch your brother's way,
Whom I, like you, must study and obey.'
'Ah!' thought the Seaman, 'what a head was mine,
That easy berth at Greenwich to resign!
I'll to the parish'--but a little pride,
And some affection, put the thought aside.
Now gross neglect and open scorn he bore
In silent sorrow--but he felt the more:
The odious pipe he to the kitchen took,
Or strove to profit by some pious book.
When the mind stoops to this degraded state,
New griefs will darken the dependant's fate;
'Brother!' said Isaac, 'you will sure excuse
The little freedom I'm compell'd to use:
My wife's relations--(curse the haughty crew!) -
Affect such niceness, and such dread of you:
You speak so loud--and they have natures soft -
Brother--I wish--do go upon the loft!'
Poor George obey'd, and to the garret fled,
Where not a being saw the tears he shed:
But more was yet required, for guests were come,
Who could not dine if he disgraced the room.
It shock'd his spirit to be esteem'd unfit
With an own brother and his wife to sit;
He grew rebellious--at the vestry spoke
For weekly aid--they heard it as a joke:
'So kind a brother, and so wealthy--you
Apply to us?--No! this will never do:
Good neighbour Fletcher,' said the Overseer,
'We are engaged--you can have nothing here!'
George mutter'd something in despairing tone,
Then sought his loft, to think and grieve alone;
Neglected, slighted, restless on his bed,
With heart half broken, and with scraps ill fed;
Yet was he pleased that hours for play design'd
Were given to ease his ever-troubled mind;
The child still listen'd with increasing joy,
And he was sooth'd by the attentive boy.
At length he sicken'd, and this duteous child
Watch'd o'er his sickness, and his pains beguiled;
The mother bade him from the loft refrain,
But, though with caution, yet he went again;
And now his tales the Sailor feebly told,
His heart was heavy, and his limbs were cold:
The tender boy came often to entreat
His good kind friend would of his presents eat;
Purloin'd or purchased, for he saw, with shame,
The food untouch'd that to his uncle came;
Who, sick in body and in mind, received
The boy's indulgence, gratified and grieved.
'Uncle will die!' said George: --the piteous

wife
Exclaim'd, 'she saw no value in his life;
But, sick or well, to my commands attend,
And go no more to your complaining friend.'
The boy was vex'd, he felt his heart reprove
The stern decree.--What! punish'd for his love!
No! he would go, but softly, to the room,
Stealing in silence--for he knew his doom.
Once in a week the father came to say,
'George, are you ill?' and hurried him away;
Yet to his wife would on their duties dwell,
And often cry, 'Do use my brother well:'
And something kind, no question, Isaac meant,
Who took vast credit for the vague intent.
But, truly kind, the gentle boy essay'd
To cheer his uncle, firm, although afraid;
But now the father caught him at the door,
And, swearing--yes, the man in office swore,
And cried, 'Away! How! Brother, I'm surprised
That one so old can be so ill advised:
Let him not dare to visit you again,
Your cursed stories will disturb his brain;
Is it not vile to court a foolish boy,
Your own absurd narrations to enjoy?
What! sullen!--ha, George Fletcher! you shall see,
Proud as you are, your bread depends on me!'
He spoke, and, frowning, to his dinner went,
Then cool'd and felt some qualms of discontent:
And thought on times when he compell'd his son
To hear these stories, nay, to beg for one;
But the wife's wrath o'ercame the brother's pain,
And shame was felt, and conscience rose, in vain.
George yet stole up; he saw his Uncle lie
Sick on the bed, and heard his heavy sigh;
So he resolved, before he went to rest,
To comfort one so dear and so distressed;
Then watch'd his time, but, with a child-like art,
Betray'd a something treasured at his heart:
Th' observant wife remark'd, 'The boy is grown
So like your brother, that he seems his own:
So close and sullen! and I still suspect
They often meet: --do watch them and detect.'
George now remark'd that all was still as night,
And hasten'd up with terror and delight;
'Uncle!' he cried, and softly tapp'd the door,
Do let me in'--but he could add no more;
The careful father caught him in the fact,
And cried,--'You serpent! is it thus you act?
'Back to your mother!'--and, with hasty blow,
He sent th' indignant boy to grieve below;
Then at the door an angry speech began -
'Is this your conduct?--Is it thus you plan?
Seduce my child, and make my house a scene
Of vile dispute--What is it that you mean?
George, are you dumb? do learn to know your

friends,
And think a while on whom your bread depends.
What! not a word? be thankful I am cool -
But, sir, beware, nor longer play the fool.
Come! brother, come! what is it that you seek
By this rebellion?--Speak, you villain, speak!
Weeping! I warrant--sorrow makes you dumb:
I'll ope your mouth, impostor! if I come:
Let me approach--I'll shake you from the bed,
You stubborn dog--Oh God! my Brother's dead!'
Timid was Isaac, and in all the past
He felt a purpose to be kind at last:
Nor did he mean his brother to depart,
Till he had shown this kindness of his heart;
But day by day he put the cause aside,
Induced by av'rice, peevishness, or pride.
But now awaken'd, from this fatal time
His conscience Isaac felt, and found his crime:
He raised to George a monumental stone,
And there retired to sigh and think alone;
An ague seized him, he grew pale, and shook -
'So,' said his son, 'would my poor Uncle look.'
'And so, my child, shall I like him expire.'
'No! you have physic and a cheerful fire.'
'Unhappy sinner! yes, I'm well supplied
With every comfort my cold heart denied.'
He view'd his Brother now, but not as one
Who vex'd his wife by fondness for her son;
Not as with wooden limb, and seaman's tale,
The odious pipe, vile grog, or humbler ale:
He now the worth and grief alone can view
Of one so mild, so generous, and so true;
'The frank, kind Brother, with such open heart, -
And I to break it--'twas a demon's part!'
So Isaac now, as led by conscience, feels,
Nor his unkindness palliates or conceals;
'This is your folly,' said his heartless wife:
'Alas! my folly cost my Brother's life;
It suffer'd him to languish and decay -
My gentle Brother, whom I could not pay,
And therefore left to pine, and fret his life away

!'
He takes his Son, and bids the boy unfold
All the good Uncle of his feelings told,
All he lamented--and the ready tear
Falls as he listens, soothed, and grieved to hear.
'Did he not curse me, child?'--'He never cursed,
But could not breathe, and said his heart would

burst.'
'And so will mine:'--'Then, father, you must pray:
My uncle said it took his pains away.'
Repeating thus his sorrows, Isaac shows
That he, repenting, feels the debt he owes,
And from this source alone his every comfort flows.
He takes no joy in office, honours, gain;
They make him humble, nay, they give him pain:
'These from my heart,' he cries, 'all feeling

drove;
They made me cold to nature, dead to love.'
He takes no joy in home, but sighing, sees
A son in sorrow, and a wife at ease;
He takes no joy in office--see him now,
And Burgess Steel has but a passing bow;
Of one sad train of gloomy thoughts possess'd,
He takes no joy in friends, in food, in rest -
Dark are the evil days, and void of peace the best.
And thus he lives, if living be to sigh,
And from all comforts of the world to fly,
Without a hope in life--without a wish to die.

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Feel The Philippine Rain

mY Friend
you've got to feel the
philippine rain
sometime
it is too refreshing...

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To Feel The Pain

To feel the pain
Of all the Beauty passing
Life come once
that will not come again.

To see and feel
And never really understand

How Life
This life
Is here and is not
And all its Beauty passing
And lost
And never to be again
Forever.

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Feel the Pain

Feel the pain of all the women here,
feel the pain and shed a tear.
Once all final suffering ends,
we can begin a new again.
Goddess will reign once more,
no more fighting, no more wars.
For the ego of man will cease to exist,
once conscious mind is in total bliss.


(May 22,2011)

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I feel your pain

I feel your pain,
Because i am your pain,
The hurt you have,
I caused,
I broke the heart,
The only hart that ever cared for me,
The pain you try to hide,
Is all because of me,
I caused you pain,
I would do anything,
To take the pain away,
All the pain i caused,
I feel your pain,
Because i am your pain,

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You Can't Feel My Pain

You can not feel my pain.
But you can see my smile.
Life is great but can be vile.
People will hate and steal your style.
Sucess is a long mile.
I am looking for gold mines in a pile.
But you can not feel my pain.
You just know my name.
We not the same.
I am human that has virtile.
My past is old as fossil.
No looking back.
If I do, I will be hurt with sorrow.
I must see tomorrow.
As faith of the lord, I must follow.

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When Will They Wake Up To See

A fated greed is celebrated.
Who becomes destroyed.
The needs of people are negated,
Yet who is annoyed.
Ambitious wishes to deceive,
Has the wicked on their knees.
Rulers they will never be.
Nor decoys employed.

When will they wake up to see,
Only One God there will be.
But continue they believe,
The Earth is just their toy!

A fated greed is celebrated.
Who becomes destroyed.
The needs of people are negated,
Yet who is annoyed.
When will they wake up to see,
Only One God there will be.
But continue they believe,
The Earth is just their toy!

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Broken Time

Lost track of time
Can´t figure out what u say
Maybe i´ve lost my mind
I can´t just erase and rewind
Needing some time to think
Even tho I can hardly remember
How it can be done
Looking behind me, I´ve left no footprints
On the sand, can´t discover where it begun
Lost track of time
Can´t figure where my life is headed to
Maybe i´ve lost myself
I can´t just dust my old self off that dusty shelf
Needing some time to breathe
Start it all over again
Looking behind me, my feet feel no pain
Can´t realize where it all truly stands
Lost track of time
The clock isn´t ticking anymore,
So i´ll just walk past that rusty door

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Mark of Pain

Fading, what we feel about pain, eaten by the rolling times
Whether long or short time will it take to be faded away
One can say that pain never leave, one can say that pain is curable
But one thing surely happens is pain leaves its mark
even when the touch of its torchery has gone
Like hammering that wooden body of our feeling and flesh
that mean mark of the nail will never recover
Now life will easier to walk through if you see that sickening mark is left behind
but never dare to forget its warning, when you're about to face the same swinging hit again
Never again you feel your pain stay forever
'Cause only its mark remains silent, but not its real flames

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Where Are You Christmas

Where are you christmas
Why cant I find you
Why have you gone away
Where is the laughter
You used to bring me
Why cant I hear music play
My world is changing
Im rearranging
Does that mean christmas changes too
Where are you christmas
Do you remember
The one you used to know
Im not the same one
See what the times done
Is that why you have let me go
Christmas is here
Everywhere, oh
Christmas is here
If you care, oh
If there is love in your heart and your mind
You will feel like christmas all the time
I feel you christmas
I know Ive found you
You never fade away
The joy of christmas
Stays here in silence
Fills each and every heart with love
Where are you christmas
Fills your heart with love

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