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My lyrics come from my experiences growing up in life, trying to find out and express who I am. That's basically it. I'm not trying to be a prophet or anything like that. I'm just reflecting on life.

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Come From Under the Trappings

Come from under the trappings.
Come from under your need,
To feed your gluttony.
Your needs to be strapped,
To that which can not touch you back!
Come from under the trappings!
There is much more to your life,
Than that!

Come from under the trappings.
Let your beliefs,
Remove the strangle hold and squeeze...
Placed upon the young.
Those that have followed you into darkness,
And have shielded from the Sun!
Those you have fed,
All the misdeeds...
That have blocked and shunned!
Come from under those trappings done.
They are shutting off your breath.
And speeding up your untimely death!

Come from under the trappings.
Come from under your need
To feed your gluttony.
Your needs to be strapped,
To that which can not touch you back!
Come from under the trappings!
There is much more to your life,
Than that!

You might as well!
They are being released from you physically!
Now...
It is time to remove yourself from that grind.
Come from under the trappings.
And find yourself that peace that awaits!
Those trappings can not define,
The quality of life when one has peace of mind!

Come from under the trappings.
Come from under your need
To feed your gluttony.
Your needs to be strapped,
To that which can not touch you back!
Come from under the trappings!
There is much more to your life,
Than that!

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Do I Have To Come Right Out And Say It?

Do I have to come right out
and say it,
Tell you that you look so fine?
Do I have to come right out
and ask you to be mine?
If it was a game I could play it,
Trying to make it
but I'm losing time
I got to bring you in,
you're overworking my mind.
Indecision is crowding me,
I have no room to spare
And I can't believe she cared
Like a dream she has taken me
And now I don't know where
And a part of me is scared
The part of me I shared
Once before.
Do I have to come right out
and say it,
Tell you that you look so fine?
Do I have to come right out
and ask you to be mine?
Indecision is crowding me,
I have no room to spare
And I can't believe she cared
Like a dream she has taken me
And now I don't know where
And a part of me is scared
The part of me I shared
Once before.
Do I have to come right out
and say it, girl
Tell you that you look so fine?
Do I have to come right out
and ask you to be mine?
If it was a game I could play it,
Trying to make it
but I'm losing time
I got to bring you in,
you're overworking my mind.
Do I have to come right out
and say it, girl
Tell you that you look so fine?

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The Horses

Barely a twelvemonth after
The seven days war that put the world to sleep,
Late in the evening the strange horses came.
By then we had made our covenant with silence,
But in the first few days it was so still
We listened to our breathing and were afraid.
On the second day
The radios failed; we turned the knobs; no answer.
On the third day a warship passed us, heading north,
Dead bodies piled on the deck. On the sixth day
A plane plunged over us into the sea. Thereafter
Nothing. The radios dumb;
And still they stand in corners of our kitchens,
And stand, perhaps, turned on, in a million rooms
All over the world. But now if they should speak,
If on a sudden they should speak again,
If on the stroke of noon a voice should speak,
We would not listen, we would not let it bring
That old bad world that swallowed its children quick
At one great gulp. We would not have it again.
Sometimes we think of the nations lying asleep,
Curled blindly in impenetrable sorrow,
And then the thought confounds us with its strangeness.
The tractors lie about our fields; at evening
They look like dank sea-monsters couched and waiting.
We leave them where they are and let them rust:
'They'll molder away and be like other loam.'
We make our oxen drag our rusty plows,
Long laid aside. We have gone back
Far past our fathers' land.
And then, that evening
Late in the summer the strange horses came.
We heard a distant tapping on the road,
A deepening drumming; it stopped, went on again
And at the corner changed to hollow thunder.
We saw the heads
Like a wild wave charging and were afraid.
We had sold our horses in our fathers' time
To buy new tractors. Now they were strange to us
As fabulous steeds set on an ancient shield.
Or illustrations in a book of knights.
We did not dare go near them. Yet they waited,
Stubborn and shy, as if they had been sent
By an old command to find our whereabouts
And that long-lost archaic companionship.
In the first moment we had never a thought
That they were creatures to be owned and used.
Among them were some half a dozen colts
Dropped in some wilderness of the broken world,
Yet new as if they had come from their own Eden.
Since then they have pulled our plows and borne our loads
But that free servitude still can pierce our hearts.
Our life is changed; their coming our beginning.

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Anything Will Do to Do That, Right?

Anything will do to do that, right?
Anything to keep desires flavored fresh.
It doesn't matter the sources,
Or where those resources come from, either.
You're in this for the show of things...
And you want those 'things' you got
Kept to keep on showing!

Anything will do to do that, right?
A career is too long to achieve.
You're waiting for one to come like magic.
Just for the money,
To splurge on worthless wants
And claimed needs.

So you're looking through the classifieds?
Hoping to find something that makes you qualified...
To sit with nothing at all to do,
As you play around with numbers
Thinking of clever ways to pay the bills...
And purchase something new to impress co-workers,
Family, friends and debt collectors too!

Anything will do to do that, right?

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Where Babies Come From

For my eighth birthday
I got a toy train set
my father helped assemble.

My job was to hand him
pieces of track and re-light
the cigarettes that went out

in his mouth. Halfway
through, I asked him
where babies come from.

He told me that eight years
ago today I showed up
on the front stoop

in a cardboard box, how
he spent the whole afternoon
putting me together,

just like this train set,
that I was probably lucky
the box arrived on a Saturday.

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I Like This To Be Just Mine

what used not to hurt
begins to feel

you keep it inside
hoping that it will just shrink

and be gone
it spreads and you hide it with a

scarf or a hood
it spreads some more like a woman's long


black hair which the wind catches
that smell that it brings to the sea

to another island
where the one who really loves you

smells and comes back to take you
away from me

as i get stuck on the mud of my own feet
deceived by the fairies of

my own pride
slowly eating me like the pizza

with cheese still hanging on your chin
waiting to be cleaned

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Thee, God, I Come from

Thee, God, I come from, to thee go,
All day long I like fountain flow
From thy hand out, swayed about
Mote-like in thy mighty glow.

What I know of thee I bless,
As acknowledging thy stress
On my being and as seeing
Something of thy holiness.

Once I turned from thee and hid,
Bound on what thou hadst forbid;
Sow the wind I would; I sinned:
I repent of what I did.

Bad I am, but yet thy child.
Father, be thou reconciled.
Spare thou me, since I see
With thy might that thou art mild.

I have life before me still
And thy purpose to fulfil;
Yea a debt to pay thee yet:
Help me, sir, and so I will.

But thou bidst, and just thou art,
Me shew mercy from my heart
Towards my brother, every other
Man my mate and counterpart.
. . . . . . . .

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Where does love come from?

I wanna know where love comes from
I know he is a guy, I know she is a girl
But they are just another boys and girls for me
I wanna know where love comes from
I know he is an attractive man and its nice when he’s around
I know she is kind and has beautiful smile too
But they are just another beautiful couple for me
I wanna know where love comes from
I know he could be relied on when there’s trouble
I know she never leaves her crying friend alone
But there should be lot of people like them
And why do they become together?
Is it because the perfect time to strike
When cupid finally blows its arrow?
Is it because they have correct puzzle of heart
And find their soul mate each other?
Is it because they have been lonely
And feeling peace when together?
Is it because fate entwined, cosmic coincidence, body chemistry, mutual agreement or something else I don’t know?
But there are lots of same love story about that
And I don’t’ understand yet
Where love come from between them

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Where I Come From

Well I was rollin wheels and shiftin gears
round that jersey turnpike
When barney stopped me with his gun
Ten minutes after midnight
Said sir you broke the limit in this rusty ol truck
I dont know about that accent son
Just where did you come from
I said where I come from
Its cornbread and chicken
Where I come from a lotta front porch sitiin
Where I come from tryin to make a livin
And workin hard to get to heaven
Where I come from
Well I was south of detroit city
I pulled in this country kitchen
To try their brand of barbecue
The sign said finger-lickin
Well I paid the tab and the lady aked me
Howd you like my biscuit
Ill be honest with you maam
It aint like mama fixed it
Cause where I come from
Its cornbread and chicken
Where I come from a lotta front porch pickin
Where I come from tryin to make a livin
And workin hard to get to heaven
Where I come from
I was chasin sun on 101
Somewhere around ventura
I lost a universal joint and I had to use my finger
This tall lady stopped and asked
If I had plans for dinner
Said no thanks maam, back home
We like the girls that sing soprano
Cause where I come from
Its cornbread and chicken
Where I come from a lotta front porch sitiin
Where I come from tryin to make a livin
And workin hard to get to heaven
Where I come from
Well I was headed home on 65
Somewhere around kentucky
The cb rang for a bobtail rig
Thats rollin on like thunder
Well I answered him and he asked me
Arent you from out in tulsa
No, but you mighta seen me there
I just dropped a load of salsa
Where I come from its cornbread and chicken
Where I come from a lotta front porch pickin
Where I come from tryin to make a livin
Workin hard to get to heaven
Where I come from
Where I come from yeah its cornbread and chicken
Where I come from a lotta back porch pickin
Where I come from tryin to make a livin
Workin hard to get to heaven
Where I come from
Yeah where I come from
A lotta front porch sitiin
Starin up at heaven
Where I come from
Where I come from
Tryin to make a livin
Tryin to make a livin
Oh, where I come from
Where I come from
Yeah where I come from
Get back down there sometimes
Where I come from

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Where Do Babies Come From? -Mother to Daughter

She turns 11 tomorrow.
and she says to me:

'Do babies come really
from there? '

That finger was much too low;
not my belly
but way below
and I froze-
between the lie
and her need to know
truth.

She,
eyes wide
'do they really come
from your thingie? '
I said
'yes, but...'
She interrupted
eyes wide
'but that's too small'

I could she her measuring
a little baby
with her tiny thingie
and she asked
'how can it come out?
'
'It'll stretch' I said
'don't worry
people have babies every day.'

'Did you stretch? ' she said.
'Yes, I did and you came out fine.'

Her eyes darted low
trying to visualize.

'Did it hurt? '

'Well yes but you know dear
I had some drugs and it was ok.
'
'Like aspirin? '
'Yes, sort of like aspirin but
much stronger.'

'So is there is pain..nnn? '
She stretched the word out.

'Yes, there is
but aspirin drugs
make it so it is not so bad.'

She said
'And that's because it goes inside? '

'What? '

'The baby comes because the boy's
thingie
goes inside your thingie? '

'Goes inside? '
I said

'Yes, does the boy thingie go inside the girl's thingie?

Inside' she repeated for emphasis.

'Well yes, if they are in love. That should only happen if they
are in love and married.'

'Oh.'

'If they are not married or in love does that mean a baby won't come? '

'Well, yes a baby can come even if they are not married or in love.'

'Mom' she said her eyes really wide. It goes inside? '

'Yes, '

'Does it hurt? '

'Well at first, it does hurt but after a while it feels good.'

'After a while-'

You mean you have to do it again so as to make it stop hurting? '

No, not exactly, I mean after a while you get used to it and it doesn't hurt.'

'What does it feel like? '

Huh? Feel like?

'Feel like, you know, feel like.'

'Oh, ' I said 'that is very private.

Only you and your husband should know
what it feels like but I can tell you it is very special.
A very special feeling
unlike any thing in the world.'

'Anything in the world? '

Yes, very special. It is God's way of making a baby and you know how
special babies are.'

She nodded.

And so my daughter learned from me
what her biology was telling her,
what those feelings inside meant
and I pray she has her special day,
her special tomorrow
with something special
that she will recall from me.

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That, That Is

Anderson/Howe/Squire/White)
I.TOGETHERNESS (Instrumental)
II.CROSSFIRE
Julie's sick and tired of her job n'all the reasons lately
She took it out on God and laid her soul to hell and let the baby die
Julie's child was born without a need or a reason for being
She took it as a message from a real and a distant life
Shirley gets to help her with the child though she's strung out on crack
time
Shirley never knew what it was to be held in real love
Together getting high to get to mess up their night
Anything to get up so they're losing their mind
Just to get high, breaking out from this life, gotta get them a drug to get
higher
Julie gets to walking out and drags the child, says "come on"
How we'll walk in the dark of morning
Cars screaming round the corner, drugged to heaven, guns are loaded, locked
in vengeance
Who shoots the child?
Watching in the ghetto is the spine and the cruel of the gang life
Sign language of the get go you get in the gang life
Fear the only law, fear is all we hear about,
Feed us in tha raw, fear is all we fear about,
Listen, get up, quickly get up, get up
It's the answer to punishement given you
Don't give us reasons,
Caught i the crossfire dying
God give us reasons,
Don't give a reason, God give a reason
Why lay dead a child's life?
III.THE GIVING THINGS
That talk is just a worry and a worry in a man
That life is just a worrying and getting in a mess
That deal is just awakening his spirit to be giving him
The pleasure of the giving things within
This day is of a meeting of the manner to be borne
And like a ship you come safely to the shore of love eternal
IV.THAT IS
That talk is just a worry and a worry in a man
That life is just a worrying and getting in a mess
That deal is just awakening his spirit to be giving him
The pleasure of the giving things within
That word is in it, that talk is in it
This day is of a meeting of the manner to be borne
And like a ship you come safely to the shore of love eternal
That beat is of the wanting of the where you're going
That street talk is the basis of the push and shove
They never told you that you have the right
The spirit of the angel, angels sing "Shaava, shava, shava.
Shaava"
They be waiting for you, they be asking for you
We depending on you, we depending on the healing of the structure centre
Until you reach and touch your own redemption
They never give you a reason, they never give you a reason
They never give you a, give you a, give you a, give you a reason
V.ALL IN ALL
All in all the wisdom call, you shall be young, you shall be free
Watching for the signals that some easily
Take it as a point of love, a reference place to where you are
Every step a step to set you free
All for the sake and the calling of light
Ask as you give, as you measure in time
All in all this will to give, this sacrament, this need to live
Take it a step to bring love easily
All in all the wisdom call, you shall be young, you shall be free
Waiting for the waiting to be free
Talk is the easy end, everyone heard
Ask as you seek the clear, ask and you can
This play is of a myriad of conscience sitting
This day is of a special way of love relating
This sight is in it, this way is in it, the dream is of the positive to
make you
Wonder
How did heaven begin?
This time is in it, this thought is in it, this light is in it,
When you see, you get it
All in all the wisdom call, you shall be young, you shall be free
Take it as it comes so easily
We'll be there beside the sign, the wherewithal, this will to be,
Bringing all the love that's meant to be
All in all we shall be young, we shall be free, we shall be there
All in all this time is meant to be
VI.HOW DID HEAVEN BEGIN
These days are just a worry to the children of the world
These days are just a worry to the children of the world
How did heaven begin?
How did heaven begin?
VII.AGREE TO AGREE
Don't imagine any way, so any fool can take away the drugs and the pressure
Asking for the level where a world divides its answers
To the gang lords of evil life, they can't show you how
Look upon this life as just a picture you are painting
There is a reason for this being
Look upon this place as just a part of all that is
It is a spiritual part of being
Live with the power, you can be the strength it is
Walk among the living, you can be the strength it is
To give, to live, this hope, comes through,
It takes the trust to agree this agreement
Live for the breaking free
Live for the breaknig freedom
Just let it come through come through

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That, That Is

Anderson/Howe/Squire/White)
I.TOGETHERNESS (Instrumental)
II.CROSSFIRE
Julie's sick and tired of her job n'all the reasons lately
She took it out on God and laid her soul to hell and let the baby die
Julie's child was born without a need or a reason for being
She took it as a message from a real and a distant life
Shirley gets to help her with the child though she's strung out on crack
time
Shirley never knew what it was to be held in real love
Together getting high to get to mess up their night
Anything to get up so they're losing their mind
Just to get high, breaking out from this life, gotta get them a drug to get
higher
Julie gets to walking out and drags the child, says "come on"
How we'll walk in the dark of morning
Cars screaming round the corner, drugged to heaven, guns are loaded, locked
in vengeance
Who shoots the child?
Watching in the ghetto is the spine and the cruel of the gang life
Sign language of the get go you get in the gang life
Fear the only law, fear is all we hear about,
Feed us in tha raw, fear is all we fear about,
Listen, get up, quickly get up, get up
It's the answer to punishement given you
Don't give us reasons,
Caught i the crossfire dying
God give us reasons,
Don't give a reason, God give a reason
Why lay dead a child's life?
III.THE GIVING THINGS
That talk is just a worry and a worry in a man
That life is just a worrying and getting in a mess
That deal is just awakening his spirit to be giving him
The pleasure of the giving things within
This day is of a meeting of the manner to be borne
And like a ship you come safely to the shore of love eternal
IV.THAT IS
That talk is just a worry and a worry in a man
That life is just a worrying and getting in a mess
That deal is just awakening his spirit to be giving him
The pleasure of the giving things within
That word is in it, that talk is in it
This day is of a meeting of the manner to be borne
And like a ship you come safely to the shore of love eternal
That beat is of the wanting of the where you're going
That street talk is the basis of the push and shove
They never told you that you have the right
The spirit of the angel, angels sing "Shaava, shava, shava.
Shaava"
They be waiting for you, they be asking for you
We depending on you, we depending on the healing of the structure centre
Until you reach and touch your own redemption
They never give you a reason, they never give you a reason
They never give you a, give you a, give you a, give you a reason
V.ALL IN ALL
All in all the wisdom call, you shall be young, you shall be free
Watching for the signals that some easily
Take it as a point of love, a reference place to where you are
Every step a step to set you free
All for the sake and the calling of light
Ask as you give, as you measure in time
All in all this will to give, this sacrament, this need to live
Take it a step to bring love easily
All in all the wisdom call, you shall be young, you shall be free
Waiting for the waiting to be free
Talk is the easy end, everyone heard
Ask as you seek the clear, ask and you can
This play is of a myriad of conscience sitting
This day is of a special way of love relating
This sight is in it, this way is in it, the dream is of the positive to
make you
Wonder
How did heaven begin?
This time is in it, this thought is in it, this light is in it,
When you see, you get it
All in all the wisdom call, you shall be young, you shall be free
Take it as it comes so easily
We'll be there beside the sign, the wherewithal, this will to be,
Bringing all the love that's meant to be
All in all we shall be young, we shall be free, we shall be there
All in all this time is meant to be
VI.HOW DID HEAVEN BEGIN
These days are just a worry to the children of the world
These days are just a worry to the children of the world
How did heaven begin?
How did heaven begin?
VII.AGREE TO AGREE
Don't imagine any way, so any fool can take away the drugs and the pressure
Asking for the level where a world divides its answers
To the gang lords of evil life, they can't show you how
Look upon this life as just a picture you are painting
There is a reason for this being
Look upon this place as just a part of all that is
It is a spiritual part of being
Live with the power, you can be the strength it is
Walk among the living, you can be the strength it is
To give, to live, this hope, comes through,
It takes the trust to agree this agreement
Live for the breaking free
Live for the breaknig freedom
Just let it come through come through

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Geoffrey Chaucer

The Nun's Priest's Tale

THE PROLOGUE.
'Ho! ' quoth the Knight, 'good sir, no more of this;
That ye have said is right enough, y-wis,* *of a surety
And muche more; for little heaviness
Is right enough to muche folk, I guess.
I say for me, it is a great disease,* *source of distress, annoyance
Where as men have been in great wealth and ease,
To hearen of their sudden fall, alas!
And the contrary is joy and great solas,* *delight, comfort
As when a man hath been in poor estate,
And climbeth up, and waxeth fortunate,
And there abideth in prosperity;
Such thing is gladsome, as it thinketh me,
And of such thing were goodly for to tell.'

'Yea,' quoth our Hoste, 'by Saint Paule's bell.
Ye say right sooth; this monk hath clapped* loud; *talked
He spake how Fortune cover'd with a cloud
I wot not what, and als' of a tragedy
Right now ye heard: and pardie no remedy
It is for to bewaile, nor complain
That that is done, and also it is pain,
As ye have said, to hear of heaviness.
Sir Monk, no more of this, so God you bless;
Your tale annoyeth all this company;
Such talking is not worth a butterfly,
For therein is there no sport nor game;
Therefore, Sir Monke, Dan Piers by your name,
I pray you heart'ly, tell us somewhat else,
For sickerly, n'ere* clinking of your bells, *were it not for the
That on your bridle hang on every side,
By heaven's king, that for us alle died,
I should ere this have fallen down for sleep,
Although the slough had been never so deep;
Then had your tale been all told in vain.
For certainly, as these clerkes sayn,
Where as a man may have no audience,
Nought helpeth it to telle his sentence.
And well I wot the substance is in me,
If anything shall well reported be.
Sir, say somewhat of hunting, I you pray.'

'Nay,' quoth the Monk, 'I have *no lust to play; * *no fondness for
Now let another tell, as I have told.' jesting*
Then spake our Host with rude speech and bold,
And said unto the Nunne's Priest anon,
'Come near, thou Priest, come hither, thou Sir John,
Tell us such thing as may our heartes glade.* *gladden
Be blithe, although thou ride upon a jade.
What though thine horse be bothe foul and lean?
If he will serve thee, reck thou not a bean;
Look that thine heart be merry evermo'.'

'Yes, Host,' quoth he, 'so may I ride or go,
But* I be merry, y-wis I will be blamed.' *unless
And right anon his tale he hath attamed* *commenced
And thus he said unto us every one,
This sweete priest, this goodly man, Sir John.

THE TALE.


A poor widow, *somedeal y-stept* in age, *somewhat advanced*
Was whilom dwelling in a poor cottage,
Beside a grove, standing in a dale.
This widow, of which I telle you my tale,
Since thilke day that she was last a wife,
In patience led a full simple life,
For little was *her chattel and her rent.* *her goods and her income*
By husbandry* of such as God her sent, *thrifty management
She found* herself, and eke her daughters two. *maintained
Three large sowes had she, and no mo';
Three kine, and eke a sheep that highte Mall.
Full sooty was her bow'r,* and eke her hall, *chamber
In which she ate full many a slender meal.
Of poignant sauce knew she never a deal.* *whit
No dainty morsel passed through her throat;
Her diet was *accordant to her cote.* *in keeping with her cottage*
Repletion her made never sick;
Attemper* diet was all her physic, *moderate
And exercise, and *hearte's suffisance.* *contentment of heart*
The goute *let her nothing for to dance,* *did not prevent her
Nor apoplexy shente* not her head. from dancing* *hurt
No wine drank she, neither white nor red:
Her board was served most with white and black,
Milk and brown bread, in which she found no lack,
Seind* bacon, and sometimes an egg or tway; *singed
For she was as it were *a manner dey.* *kind of day labourer*
A yard she had, enclosed all about
With stickes, and a drye ditch without,
In which she had a cock, hight Chanticleer;
In all the land of crowing *n'as his peer.* *was not his equal*
His voice was merrier than the merry orgon,* *organ
On masse days that in the churches gon.
Well sickerer* was his crowing in his lodge, *more punctual*
Than is a clock, or an abbay horloge.* *clock
By nature he knew each ascension
Of th' equinoctial in thilke town;
For when degrees fiftene were ascended,
Then crew he, that it might not be amended.
His comb was redder than the fine coral,
Embattell'd as it were a castle wall.
His bill was black, and as the jet it shone;
Like azure were his legges and his tone; * *toes
His nailes whiter than the lily flow'r,
And like the burnish'd gold was his colour,
This gentle cock had in his governance
Sev'n hennes, for to do all his pleasance,
Which were his sisters and his paramours,
And wondrous like to him as of colours.
Of which the fairest-hued in the throat
Was called Damoselle Partelote,
Courteous she was, discreet, and debonair,
And companiable,* and bare herself so fair, *sociable
Since the day that she sev'n night was old,
That truely she had the heart in hold
Of Chanticleer, locked in every lith; * *limb
He lov'd her so, that well was him therewith,
But such a joy it was to hear them sing,
When that the brighte sunne gan to spring,
In sweet accord, *'My lefe is fare in land.'* *my love is
For, at that time, as I have understand, gone abroad*
Beastes and birdes coulde speak and sing.

And so befell, that in a dawening,
As Chanticleer among his wives all
Sat on his perche, that was in the hall,
And next him sat this faire Partelote,
This Chanticleer gan groanen in his throat,
As man that in his dream is dretched* sore, *oppressed
And when that Partelote thus heard him roar,
She was aghast,* and saide, 'Hearte dear, *afraid
What aileth you to groan in this mannere?
Ye be a very sleeper, fy for shame! '
And he answer'd and saide thus; 'Madame,
I pray you that ye take it not agrief; * *amiss, in umbrage
By God, *me mette* I was in such mischief,** *I dreamed* **trouble
Right now, that yet mine heart is sore affright'.
Now God,' quoth he, 'my sweven* read aright *dream, vision.
And keep my body out of foul prisoun.
*Me mette,* how that I roamed up and down *I dreamed*
Within our yard, where as I saw a beast
Was like an hound, and would have *made arrest* *siezed*
Upon my body, and would have had me dead.
His colour was betwixt yellow and red;
And tipped was his tail, and both his ears,
With black, unlike the remnant of his hairs.
His snout was small, with glowing eyen tway;
Yet of his look almost for fear I dey; * *died
This caused me my groaning, doubteless.'

'Away,' quoth she, 'fy on you, hearteless! * *coward
Alas! ' quoth she, 'for, by that God above!
Now have ye lost my heart and all my love;
I cannot love a coward, by my faith.
For certes, what so any woman saith,
We all desiren, if it mighte be,
To have husbandes hardy, wise, and free,
And secret,* and no niggard nor no fool, *discreet
Nor him that is aghast* of every tool,** *afraid **rag, trifle
Nor no avantour,* by that God above! *braggart
How durste ye for shame say to your love
That anything might make you afear'd?
Have ye no manne's heart, and have a beard?
Alas! and can ye be aghast of swevenes? * *dreams
Nothing but vanity, God wot, in sweven is,
Swevens *engender of repletions,* *are caused by over-eating*
And oft of fume,* and of complexions, *drunkenness
When humours be too abundant in a wight.
Certes this dream, which ye have mette tonight,
Cometh of the great supefluity
Of youre rede cholera,* pardie, *bile
Which causeth folk to dreaden in their dreams
Of arrows, and of fire with redde beams,
Of redde beastes, that they will them bite,
Of conteke,* and of whelpes great and lite; ** *contention **little
Right as the humour of melancholy
Causeth full many a man in sleep to cry,
For fear of bulles, or of beares blake,
Or elles that black devils will them take,
Of other humours could I tell also,
That worke many a man in sleep much woe;
That I will pass as lightly as I can.
Lo, Cato, which that was so wise a man,
Said he not thus, *'Ne do no force of* dreams,' *attach no weight to*
Now, Sir,' quoth she, 'when we fly from these beams,
For Godde's love, as take some laxatife;
On peril of my soul, and of my life,
I counsel you the best, I will not lie,
That both of choler, and melancholy,
Ye purge you; and, for ye shall not tarry,
Though in this town is no apothecary,
I shall myself two herbes teache you,
That shall be for your health, and for your prow; * *profit
And in our yard the herbes shall I find,
The which have of their property by kind* *nature
To purge you beneath, and eke above.
Sire, forget not this for Godde's love;
Ye be full choleric of complexion;
Ware that the sun, in his ascension,
You finde not replete of humours hot;
And if it do, I dare well lay a groat,
That ye shall have a fever tertiane,
Or else an ague, that may be your bane,
A day or two ye shall have digestives
Of wormes, ere ye take your laxatives,
Of laurel, centaury, and fumeterere,
Or else of elder-berry, that groweth there,
Of catapuce, or of the gaitre-berries,
Or herb ivy growing in our yard, that merry is:
Pick them right as they grow, and eat them in,
Be merry, husband, for your father's kin;
Dreade no dream; I can say you no more.'

'Madame,' quoth he, 'grand mercy of your lore,
But natheless, as touching *Dan Catoun,* *Cato
That hath of wisdom such a great renown,
Though that he bade no dreames for to dread,
By God, men may in olde bookes read
Of many a man more of authority
Than ever Cato was, so may I the,* *thrive
That all the reverse say of his sentence,* *opinion
And have well founden by experience
That dreames be significations
As well of joy, as tribulations
That folk enduren in this life present.
There needeth make of this no argument;
The very preve* sheweth it indeed. *trial, experience
One of the greatest authors that men read
Saith thus, that whilom two fellowes went
On pilgrimage in a full good intent;
And happen'd so, they came into a town
Where there was such a congregatioun
Of people, and eke so *strait of herbergage,* *without lodging*
That they found not as much as one cottage
In which they bothe might y-lodged be:
Wherefore they musten of necessity,
As for that night, departe company;
And each of them went to his hostelry,* *inn
And took his lodging as it woulde fall.
The one of them was lodged in a stall,
Far in a yard, with oxen of the plough;
That other man was lodged well enow,
As was his aventure, or his fortune,
That us governeth all, as in commune.
And so befell, that, long ere it were day,
This man mette* in his bed, there: as he lay, *dreamed
How that his fellow gan upon him call,
And said, 'Alas! for in an ox's stall
This night shall I be murder'd, where I lie
Now help me, deare brother, or I die;
In alle haste come to me,' he said.
This man out of his sleep for fear abraid; * *started
But when that he was wak'd out of his sleep,
He turned him, and *took of this no keep; * *paid this no attention*
He thought his dream was but a vanity.
Thus twies* in his sleeping dreamed he, *twice
And at the thirde time yet his fellaw again
Came, as he thought, and said, 'I am now slaw; * *slain
Behold my bloody woundes, deep and wide.
Arise up early, in the morning, tide,
And at the west gate of the town,' quoth he,
'A carte full of dung there shalt: thou see,
In which my body is hid privily.
Do thilke cart arroste* boldely. *stop
My gold caused my murder, sooth to sayn.'
And told him every point how he was slain,
With a full piteous face, and pale of hue.

'And, truste well, his dream he found full true;
For on the morrow, as soon as it was day,
To his fellowes inn he took his way;
And when that he came to this ox's stall,
After his fellow he began to call.
The hostelere answered him anon,
And saide, 'Sir, your fellow is y-gone,
As soon as day he went out of the town.'
This man gan fallen in suspicioun,
Rememb'ring on his dreames that he mette,* *dreamed
And forth he went, no longer would he let,* *delay
Unto the west gate of the town, and fand* *found
A dung cart, as it went for to dung land,
That was arrayed in the same wise
As ye have heard the deade man devise; * *describe
And with an hardy heart he gan to cry,
'Vengeance and justice of this felony:
My fellow murder'd in this same night
And in this cart he lies, gaping upright.
I cry out on the ministers,' quoth he.
'That shoulde keep and rule this city;
Harow! alas! here lies my fellow slain.'
What should I more unto this tale sayn?
The people out start, and cast the cart to ground
And in the middle of the dung they found
The deade man, that murder'd was all new.
O blissful God! that art so good and true,
Lo, how that thou bewray'st murder alway.
Murder will out, that see we day by day.
Murder is so wlatsom* and abominable *loathsome
To God, that is so just and reasonable,
That he will not suffer it heled* be; *concealed
Though it abide a year, or two, or three,
Murder will out, this is my conclusioun,
And right anon, the ministers of the town
Have hent* the carter, and so sore him pined,** *seized **tortured
And eke the hostelere so sore engined,* *racked
That they beknew* their wickedness anon, *confessed
And were hanged by the necke bone.

'Here may ye see that dreames be to dread.
And certes in the same book I read,
Right in the nexte chapter after this
(I gabbe* not, so have I joy and bliss) , *talk idly
Two men that would, have passed over sea,
For certain cause, into a far country,
If that the wind not hadde been contrary,
That made them in a city for to tarry,
That stood full merry upon an haven side;
But on a day, against the even-tide,
The wind gan change, and blew right *as them lest.* *as they wished*
Jolly and glad they wente to their rest,
And caste* them full early for to sail. *resolved
But to the one man fell a great marvail
That one of them, in sleeping as he lay,
He mette* a wondrous dream, against the day: *dreamed
He thought a man stood by his bedde's side,
And him commanded that he should abide;
And said him thus; 'If thou to-morrow wend,
Thou shalt be drown'd; my tale is at an end.'
He woke, and told his follow what he mette,
And prayed him his voyage for to let; * *delay
As for that day, he pray'd him to abide.
His fellow, that lay by his bedde's side,
Gan for to laugh, and scorned him full fast.
'No dream,' quoth he,'may so my heart aghast,* *frighten
That I will lette* for to do my things.* *delay
I sette not a straw by thy dreamings,
For swevens* be but vanities and japes.** *dreams **jokes,deceits
Men dream all day of owles and of apes,
And eke of many a maze* therewithal; *wild imagining
Men dream of thing that never was, nor shall.
But since I see, that thou wilt here abide,
And thus forslothe* wilfully thy tide,** *idle away **time
God wot, *it rueth me; * and have good day.' *I am sorry for it*
And thus he took his leave, and went his way.
But, ere that he had half his course sail'd,
I know not why, nor what mischance it ail'd,
But casually* the ship's bottom rent, *by accident
And ship and man under the water went,
In sight of other shippes there beside
That with him sailed at the same tide.

'And therefore, faire Partelote so dear,
By such examples olde may'st thou lear,* *learn
That no man shoulde be too reckeless
Of dreames, for I say thee doubteless,
That many a dream full sore is for to dread.
Lo, in the life of Saint Kenelm I read,
That was Kenulphus' son, the noble king
Of Mercenrike, how Kenelm mette a thing.
A little ere he was murder'd on a day,
His murder in his vision he say.* *saw
His norice* him expounded every deal** *nurse **part
His sweven, and bade him to keep* him well *guard
For treason; but he was but seven years old,
And therefore *little tale hath he told* *he attached little
Of any dream, so holy was his heart. significance to*
By God, I hadde lever than my shirt
That ye had read his legend, as have I.
Dame Partelote, I say you truely,
Macrobius, that wrote the vision
In Afric' of the worthy Scipion,
Affirmeth dreames, and saith that they be
'Warnings of thinges that men after see.
And furthermore, I pray you looke well
In the Old Testament, of Daniel,
If he held dreames any vanity.
Read eke of Joseph, and there shall ye see
Whether dreams be sometimes (I say not all)
Warnings of thinges that shall after fall.
Look of Egypt the king, Dan Pharaoh,
His baker and his buteler also,
Whether they felte none effect* in dreams. *significance
Whoso will seek the acts of sundry remes* *realms
May read of dreames many a wondrous thing.
Lo Croesus, which that was of Lydia king,
Mette he not that he sat upon a tree,
Which signified he shoulde hanged be?
Lo here, Andromache, Hectore's wife,
That day that Hector shoulde lose his life,
She dreamed on the same night beforn,
How that the life of Hector should be lorn,* *lost
If thilke day he went into battaile;
She warned him, but it might not avail;
He wente forth to fighte natheless,
And was y-slain anon of Achilles.
But thilke tale is all too long to tell;
And eke it is nigh day, I may not dwell.
Shortly I say, as for conclusion,
That I shall have of this avision
Adversity; and I say furthermore,
That I ne *tell of laxatives no store,* *hold laxatives
For they be venomous, I wot it well; of no value*
I them defy,* I love them never a del.** *distrust **whit

'But let us speak of mirth, and stint* all this; *cease
Madame Partelote, so have I bliss,
Of one thing God hath sent me large* grace; liberal
For when I see the beauty of your face,
Ye be so scarlet-hued about your eyen,
I maketh all my dreade for to dien,
For, all so sicker* as In principio, *certain
Mulier est hominis confusio.
Madam, the sentence* of of this Latin is, *meaning
Woman is manne's joy and manne's bliss.
For when I feel at night your softe side, -
Albeit that I may not on you ride,
For that our perch is made so narrow, Alas!
I am so full of joy and of solas,* *delight
That I defy both sweven and eke dream.'
And with that word he flew down from the beam,
For it was day, and eke his hennes all;
And with a chuck he gan them for to call,
For he had found a corn, lay in the yard.
Royal he was, he was no more afear'd;
He feather'd Partelote twenty time,
And as oft trode her, ere that it was prime.
He looked as it were a grim lion,
And on his toes he roamed up and down;
He deigned not to set his feet to ground;
He chucked, when he had a corn y-found,
And to him ranne then his wives all.
Thus royal, as a prince is in his hall,
Leave I this Chanticleer in his pasture;
And after will I tell his aventure.

When that the month in which the world began,
That highte March, when God first maked man,
Was complete, and y-passed were also,
Since March ended, thirty days and two,
Befell that Chanticleer in all his pride,
His seven wives walking him beside,
Cast up his eyen to the brighte sun,
That in the sign of Taurus had y-run
Twenty degrees and one, and somewhat more;
He knew by kind,* and by none other lore,** *nature **learning
That it was prime, and crew with blissful steven.* *voice
'The sun,' he said, 'is clomben up in heaven
Twenty degrees and one, and more y-wis.* *assuredly
Madame Partelote, my worlde's bliss,
Hearken these blissful birdes how they sing,
And see the freshe flowers how they spring;
Full is mine heart of revel and solace.'
But suddenly him fell a sorrowful case; * *casualty
For ever the latter end of joy is woe:
God wot that worldly joy is soon y-go:
And, if a rhetor* coulde fair indite, *orator
He in a chronicle might it safely write,
As for *a sov'reign notability* *a thing supremely notable*
Now every wise man, let him hearken me;
This story is all as true, I undertake,
As is the book of Launcelot du Lake,
That women hold in full great reverence.
Now will I turn again to my sentence.

A col-fox, full of sly iniquity,
That in the grove had wonned* yeares three, *dwelt
By high imagination forecast,
The same night thorough the hedges brast* *burst
Into the yard, where Chanticleer the fair
Was wont, and eke his wives, to repair;
And in a bed of wortes* still he lay, *cabbages
Till it was passed undern of the day,
Waiting his time on Chanticleer to fall:
As gladly do these homicides all,
That in awaite lie to murder men.
O false murd'rer! Rouking* in thy den! *crouching, lurking
O new Iscariot, new Ganilion!
O false dissimuler, O Greek Sinon,
That broughtest Troy all utterly to sorrow!
O Chanticleer! accursed be the morrow
That thou into thy yard flew from the beams; * *rafters
Thou wert full well y-warned by thy dreams
That thilke day was perilous to thee.
But what that God forewot* must needes be, *foreknows
After th' opinion of certain clerkes.
Witness on him that any perfect clerk is,
That in school is great altercation
In this matter, and great disputation,
And hath been of an hundred thousand men.
But I ne cannot *boult it to the bren,* *examine it thoroughly *
As can the holy doctor Augustine,
Or Boece, or the bishop Bradwardine,
Whether that Godde's worthy foreweeting* *foreknowledge
*Straineth me needly* for to do a thing *forces me*
(Needly call I simple necessity) ,
Or elles if free choice be granted me
To do that same thing, or do it not,
Though God forewot* it ere that it was wrought; *knew in advance
Or if *his weeting straineth never a deal,* *his knowing constrains
But by necessity conditionel. not at all*
I will not have to do of such mattere;
My tale is of a cock, as ye may hear,
That took his counsel of his wife, with sorrow,
To walken in the yard upon the morrow
That he had mette the dream, as I you told.
Womane's counsels be full often cold; * *mischievous, unwise
Womane's counsel brought us first to woe,
And made Adam from Paradise to go,
There as he was full merry and well at case.
But, for I n'ot* to whom I might displease *know not
If I counsel of women woulde blame,
Pass over, for I said it in my game.* *jest
Read authors, where they treat of such mattere
And what they say of women ye may hear.
These be the cocke's wordes, and not mine;
I can no harm of no woman divine.* *conjecture, imagine
Fair in the sand, to bathe* her merrily, *bask
Lies Partelote, and all her sisters by,
Against the sun, and Chanticleer so free
Sang merrier than the mermaid in the sea;
For Physiologus saith sickerly,* *certainly
How that they singe well and merrily.
And so befell that, as he cast his eye
Among the wortes,* on a butterfly, *cabbages
He was ware of this fox that lay full low.
Nothing *ne list him thenne* for to crow, *he had no inclination*
But cried anon 'Cock! cock! ' and up he start,
As man that was affrayed in his heart.
For naturally a beast desireth flee
From his contrary,* if be may it see, *enemy
Though he *ne'er erst* had soon it with his eye *never before*
This Chanticleer, when he gan him espy,
He would have fled, but that the fox anon
Said, 'Gentle Sir, alas! why will ye gon?
Be ye afraid of me that am your friend?
Now, certes, I were worse than any fiend,
If I to you would harm or villainy.
I am not come your counsel to espy.
But truely the cause of my coming
Was only for to hearken how ye sing;
For truely ye have as merry a steven,* *voice
As any angel hath that is in heaven;
Therewith ye have of music more feeling,
Than had Boece, or any that can sing.
My lord your father (God his soule bless)
And eke your mother of her gentleness,
Have in mnine house been, to my great ease:* *satisfaction
And certes, Sir, full fain would I you please.
But, for men speak of singing, I will say,
So may I brooke* well mine eyen tway, *enjoy, possess, or use
Save you, I hearde never man so sing
As did your father in the morrowning.
Certes it was of heart all that he sung.
And, for to make his voice the more strong,
He would *so pain him,* that with both his eyen *make such an exertion*
He muste wink, so loud he woulde cryen,
And standen on his tiptoes therewithal,
And stretche forth his necke long and small.
And eke he was of such discretion,
That there was no man, in no region,
That him in song or wisdom mighte pass.
I have well read in Dan Burnel the Ass,
Among his verse, how that there was a cock
That, for* a prieste's son gave him a knock *because
Upon his leg, while he was young and nice,* *foolish
He made him for to lose his benefice.
But certain there is no comparison
Betwixt the wisdom and discretion
Of youre father, and his subtilty.
Now singe, Sir, for sainte charity,
Let see, can ye your father counterfeit? '

This Chanticleer his wings began to beat,
As man that could not his treason espy,
So was he ravish'd with his flattery.
Alas! ye lordes, many a false flattour* *flatterer
Is in your court, and many a losengeour, * *deceiver
That please you well more, by my faith,
Than he that soothfastness* unto you saith. *truth
Read in Ecclesiast' of flattery;
Beware, ye lordes, of their treachery.
This Chanticleer stood high upon his toes,
Stretching his neck, and held his eyen close,
And gan to crowe loude for the nonce
And Dan Russel the fox start up at once,
And *by the gorge hente* Chanticleer, *seized by the throat*
And on his back toward the wood him bare.
For yet was there no man that him pursu'd.
O destiny, that may'st not be eschew'd! * *escaped
Alas, that Chanticleer flew from the beams!
Alas, his wife raughte* nought of dreams! *regarded
And on a Friday fell all this mischance.
O Venus, that art goddess of pleasance,
Since that thy servant was this Chanticleer
And in thy service did all his powere,
More for delight, than the world to multiply,
Why wilt thou suffer him on thy day to die?
O Gaufrid, deare master sovereign,
That, when thy worthy king Richard was slain
With shot, complainedest his death so sore,
Why n'had I now thy sentence and thy lore,
The Friday for to chiden, as did ye?
(For on a Friday, soothly, slain was he) ,
Then would I shew you how that I could plain* *lament
For Chanticleere's dread, and for his pain.

Certes such cry nor lamentation
Was ne'er of ladies made, when Ilion
Was won, and Pyrrhus with his straighte sword,
When he had hent* king Priam by the beard, *seized
And slain him (as saith us Eneidos*) , *The Aeneid
As maden all the hennes in the close,* *yard
When they had seen of Chanticleer the sight.
But sov'reignly* Dame Partelote shright,** *above all others
Full louder than did Hasdrubale's wife, **shrieked
When that her husband hadde lost his life,
And that the Romans had y-burnt Carthage;
She was so full of torment and of rage,
That wilfully into the fire she start,
And burnt herselfe with a steadfast heart.
O woeful hennes! right so cried ye,
As, when that Nero burned the city
Of Rome, cried the senatores' wives,
For that their husbands losten all their lives;
Withoute guilt this Nero hath them slain.
Now will I turn unto my tale again;

The sely* widow, and her daughters two, *simple, honest
Hearde these hennes cry and make woe,
And at the doors out started they anon,
And saw the fox toward the wood is gone,
And bare upon his back the cock away:
They cried, 'Out! harow! and well-away!
Aha! the fox! ' and after him they ran,
And eke with staves many another man
Ran Coll our dog, and Talbot, and Garland;
And Malkin, with her distaff in her hand
Ran cow and calf, and eke the very hogges
So fear'd they were for barking of the dogges,
And shouting of the men and women eke.
They ranne so, them thought their hearts would break.
They yelled as the fiendes do in hell;
The duckes cried as men would them quell; * *kill, destroy
The geese for feare flewen o'er the trees,
Out of the hive came the swarm of bees,
So hideous was the noise, ben'dicite!
Certes he, Jacke Straw, and his meinie,* *followers
Ne made never shoutes half so shrill
When that they woulden any Fleming kill,
As thilke day was made upon the fox.
Of brass they broughte beames* and of box, *trumpets
Of horn and bone, in which they blew and pooped,* **tooted
And therewithal they shrieked and they hooped;
It seemed as the heaven shoulde fall

Now, goode men, I pray you hearken all;
Lo, how Fortune turneth suddenly
The hope and pride eke of her enemy.
This cock, that lay upon the fox's back,
In all his dread unto the fox he spake,
And saide, 'Sir, if that I were as ye,
Yet would I say (as wisly* God help me) , *surely
'Turn ye again, ye proude churles all;
A very pestilence upon you fall.
Now am I come unto the woode's side,
Maugre your head, the cock shall here abide;
I will him eat, in faith, and that anon.''
The fox answer'd, 'In faith it shall be done:'
And, as he spake the word, all suddenly
The cock brake from his mouth deliverly,* *nimbly
And high upon a tree he flew anon.
And when the fox saw that the cock was gone,
'Alas! ' quoth he, 'O Chanticleer, alas!
I have,' quoth he, 'y-done to you trespass,* *offence
Inasmuch as I maked you afear'd,
When I you hent,* and brought out of your yard; *took
But, Sir, I did it in no wick' intent;
Come down, and I shall tell you what I meant.
I shall say sooth to you, God help me so.'
'Nay then,' quoth he, 'I shrew* us both the two, *curse
And first I shrew myself, both blood and bones,
If thou beguile me oftener than once.
Thou shalt no more through thy flattery
Do* me to sing and winke with mine eye; *cause
For he that winketh when he shoulde see,
All wilfully, God let him never the.'* *thrive
'Nay,' quoth the fox; 'but God give him mischance
That is so indiscreet of governance,
That jangleth* when that he should hold his peace.' *chatters

Lo, what it is for to be reckeless
And negligent, and trust on flattery.
But ye that holde this tale a folly,
As of a fox, or of a cock or hen,
Take the morality thereof, good men.
For Saint Paul saith, That all that written is,
*To our doctrine it written is y-wis.* *is surely written for
Take the fruit, and let the chaff be still. our instruction*

Now goode God, if that it be thy will,
As saith my Lord, so make us all good men;
And bring us all to thy high bliss. Amen.

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I Have Learned From Similar Experiences

If it should seem,
I appear to be free...
To laugh with happiness.
And share with others,
An empathy felt that is deep.
With a tear to dropp from my eyes,
Quickly.
But not to turn on with a full weeping.
I have learned from similar experiences,
Earned.
And now I can express with acknowlegement,
I have grown to yearn for more of this life to live.

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Where Do You Come From?

(words & music by ruth batchelor - bob roberts)
Where do you come from?
Tell me who you are
Do you come from another world
Or from some distant star?
Where do you come from?
Are you what you seem?
Are you real,
Are you standing there,
Or is it just a dream?
Tell me more about yourself
Do you feel the way I feel?
Are you just a vision,
Or are you really real?
Where do you come from?
Angel wont you say?
Tell me all that there is to know
And tell me that youll stay.

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From The Experiences She's Had

In broken English she spoke about the Taliban
The ex refugee from war torn Afghanistan
Their rule to say the least was quite austere
And all Afghan women of them lived in fear.

But she added the Northern Alliance when they ruled just as bad
And their feuding Warlords dangerous and mad
And they rule again in Afghanistan today
But the leopard never changes his spots or so they say.

Things in Afghanistan still seem far from okay
And for her war ravaged Homeland the Afghan migrant pray
But she feels happy that she at last is free
Of discrimination, oppression and poverty.

Her knowledge comes from the experiences she's had
And she says the Northern Alliance as the Taliban just as bad
And from a village north of Kabul her life's journey began
The noble woman from Afghanistan.

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The Gifts That Come From The Heart

Memories so sweet they don't depart,
Because each stays sublime,
It's the gifts that come from the heart
That stand the test of time...
Like that first kiss upon the cheek,
Before lips melt with love,
Such heartfelt gifts must be unique,
What else could prove enough?

Some think gold rings or gems will do,
Or flowers for a while,
While others hold the point of view,
Whatever makes them smile...
Yet heartfelt gifts mean so much more,
For these were meant to please...
They have enchantments to allure,
Somehow they grant you peace...

To think that someone truly cares,
Loves tenderly and free,
Holds nothing back and nothing spares
And shares incredibly...
God-blessed are those who play it smart,
That simply says it all...
With the gifts that come from the heart,
For love is beautiful...


Denis Martindale, copyright, January 2011.

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I am told that we are just animals

I am told that we are just animals
and like all other species
perform the tasks
and eat, live and die
and that this life is all that we have.

Still this humanoid sees
the grandeur of the sunrise
and how it burst through the clouds
in different colours
and there’s something utterly great in it.

I am told that subconsciously apes may equate
the sunrise with the colour
of some ripe fruit,
but I see a master creator’s hand there
and no hunger stirs in me.

I am told that we are just animals
and still I am aware of myself
and my place in this life
and how infinite small
I am against the Supreme God
and of the values and laws
that protects me
and of the education
that set my career on its way.

I am told that we are just animals
and yet I have the capacity
to reason, to comprehend,
to speak, to calculate
and to plan
and believe that I am rather
a human being called man.

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Where Did You Come From?

Where did you come from?
And how did you manage...
To lift your tender petals,
Up through the cracks...
Born of steel and cemented,
Dispositions.
Surrounding the corolla...
Of your adorable leaves.

Where did you come from?
Are you set on committing suicide?
Do you not care,
Your beauty you can not hide.
I wish to pick you to keep you safe.
Although your bravery shown...
Seems to me so out of place.

Where did you come from?
And why do my eyes,
Fix upon you like they do?
Are you sharing with me,
I can be as brave as you?
And if you can do this...
I can too?
Is that the message you deliver?
To be as strong as possible...
No matter what I must go through?

Where did you come from?
And why do my eyes,
Fix upon you like they do?
Are you sharing with me,
I can be as brave as you?
And if you can do this...
I can too?
Is that the message you deliver?
To be as strong as possible...
No matter what I must go through?

And that is my choice to make?
To make that choice,
Is for me to choose?

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Back Where I Come From

In the town where I was raised
Clock ticks and the cattle graze
Time passed with amazing grace
Back where I come from.
You can lie on a riverbank
Paint your name on a water tank
Miss count all the beers you drank
Back where I come from.
Back where I come from,
Where Ill be when it is said and done,
Im proud as anyone thats where I come from.
We learned in a sunday school
Just who made the sun shine through
I know who made the moon shine too
Back where I come from
Blue eyes on a saturday night
Tan legs in the broad daylight
Tvs they were black and white
Back where I come from
Back where I come from,
Where Ill be when it is said and done,
Im proud as anyone thats where I come from.
Some say its a backwards place
Narrow minds on a narrow race
But I make it a point to say thats where I come from.
Thats where I come from,
Where Ill be when it is said and done,
Im proud as anyone thats where I come from.
Thats where I come from
Im an old tennesseean
I am as proud as any one thats where I come from
Back where I come from
Back where I come from
Back where I come from

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