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Bram Stoker

Van Helsing [summed it all up as he said, with our boy on his knee]: We want no proofs; we ask none to believe us! This boy will some day know what a brave and gallant woman his mother is. Already he knows her sweetness and loving care; later on he will understand how some men so loved her, that they did dare much for her sake.

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To Not Know What One Is And Should Be

TO NOT KNOW WHAT ONE IS AND SHOULD BE

To not know what one is and should be
Is ridiculous at the age of seventy-

To play games with one's own identity
Is a sport for those much younger-

Nonetheless I in my endless I-I-I ing
Play on,
Less serving You
Than I once dreamed,
And still obsessed as I was supposed to learn not to be
By my own name

Vanity of vanity says the preacher
And I in my case
In spades.

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So Much for Us

The Lord God did so much for us, when we came to Christ Jesus,
Wickedly lost and so depraved, sinful men, by Christ God saved,
So far from any thoughts of God, living upon this sin cursed sod,
Who, when found in Jesus Christ, are now clothed for Eternal Life.

We were chosen by God's Grace, then destined for a better place,
To live forever with Jesus Christ, this, as we enter into Eternal Life;
As He who loved us died for all, to redeem man from Adam's Fall,
Saved from that curse of death, when we're granted eternal breath.

Yes, God bought us with a price, so we could enter into Paradise,
The Precious Blood of The Lamb, so to live with The Great 'I AM';
Cleansing us from sin and stain, not through our trial, but His pain,
Through Christ's death on Calvary, so that man could live eternally.

He robed us in His Righteousness, far from our wicked sinfulness,
And His Righteousness will endure, from this time, to forevermore;
As Christ keeps us upon this earth, through His Spirit of New Birth,
Being kept for greater things, to serve eternally, The King of kings.

By Christ we have been Glorified, so that in Heaven we may reside,
In that Mansion, prepared for us, by our risen Savior, Christ Jesus,
To live with The Lord God forever, with Christ's Church all together,
Being together in Heaven eternally; all attained by Christ at Calvary.


(08/2011)

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For the Lady by the Lake

I believe in you and have for quite awhile now
I believe in you and you might not even know how
I believe in you and to you I will make this vow
That I will believe in you as long as life and breath allow

I believe in you and how your many talents run
I believe in you because you care so deep, barring none
I believe in you even when each day is anything but fun
And I will believe in you even after all the dealing’s done

I believe in you because you are my dearest friend
I believe in you and on your caring I depend
I believe in you and against all others will defend
Because I believe in you and will long past my life’s own end

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What's Wrong and What's Right

Baby oh baby.
You make me understand the meaning of life.
Complications you make easy.
You make me comprehend like I can...
Without one spite.

Baby oh baby.
You make my moon reach closer to believe.
I can reach for the stars and make it.
And pocket everything,
In between!

Baby oh baby.
You forgave and forgot for real.
You helped me mend what I was leaving.
To grieve with wounds,
By myself...
I know would never heal.

Baby oh baby.
You make me understand the meaning of life.
Complications you make easy.
You make me comprehend like I can...
Without one spite.

Or reason to call it a night.
Without a fuss,
Bicker or bite.
When what is done is for the one...
Who needs to know,
What's wrong and what's right!

When what is done
Is for the one
Who needs to know...
What is wrong!
And 'that' makes that wrong that wasn't right...
Explained,
Before a fight!

Explained,
Before a fight.

That's all this needed,
Before a fight.

We found 'us' too much in love...
To start a fight!

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Why Did I Fall For That

The streets of the future littered with remains
The streets of the future littered with remains
Of both the fools and the so called brains
Of both the fools and the so called brains
The whole prediction is enough to kill
The whole prediction is enough to kill
But only God knows if it wont or it will
But only God knows if it wont or it will
Nobody knows why we fell so flat
Nobody knows why we fell so flat
Some silly creature said wed never crack
Some silly creature said wed never crack
Most would just survive and then bounce back
Most would just survive and then bounce back
But the rest are crying whyd I fall for that crap
But the rest are crying whyd I fall for that crap
Why did I fall for that?
Why did I fall for that?
So many rash promises sincerly made
So many rash promises sincerly made
By people who believed that we were being saved
By people who believed that we were being saved
They made us all believe that we were acting white
They made us all believe that we were acting white
But the truth is weve forgotten how we used to fight
But the truth is weve forgotten how we used to fight
Nobody knows why we fell so flat
Nobody knows why we fell so flat
Were impotent and neutered like whining cats
Were impotent and neutered like whining cats
Weve found the piper but weve lost the rats
Weve found the piper but weve lost the rats
But the kids are crying whyd I fall for that dad?
But the kids are crying whyd I fall for that dad?
Why did you fall?
Why did you fall?
It never rains under my umbrella
It never rains under my umbrella
Four minutes to midnight on a sunny day
Four minutes to midnight on a sunny day
Maybe if we smile the clockll fade away
Maybe if we smile the clockll fade away
Maybe we can force the hands to just reverse
Maybe we can force the hands to just reverse
Maybe a word, maybe maybe is a curse
Maybe a word, maybe maybe is a curse
Nobody knows why we fell so flat
Nobody knows why we fell so flat
Weve never been taught to fight or to face up to facts
Weve never been taught to fight or to face up to facts
We simply believe that wed remain intact
We simply believe that wed remain intact
But history is asking why did you fall for that
But history is asking why did you fall for that
Why did you fall?
Why did you fall?
Why did I fall for that
Why did I fall for that
Why did I fall for that
Why did I fall for that
Why did I fall for that
Why did I fall for that

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At The Reunion Party (Grandma's)

to drown my well-kept storm
i purge words
too many like bats driven from
a cave
flying on barbaric sounds
and one of you looks at me
with a stab
but it will not hurt me a bit
i ignore
whatever tries to hurt
whatever skins me out to reveal
a damaged bone

think of me
as a happy bee that is all i can ask for
this moment
i shall like it
for what you think
makes me become
what i am not

the hours will run like a windmill
and water pours out
to satisfy the mouth of the hill
and i will be happy to see
something filled
a thirst satisfied

you see i admit i am wrong in
trying to be alone by myself
in doing so for the past days
i shrink like
a plastic bottle
heated by
a candle

i realize the link
it is always a you and I
and the rest of the people in the world
my feet are your feet
my hands are your very hands too
my mind is a lonely planet
lost without the sun
and the rest of the lonely planets
in this always moving
universe

i know what depression is
and now i know how to delet it.

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City Aint Big Enough

Ooh
Yeah
Ooh
Ahh
We met at work
And we played from the start
You were the dj
I was working in behind the bar
Our love was sudden
You were doing something right
You started seeing one out of sight
In the beginning (beginning)
When you were spinning (spinning)
It was my song you were playing
I was never saying
What I was feeling (feeling)
What words I dealing (dealing)
But I cant hold it back no more
cos I dont wanna be friends
Baby you better know
What you I never know
You bring the light in both ends
Type of girl when you got a lot
One is not enough
City aint big enough
Doctor, doctor
Give me something
So I can fight to the end, cos the
City aint big enough
For both of us
Both of us
Both of us
Didnt want to turn it into a gap fight
But when the trouble it double
You wont like
I wanna let it down and you came first
And if the bubble is about to burst
In the beginning (beginning)
When you were spinning (spinning)
It was my song you were playing
I was never saying
What I was feeling (feeling)
What words I dealing (dealing)
But I cant hold it back no more
cos I dont wanna be friends
Baby you better know
What you I never know
You bring the light in both ends
Type of girl when you got a lot
One is not enough
City aint big enough
Doctor, doctor
Give me something
So I can fight to the end, cos the
City aint big enough
For both of us
Both of us
Both of us
I dont want this to get ugly
But if you push it girl just trust me
If you think that this is ok
You dont know what Im about
And boy just wipe the smile off your face
You aint that good at all anyway
And if you think that were friends that way
You dont know what Im about
cos I dont wanna be friends
Baby you better know
What you I never know
You bring the light in both ends
Type of girl when you got a lot
One is not enough
City aint big enough
Doctor, doctor
Give me something
So I can fight to the end, cos the
City aint big enough
City aint big enough
cos I dont wanna be friends
Baby you better know
What you I never know
You bring the light in both ends
Type of girl when you got a lot
One is not enough
City aint big enough
Doctor, doctor
Give me something
So I can fight to the end, cos the
City aint big enough
For both of us
Both of us
Both of us
Dont wanna be more than friends
Gonna fight until the end
Dont wanna be more than friends
Typical, one is not enough
Dont wanna be more than friends
Gonna fight until the end

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And shortly after that, when I try to get access to those soldiers, to ask them what in the world was going on, I was told that they did not work for me and I had no right to have access to any one of them.

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The Problem With The Wind

the problem with the wind
is its senselessness
it comes it goes and it seems
it does not even know where it is going
you think it feels you
it doesn't
it simply moves around and
comes back around like an accidental whirlpool
it is numb it does not even know
what a rock and a cloud means
the earthworms fear it
the birds too
whose wings it breaks without even feeling sorry
for the caused calamity
the problem with the wind is that it is like silence
not because it woos it and carries it away sometimes
but because it is cold
so cold that it numbs and shatters
what was once whole and heartfelt.

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Nobody Knows What This Poem Means

NOBODY KNOWS WHAT THIS POEM MEANS

Nobody knows what this poem means
And yet it seems to mean what it seems-

A poem that only apparently means
Is not the poem
That seems what it seems-

So this poem perhaps does not know
What it means-
And like most other poems
Means more than it means..

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The Life And Death Of Tom Thumb

In Arthur's court Tom Thumb did live,
A man of mickle might ;
The best of all the table round,
And eke a doughty knight.
His stature but an inch in height,
Or quarter of a span :
Then think you not this little knight
Was proved a valiant man ?

His father was a ploughman plain,
His mother milk'd the cow,
Yet how that they might have a son
They knew not what to do :
Until such time this good old man
To learned Merlin goes,
And there to him his deep desires
In secret manner shows.

How in his heart he wish'd to have
A child, in time to come,
To be his heir, though it might be
No bigger than his thumb.

Of which old Merlin thus foretold,
That he his wish should have,
And so this son of statue small
The charmer to him gave.

No blood nor bones in him should be,
In shape, and being such
That men should hear him speak, but not
His wandering shadow touch.

But so unseen to go or come,—
Whereas it pleas'd him still ;
Begot and born in half and hour,
To fit his father's will.

And in four minutes grew so fast
That he became so tall
As was the ploughman's thumb in height,
And so they did him call—
TOM THUMB, the which the fairy queen
There gave him to his name,
Who, with her train of goblins grim,
Unto his christening came.

Whereas she cloth'd him richly brave,
In garments fine and fair,
Which lasted him for many years
In seemly sort to wear.

His hat made of an oaken leaf,
His shirt a spider's web,
Both light and soft for those his limbs
That were so smally bred.

His hose and doublet thistle-down,
Together weaved full fine ;
His stockings of an apple green,
Made of the outward rind ;

His garters were two little hairs
Pull'd from his mother's eye,
His boots and shoes, a mouse's skin,
Were tann'd most curiously.

Thus like a lusty gallant, he
Adventured forth to go,
With other children in the streets,
His pretty tricks to show.
Where he for counters, pins, and points,
And cherry-stones did play,
Till he amongst those gamesters young
Had lost his stock away.

Yet could he soon renew the same,
Whereas most nimbly he
Would dive into their cherry-bags,
And their partaker be,

Unseen or felt by any one,
Until this scholar shut
This nimble youth into a box,
Wherein his pins he put.

Of whom to be reveng'd he took,
In mirth and pleasant game,
Black pots and glasses, which he hung
Upon a bright sun-beam.

The other boys to do the like
In pieces broke them quite ;
For which they were most soundly whipt ;
Whereat he laughed outright.

And so Tom Thumb restrained was,
From these his sports and play ;
And by his mother after that,
Compell'd at home to stay.
Whereas about a Christmas time,
His father a hog had kill'd ;
And Tom would see the puddings made,
For fear they should be spill'd.

He sate upon the pudding-bole,
The candle for to hold ;
Of which there is unto this day,
A pretty pastime told :

For Tom fell in, and could not be
For ever after found,
For in the blood and batter he
Was strangely lost and drown'd.

Where searching long, but all in vain,
His mother after that,
Into a pudding thrust her son,
Instead of minced-meat.

Which pudding of the largest size,
Into the kettle thrown,
Made all the rest to fly thereout,
As with a whirlwind blown :

For so it tumbled up and down,
Within the liquor there,
As if the devil had been boil'd,—
Such was his mother's fear,
That up she took the pudding straight,
And gave it at the door
Unto a tinker, which from thence
In his black budget bore ;

But as the tinker climb'd a stile,
He nearly tumbled back :
Now gip, old knave ! out cried Tom Thumb,
A-hanging on his pack.

At which the tinker 'gan to run,
And would no longer stay ;
And cast both bag and pudding down,
And thence hied fast away.

From which Tom Thumb got loose at last,
And home return'd again ;
Where he from following dangers long,
In safety did remain :

Until such time his mother went
A-milking of her kine ;
Where Tom unto a thistle fast
She linked with a twine.

A thread that held him to the same,
For fear the blustering wind
Should blow him hence,—that so she might
Her son in safety find.
But mark the hap ! a cow came by,
And up the thistle eat ;
Poor Tom withal, that, as a dock,
Was made the red cow's meat.

Who, being miss'd, his mother went
Him calling everywhere ;
Where art thou, Tom ? Where art thou, Tom ?
Quoth he, here, mother, here !

Within the red cow's stomach here,
Your son is swallowed up :
The which into her fearful heart,
Most careful dolours put.

Meanwhile the cow was troubled much,
And soon releas'd Tom Thumb ;
No rest she had till out her mouth,
In bad plight he did come.

Now after this, in sowing time,
His father would him have
Into the field to drive his plough,
And thereupon him gave—

A whip made of a barley-straw,
To drive the cattle on ;
Where, in a furrow'd land new sown,
Poor Tom was lost and gone.
Now by a raven of great strength,
Away he thence was borne,
And carried in the carrion's beak,
Even like a grain of corn,

Unto a giant's castle top,
In which he let him fall ;
Where soon the giant swallowed up
His body, clothes, and all.

But soon the giant spat him out,
Three miles into the sea ;
Whereas a fish soon took him up,
And bore him thence away.

Which lusty fish was after caught,
And to king Arthur sent ;
Where Tom was found, and made his dwarf,
Whereas his days he spent

Long time in lively jollity,
Belov'd of all the court ;
And none like Tom was then esteem'd,
Among the noble sort.

Amongst his deeds of courtship done,
His highness did command,
That he should dance a galliard brave
Upon his queen's left hand.
The which he did, and for the same
The king his signet gave,
Which Tom about his middle wore,
Long time a girdle brave.

How, after this, the king would not
Abroad for pleasure go
But still Tom Thumb must ride with him,
Placed on his saddle-bow.

Whereon a time when, as it rain'd,
Tom Thumb most nimbly crept
In at a button-hole, where he
Within his bosom slept.

And being near his highness' heart,
He crav'd a wealthy boon,
A liberal gift, the which the king
Commanded to be done.

For to relieve his father's wants,
And mother's, being old ;
Which was, so much of silver coin
As well his arms could hold.

And so away goes lusty Tom,
With threepence on his back,
A heavy burthen, which might make
His wearied limbs to crack.
So travelling two days and nights,
With labour and great pain,
He came into the house whereat
His parents did remain ;

Which was but half a mile in space
From good king Arthur's court,
The which, in eight and forty hours,
He went in weary sort.

But coming to his father's door,
He there such entrance had
As made his parents both rejoice,
And he thereat was glad.

His mother in her apron took
Her gentle son in haste,
And by the fire-side, within
A walnut-shell him placed ;

Whereas they feasted him three days
Upon a hazel-nut,
Whereon he rioted so long,
He them to charges put ;

And thereupon grew wond'rous sick,
Through eating too much meat,
Which was sufficient for a month
For this great man to eat.
But now his business call'd him forth
King Arthur's court to see,
Whereas no longer from the same
He could a stranger be.

But yet a few small April drops
Which settled in the way,
His long and weary journey forth
Did hinder and so stay.

Until his careful father took
A birding trunk in sport,
And with one blast, blew this his son
Into king Arthur's court.

Now he with tilts and tournaments
Was entertained so,
That all the best of Arthur's knights
Did him much pleasure show :

As good Sir Lancelot du Lake,
Sir Tristam, and Sir Guy ;
Yet none compar'd with brave Tom Thumb
For knightly chivalry.

In honour of which noble day,
And for his lady's sake,
A challenge in king Arthur's court
Tom Thumb did bravely make.
'Gainst whom these noble knights did run,
Sir Chinon and the rest,
Yet still Tom Thumb, with matchless might,
Did bear away the best.

At last Sir Lancelot du Lake
In manly sort came in,
And with this stout and hardy knight
A battle did begin.

Which made the courtiers all aghast,
For there that valiant man,
Through Lancelot's steed, before them all,
In nimble manner ran.

Yea, horse and all, with spear and shield,
As hardy he was seen,
But only by king Arthur's self
And his admired queen ;

Who from her finger took a ring,
Through which Tom Thumb made way,
Not touching it, in nimble sort,
As it was done in play.

He likewise cleft the smallest hair
From his fair lady's head
Not hurting her whose even hand
Him lasting honours bred.
Such were his deeds and noble acts
In Arthur's court there shone,
As like in all the world beside
Was hardly seen or known.

Now at these sports he toil'd himself,
That he a sickness took,
Through which all manly exercise
He carelessly forsook.

When lying on his bed sore sick,
King Arthur's doctor came,
With cunning skill, by physic's art,
To ease and cure the same.

His body being so slender small,
This cunning doctor took
A fine perspective glass, with which
He did in secret look—

Into his sickened body down,
And therein saw that Death
Stood ready in his wasted frame
To cease his vital breath.

His arms and legs consum'd as small
As was a spider's web,
Through which his dying hour grew on,
For all his limbs grew dead.
His face no bigger than an ant's,
Which hardly could be seen ;
The loss of which renowned knight
Much grieved the king and queen.

And so with peace and quietness
He left this earth below ;
And up into the fairy-land
His ghost did fading go.

Whereas the fairy-queen receiv'd,
With heavy mourning cheer,
The body of this valiant knight,
Whom she esteem'd so dear.

For with her dancing nymphs in green,
She fetch'd him from his bed,
With music and sweet melody,
So soon as life was fled ;

For whom king Arthur and his knights
Full forty days did mourn ;
And, in remembrance of his name,
That was so strangely born—

He built a tomb of marble gray,
And year by year did come
To celebrate ye mournful death
And burial of Tom Thumb.
Whose fame still lives in England here,
Amongst the country sort ;
Of whom our wives and children small
Tell tales of pleasant sport.

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The Child Who Does Not Recognize His Mother

when his mother comes
he does not utter the word mama
the mother tells him
Me, Mama, and hugs him
but he wrestles her away
he grabs a ball and throws it away
and he chases it
he falls on the ground
and shouts for help

his mother rushes to help him
removes the dirt from his shirt
and calms him down

then the boy utters the word at last
Mama
the mother smiles and kisses him

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Sonnet XVII: His Mother Dear Cupid

His mother dear Cupid offended late,
Because that Mars grown slacker in her love,
With pricking shot he did not throughly more
To keep the pace of their first loving state.

The boy refus'd for fear of Mars's hate,
Who threaten'd stripes, if he his wrath did prove:
But she in chafe him from her lap did shove,
Brake bow, brake shafts, while Cupid weeping sate:

Till that his grandame Nature pityijng it
Of stella's brows make him two better bows,
And in her eyes of arrows infinite.

Oh how for joy he leaps, oh how he crows,
And straight therewith like wags new got to play,
Falls to shrewd turns, and I was in his way.

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Be Brave And Be Strong

Be brave and be strong!
For life is like that at times;
And it had continued till this day.
Life is like a dragon engraved with a woman at times,
But a servant is not greater than his ruler!
And like the white pig and the black mony,
But many are those still living for survival at Lake Victoria.

You have a ship but you don't have a fish to eat,
And like Nero who became the Fourth Emperor of Rome;
But be bery brave and very strong in this world always,
For the wind blows to where it wants to.

Wonderful words,
Wonderful world,
Wonderful love,
Wonderful art,
Wonderful act,
Wonderful minds;
You have a farm but you don't have food to eat,
And like many living for survival at Lake Victoria! !
But a servant is not greater than his ruler.

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His Mother's Best Friend

O’Brien fancied his mother’s best friend,
Mrs O’Hara, she with the daughter
Who showed her panties to boys for sixpence.
How are you, Micheal? She asked, as she sat
With legs crossed in the kitchen between sips
Of milky sweet tea. I’m fine, he replied,
Studying her legs, trying to pursue
With his greedy eyes, the length of her thighs.
How old are you now? Her soft voice inquired.
Fourteen, he replied. He lifted his sight
To her weighty breasts, picturing his head
Wedged tightly between. Don’t sit their gawping,
Go get to your play, his plump mother said.
He took a last look, trying to capture
Mrs O’ Hara with her legs and breasts
And what lay beneath, for his nightly dreams
In his sweaty bed, be they wet or dry,
And gave her a smile and wink of his eye.

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His Mother

In the first dawn she lifted from her bed
The holy silver of her noble head,
And listened, listened, listened for his tread.
'Too soon, too soon !' she murmured, 'Yet I'll keep
My vigil longer­ thou, O tender Sleep,
Art but the joy of those who wake and weep!

'Joy's self hath keen, wide eyes. O flesh of mine,
And mine own blood and bone, the very wine
Of my aged heart, I see thy dear eyes shine!

'I hear thy tread; thy light, loved footsteps run
Along the way, eager for that 'Well done !'
We'll weep and kiss to thee, my soldier son!

'Blest motherhe lives! Yet had he died
Blest were I still, ­ I sent him on the tide
Of my full heart to save his nation's pride!'

'O God, if that I tremble so to-day,
Bowed with such blessings that I cannot pray
By speech­ a mother prays, dear Lord, alway

'In some far fibre of her trembling mind!
I'll up­ I thought I heard a bugle bind
Its silver with the silver of the wind. '

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William Butler Yeats

Two Songs Rewritten For The Tune's Sake

I
My Paistin Finn is my sole desire,
And I am shrunken to skin and bone,
For all my heart has had for its hire
Is what I can whistle alone and alone.
Oro, oro.!
Tomorrow night I will break down the door.
What is the good of a man and he
Alone and alone, with a speckled shin?
I would that I drank with my love on my knee
Between two barrels at the inn.
Oro, oro.!

To-morrow night I will break down the door.
Alone and alone nine nights I lay
Between two bushes under the rain;
I thought to have whistled her down that
I whistled and whistled and whistled in vain.
Oro, oro!
To-morrow night I will break down the door.

II
I would that I were an old beggar
Rolling a blind pearl eye,
For he cannot see my lady
Go gallivanting by;
A dreary, dreepy beggar
Without a friend on the earth
But a thieving rascally cur --
O a beggar blind from his birth;
Or anything else but a rhymer
Without a thing in his head
But rhymes for a beautiful lady,
He rhyming alone in his bed.

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Like His Mother Nature

Despite advanced medical technology people still age and die
And though people on an average live longer now one fact we can't deny
Is that the Reaper who claims every life will one day claim your's and mine
Each day we live we draw closer to our lives finish line.

If wealthy people could live forever more how awful that would be
'Twould seem that Nature would be punishing all of those in poverty
But Nature can't be bribed or bought she is beyond reproach
She does not differentiate between the life of a Human Being or the water dwelling Roach.

Yes nature is beyond reproach she treats as equal all
From the World's most influential Human Being to the wood louse in garden wall
And the Reaper the son of Nature for all of us he wait
He claims the life of each living thing and he does not differentiate

Between the life of a Human Being and a Cockroach whom he does treat the same
He will not spare you just because you have great wealth and fame
And like his Mother Nature he is beyond reproach
He will claim the life of the great Monarch and the water dwelling Roach.

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The Step Mother

Well I recall my Father's wife,
The day he brought her home.
His children looked for years of strife,
And troubles sure to come --
Ungraciously we welcomed her,
A thing to scorn and blame;
And swore we never would confer
On her, a Mother's name

I see her yet -- a girl in years,
With eyes so blue and mild;
She greeted us with smiles and tears,
How sweetly too she smiled --
She bent to kiss my sullen brow,
With woman's gentle grace;
And laid her tiny hand of snow
On my averted face --

"Henry -- is this your son? She said --
"Dear boy -- he now is mine --
What not one kiss? --" I shook my head,
"I am no son of thine! --"
She sighed -- and from her dimpled cheek
The rosy colour fled;
She turned away and did not speak,
My thoughts were with the dead --

There leaped from out my Father's eyes
A jet of swarthy fire;
That flashed on me in fierce surprise --
I fled before his ire
I heard her gentle voice entreat --
"Forgiveness for her sake" --
Which added swiftness to my feet,
A sad and strange mistake --

A year had scarcely rolled away
When by that hated bride;
I loved to linger half the day,
In very joy and pride;
Her voice was music to mine ear,
So soft its accent fell;
"Dear Mother now" -- and oh, how dear
No words of mine can tell --

She was so gentle, fair and kind,
So pure in soul and free from art;
That woman with her noble mind,
Subdued my rebel heart --
I just had learned to know her worth,
My Father's second choice to bless;
When God removed her from the earth,
And plunged us all in deep distress --

Hot fever smote with burning blight
Stretchd on a restless bed of pain;
I moaning lay from morn till night
With aching limbs and throbbing brain --
Four weary weeks beside my bed,
She sat within a darkened room;
Untiring held my aching head,
Nor heeded silence -- cold and gloom --

And when my courage quite gave way,
And fainter grew my struggling breath;
She taught my stricken soul to pray
And calmly meet approaching death --
"Fear not God's angel, sent by Him,
The weary spirit to release;
Before the mortal eyes grow dim,
Floats down the white winged dove of peace" --

There came a change -- but fingers small,
No longer smoothed my matted hair;
She sprang not to my feeble call,
Nor helped to lift me to my chair --
And I arose as from the dead,
A life for her dear life was given;
The angel who had watched my bed
Had vanished into Heaven! --

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Fire, Famine, And Slaughter : A War Eclogue

The Scene a desolate Tract in la Vendee. Famine is discovered
lying on the ground; to her enter Fire and Slaughter.

Fam. Sister! sisters! who sent you here?
Slau. [to Fire.] I will whisper it in her ear.
Fire. No! no! no!
Spirits hear what spirits tell:
'Twill make a holiday in Hell.
No! no! no!
Myself, I named him once below,
And all the souls, that damned be,
Leaped up at once in anarchy,
Clapped their hands and danced for glee.
They no longer heeded me,
But laughed to hear Hell's burning rafters
Unwillingly re-echo laughters!
No! no! no!
Spirits hear what spirits tell:
'Twill make a holiday in Hell!
Fam. Whisper it, sister! so and so!
In a dark hint, soft and slow.
Slau. Letters four do form his name --
And who sent you?
Both. The same! the same!
Slau. He came by stealth, and unlocked my den,
And I have drunk the blood since then
Of thrice three hundred thousand men.
Both. Who bade you do it?
Slau. The same! the same!
Letters four do form his name.
He let me loose, and cried Halloo!
To him alone the praise is due.
Fam. Thanks, sister, thanks! the men have bled,
Their wives and their children faint for bread.
I stood in a swampy field of battle;
With bones and skulls I made a rattle,
To frighten the wolf and carrion-crow
And the homeless dog -- but they would not go.
So off I flew: for how could I bear
To see them gorge their dainty fare?
I heard a groan and a peevish squall,
And through the chink of a cottage-wall --
Can you guess what I saw there?
Both. Whisper it, sister! in our ear.
Fam. A baby beat its dying mother;
I had starved the one and was starving the other!
Both. Who bade you do't?
Fam. The same! the same!
Letters four do form his name.
He let me loose, and cried Halloo!
To him alone the praise is due.
Fire. Sisters! I from Ireland came!
Hedge and corn-fields all on flame,
I triumphed o'er the setting sun!
And all the while the work was done,
On as I strode with my huge strides,
I flung back my head and I held my sides,
It was so rare a piece of fun
To see the sweltered cattle run
With uncouth gallop through the night,
Scared by the red and noisy light!
By the light of his own blazing cot
Was many a naked rebel shot:
The house-stream met the flame and hissed,
While crash! fell in the roof, I wist,
On some of those old bed-rid nurses,
That deal in discontent and curses.
Both. Who bade you do't?
Fire. The same! the same!
Letters four do form his name.
He let me loose, and cried Halloo!
To him alone the praise is due.
All. He let us loose, and cried Halloo!
How shall we yield him honor due?
Fam. Wisdom comes with lack of food.
I'll gnaw, I'll gnaw the multitude,
Till the cup of rage o'erbrim:
They shall seize him and his brood--
Slau. They shall tear him limb from limb!
Fire. O thankless beldames and untrue!
And is this all that you can do
For him, who did so much for you?
Ninety months he, by my troth!
Hath richly catered for you both:
And in an hour would you repay
An eight years' work? -- Away! away!
I alone am faithful! I
Cling to him everlastingly.

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