Latest quotes | Random quotes | Vote! | Latest comments | Add quote

Always the Rose

Roses always stand for love,
But why a rose and not another?
A rose may be fair, a rose may be sweet
But its thorns are sharp, and can cut deep
Just like simple words can create a rift
That cannot be bridged, not even by love.
So why a rose, why the two-faced flower
For something we perceive as flawless?

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Related quotes

A marriage of two is for love that is true...

A marriage of two is for love that is true
A marriage of two is always something new
A marriage of two happens sometimes out of the blue

A marriage of two is worth it when it’s due
A marriage of two is a marriage of trust
They are only very few who have a clue of when love accrues

A marriage of two is about love making
It is not about money raking
You should only be glad if
A marriage of two is for love that is true

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

A Marriage Of Two Is For Love That Is True

A marriage of two is for love that is true
A marriage of two is always something new
A marriage of two happens sometimes out of the blue

A marriage of two is worth it when it’s due
A marriage of two is a marriage of trust
They are only very few who have a clue of when love accrues

A marriage of two is about love making
It is not about money raking
You should only be glad if
A marriage of two is for love that is true

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

God's Truth Will Always Stand

His truth will always stand
Though I be tossed about
By the winds of doubt

His truth will always stand
Though I close my eyes to faith
Then lie to myself that I am safe.

His truth will always stand
No matter what I do
However I am blue

His truth will always stand:
His Son's died in our place for all our sins
Past, future, and the ones we're in.

His truth will always stand:
He is a righteous but forgiving all powerful God
He can make something out of a dirt clod.

His truth will always stand--
So I will forget all which does not stay
And hope in the one who is for always.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

In It For Love

R.sambora
Life is a road
Forever winding where it leads us
I dont know
In it together
For better or worse
Searching for our pal of gold.
Time
Leaves a trail of broken hearts
So many arrows just keep missing
Their mark
Baby that aint us.
Nothing else matters
When youre in it for love
Together we can only go higher
You can reach any rainbow
Youre dreaming of
Nothing else matters at all
When youre in it for love, baby
Yeah
Well share in the laughter
Share in the tears
And the promises we keep
Life can be crazy
Love can be cruel
But its always been a two way street
You try
And give it all you have to give
So many people dont know how to forgive
Baby that aint us.
Nothing else matters
When youre in it for love
Together we can only go higher
You can reach any rainbow
Youre dreaming of
Nothing else matters at all
When youre in it for love, baby.
Solo
You try
And give it all you have to give
So many people dont know how to forgive
Baby that aint us.
Nothing else matters
When youre in it for love
Together we can only go higher
You can reach any rainbow
Youre dreaming of
Nothing else matters at all
When youre in it for love baby.
When youre in it for love baby
In it for love
When youre in it for love baby
When youre in it for love baby
When youre in it for love baby
In it for love.

song performed by Bon JoviReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

All For Love

All for love, baby
Girl what I do, Ill do it for you
All for love, baby
Baby, my love, its all for you
Oo-oh (all for love)
Oo-oh-oh (all for love)
Oo-oh (all for love)
Oo-oh-oh
Girl, youre the only one Id ever love and need
Cause when youre here with me
You make me feel complete
Girl, its too hard to swallow
To know theres no tomorrow
Without you baby
So Ill do anything or go anywhere
To tell the whole wide world that I care
With all my power, Ill give the real
Thats how I feel
For when its...
Chorus:
All for love, baby
Girl what I do, Ill do it for you
All for love, baby
Baby, my love, its all for you
Oo-oh (all for love)
Oo-oh-oh (all for love)
Oo-oh (all for love)
Oo-oh-oh
(I) Im gonna show you I can be here every day
And thats time and time again love will never end
So Ill go anywhere and do anything
(to tell the world) Ill tell the world (that I care baby)
Ill be your king, cause you are my queen, yea
Lifes a living dream
Because its...
Chorus:
All for love, baby (all for love, baby)
Girl what I do, Ill do it for you (Ill do anything for you, yea)
All for love, baby (all for love, baby)
Baby, my love, its all for you (baby, its all for you)
Breakdown:
All for you
Baby, all for you
Baby
Baby, all for you
What what
Yea yea yea
Oo-oh (all for love) (all for you)
Oo-oh-oh (all for love) (baby, all for you)
Oo-oh (all for love) (baby)
Oo-oh-oh (baby, all for you)
Whoa
Its easier said than done to love
But girl, it aint hard when youre the one (it aint hard when youre the one)
Girl, you have my heart, yea (girl, you have my heart)
Chorus:
All for love, baby (baby, yea)
Girl what I do, Ill do it for you (Ill do anything for you, yea)
All for love, baby (all for love)
Baby, my love, its all for you (cause, baby, my love, its all for you, oh)
Oo-oh
Oo-oh-oh (its all for you, oh)
Oo-oh
Oo-oh-oh (yea, yea)
All for love, baby (all for love)
cause, baby, my love, its all for you

song performed by O-townReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Dance Into My Life

Dance into my life, only for a while
Whirl me round and round
Dance me like an angel child
Hes passing through my world
He doesnt even know
Times not on my side
No word or goodbye, Ill go
So dance on, right now I want to dance on
Until the moments over
And Ill be going home
(Ill be going home)
Just dance on, right now
I want to dance on
I cant let him notice the tears in my eyes
In my eyes, in my eyes
Dance into my life
Hold the moment fast
Make believe in us
Nothing real in life can last dance within my life
Dance me to the door
I cant see the time, but the time has come for sure
So dance on, right now I want to dance on
Until the moments over
And Ill be going home
(Ill be going home)
Just dance on, right now
I want to dance on
I cant let him notice the tears in my eyes
In my eyes, in my eyes
Dance with me, dance with me
Wont you dance with me
Dance with me, dance with me
Wont you dance with me
So dance on, right now
I want to dance on
Until the moments over
And Ill be going home
(Ill be going home)
So dance on, right now
I want to dance on
Until the moments over
And Ill be going home

song performed by Donna SummerReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Waiting for love

As the heart panteth
After the water brooks
And as the fish
Is always caught by the hook
So my soul panteth after thee
My soul thirsteth for thee
Thou art my love
My true love
When shall i come
And appear before my love
My tears has been my meat
For i cant stand the heat
Whiles they continue to say unto me
Where is your love
When i remember all these things
I pour out my soul in me
For love flew with me
Like a white dove
Why art thou cast down
Oh my soul
Why art thou disquieted in me
Oh my soul
Hope, do not have fear
Wait patiently for her
For she will appear

By; matt ancient

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Fool For Love

She told me her story, hoped i would understand
And i listened closely, as anybody can
But there's a distant look that's in her eyes
And as the nights grow longer, alone in bed she cries
My baby met a man on her first date
He stole her heart an' sealed her fate
And she thought she'd found a friend for life
He wanted her but not to be a wife
* la la li, la la li
A fool for love never wonders why
La la li, la la li
She hangs on in but it's just another goodbye
** (now) every day is like another day
She lets it all drift on away
An' every man is like another man
They come and go but she never can
And from sixteen to thirty-two
She lost her loves and her good looks too
It's so sad to see at first hand
From a teenage beauty to a one night stand
* repeat
** repeat twice
[instrumental]
** repeat and fade

song performed by UfoReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

A Fool For Love

She told me her story, hoped I would understand
And I listened closely, as anybody can
But there's a distant look that's in her eyes
And as the nights grow longer, alone in bed she cries
My baby met a man on her first date
He stole her heart an' sealed her fate
And she thought she'd found a friend for life
He wanted her but not to be a wife
* La la li, la la li
A fool for love never wonders why
La la li, la la li
She hangs on in but it's just another goodbye
** (Now) every day is like another day
She lets it all drift on away
An' every man is like another man
They come and go but she never can
And from sixteen to thirty-two
She lost her loves and her good looks too
It's so sad to see at first hand
From a teenage beauty to a one night stand
* Repeat
** Repeat twice
[INSTRUMENTAL]
** Repeat and fade

song performed by UfoReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Why Do You Love Football?

Why do you love football Kevin
what do you see in it?
why not watch another sport
like Rugby, Golf, or Cricket?
Well let me answer that my friend
and put your mind at rest
I love the beautiful game
because it's simply the best.
No other sport is as exciting
no other comes anywhere near
football has lots of passion
and can create a great atmosphere.
It is loved all around the world
most children kick a football
rich kids, and poor kids,
small kids, and some very tall.
Ask a lad what he wants to be?
a footballer I bet he will say
not a cyclist or a pole vaulter
a top swimmer no way!
A good football match is a real joy
that's why thousands go to every game
when you get goals and lots of action
the fans are so glad that they came.
So yes my friend I do love my football
it's the number one sport for me
so while your watching snooker and darts
I'll be cheering on my beloved Coventry.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Substitute For Love

Written by Madonna, William Orbit, Rod McKuen, Anita Kerr and David Collins
I traded fame for love
Without a second thought
It all became a silly game
Some things cannot be bought
Got exactly what I asked for
Wanted it so badly
Running, rushing back for
more
I suffered fools
So gladly
And now I find
I've changed my mind
The face of you
My substitute for love
My substitute for love
Should I wait for you
My substitute for love
My substitute for love
I traveled round the world
Looking for a home
I found myself in crowded rooms
Feeling so alone
Had so many lovers
Who settled for the thrill
Of basking in my spotlight
I never felt
So happy
The face of you
My substitute for love
My substitute for love
Should I wait for you
My substitute for love
My substitute for love
mmmmmm
ooooooo
No famous faces, far off places
Trinkets I can buy
No handsome stranger, heady danger
Drug that I can try
No ferris wheel, no heart to steal
No laughter in the dark
No one night stand, no far off land
No fire that I can spark
mmmmm?
The face of you
My substitute for love
My substitute for love
Should I wait for you
My substitute for love
My substitute for love

song performed by MadonnaReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Stand Up For Love

Here I come again
Up against the wall
But if I dont give it everything I got baby,
It will come to nothing at all
Give it one more chance
Before I fade to black
Im fighting for my life yeah Im scared
But you know that I can never look back
They say I cant refuse
Ive got nothing left to lose
But if youre asking me to choose
Im gonna stand up for love
Baby once Im in, you know I play to win
I stand up for love
Cuz its all that I can do
I stand up for love
When I cut you down
Bet it hurt so bad
It can break your faith
And your soul like youre living in a world gone bad
When it comes back around
Rip your heart
Break you down
You gotta hold your ground
Babe, you gotta
Stand up for love
Its a chance I take
Its never too late
Stand up for love
Its the best that I can do
You gotta stand up for love
Cuz baby once youre in it, you gotta play to win it
Stand up for love
Baby Ill be good to you
Im thinking of the times when things were better babe
Im missing them, missing them
Well I never thought they would end
You know I cant refuse
I got nothing left to lose
If youre asking me to choose
Im gonna stand up for love
Its a chance Ill take
Its never too late
Stand up for love
Its the best that I can do
You gotta stand up for love
Cuz baby once youre in
Youve gotta play to win
Stand up for love
Baby Ill be good to you
Stand up for love

song performed by Rick SpringfieldReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Breaking Rules For Love

Waiting for the glory of the Vampire book at home
in which Shadowhunters live in glittering cities only
reached through secret portals, add a heroine who
has the ability to create powerful runes that give
her unheard-of power

Also add an evil clan of power-mad governors and
the recipe is perfect to delight, the debate between
choosing for justice and breaking the rules for love
continues unabated, when the cherished friend of
the hero's beloved is threatened

Our hero is ready to lie down his life, the heroine
runs around havoc following in her wake, every-
one trying to keep her safe - taxed to the end of
their endurance, her childhood friend kept from
death by the one who stole her heart

The moral crisis is fascinating and the action is
non-stop - I am breathless while reading - my
world gone, my spirit roaming in the storybook
universe, no phenomenological experience can
keep my heart chained while I'm reading

Later comes the trauma of the book ending, it
will feel as if my heart contracts painfully, but
dealing with this loss has been the story of my
life, every new book in my hands leads to yet
another heartbreak in the end

Yet I cannot stay in the small reality within which
the five senses keep us imprisoned - my whole
being yearns for those unseen landscapes of the
mind forever invisible to our physical eyes -
the dream is everything

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Cry For Love

Words & music: michael w. smith and brent bourgeois
My life is like a racing car hurtling towards the wall
At the speed of sound
My time has been so finely tuned
But Ive never seen a human being so tightly wound
At times it seems beyond belief
I just need a bit of relief
Like a war-weary soldier
Marching up and over the edge
Take my hand and pull me up cause Im falling too fast
Somehow Ive lost my way - Im cryin save me
Chorus
Can you hear me...Im calling out
Im crying out...a cry for love
I can feel you...youre touching me
You healing me...my cry for love
I will be the first to admit
I dont have the strength to handle it alone anymore
I dont have to fret, dont have to explain
All my worryings in vain
Im not alone anymore
Why is this so hard to believe
What is mine is mine to freely receive
Like the changing of seasons
This is the beauty of the word
And for all that I have seen and heard
Oh I want to come home
Somehow Ill make my way - my way home to you
Chorus
Bridge:
Oh father hear my call (oh father hear my call)
I know youll catch me when I fall
Oh father hear my call
I know youll catch me when I fall
Oh I pray that youll hold me now
Hold me
And take my fear away
Im cryin save me
Oh I know that you can hear me
Hear me crying out for love
Oh I know that you can feel my cry for love...ooh...
I can feel you - youre calling out
Youre crying out - a cry for love
I can feel you - youre touching me
Youre healing me - my cry for love

song performed by Michael W. SmithReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

All For Love (Feat. Bryan Adams And Sting)

When it's love you give
I'll be your man of good faith
When it's love you live
I'll make a stand I won't break
I'll be the rock you can lean on
Be there when you're old
To have and to hold
When there's love inside
I swear I'll alway's be strong
And there's a reason why
I'll prove to you we belong
I'll be the wall that protects you
from the wind and the rain
from the hurt and the pain
Let's make it all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
the one you need
Cause when it's all for one it's one for all
When there's someone that you know
then just let your feelings show
and make it all for one and all for love
When it's love you make
I'll be the fire in your night
Then it's love you take
I will defend I will fight
I'll be there when you need me
When honor's at stake
This vow I will make
That it's all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
the one you need
Cause when it's all for one it's one for all
When there's someone that you know
then just let your feelings show
and make it all for one and all for love
Don't lay our love to rest
cause we could stand up to the test
We got everything and more than we had planned
More than the rivers that run inland
We got it all in our hands
Now it's all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
the one you need
Cause when it's all for one it's one for all
When there's someone that you know
then just let your feelings show
When there's someone that you want
When there's someone that you need
Let's make it all all for one
and all for love

song performed by Rod StewartReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

All For Love

(bryan adams, robert john mutt lange, michael kamen)
When its love you give
Ill be your man of good faith
When its love you live
Ill make a stand I wont break
Ill be the rock you can lean on
Be there when youre old
To have and to hold
When theres love inside
I swear Ill always be strong
And theres a reason why
Ill prove to you we belong
Ill be the wall that protects you
From the wind and the rain
From the hurt and the pain
Lets make it all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
The one you need
Cause when its all for one its one for all
When theres someone that you know
Then just let your feelings show
And make it all for one and all for love
When its love you make
Ill be the fire in your night
Then its love you take
I will defend I will fight
Ill be there when you need me
When honors at stake
This vow I will make
That its all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
The one you need
Cause when its all for one its one for all
When theres someone that you know
Then just let your feelings show
And make it all for one and all for love
Dont lay our love to rest
Cause we could stand up to the test
We got everything and more than we had planned
More than the rivers that run inland
We got it all in our hands
Now its all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
The one you need
Cause when its all for one its one for all
When theres someone that you know
Then just let your feelings show
When theres someone that you want
When theres someone that you need
Lets make it all all for one
And all for love

song performed by Rod StewartReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

All For Love

When it's love you give
I'll be a man of good faith
Then in love you live
I'll make a stand, I won't break
I'll be the rock you can build on
Be there when you're old, to have and to hold
When there's love inside
I swear I'll always be strong
Then there's a reason why
I'll prove to you we belong
I'll be the wall that protects you
From the wind and the rain
From the hurt and pain.
Let's make it all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
The one you need
'Cause when it's all for one
It's one for all
When there's someone that should know
Then just let your feelings show
And make it all for one and all for love
When it's love you make
I'll be the fire in your night
Then it's love you take
I will defend, I will fight
I'll be there when you need me.
When honor's at stake, this vow I will make
That it's all for one and all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
The one you need
'Cause when it's all for one
It's one for all
When there's someone that should know
Then just let your feelings show
And make it all for one and all for love
Don't lay our love to rest
'Cause we could stand up to the test
We got everything and more than we had planned
More than the rivers that run the land
We've got it all in our hands
Now it's all for one and all for love
It's all for love
Let the one you hold be the one you want
The one you need
'Cause when it's all for one
It's one for all
It's one for all
When there's someone that should know
Then just let your feelings show
When there's someone that you want
When there's someone that you need
Let's make it all, all for one...
And all for love

song performed by StingReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Living For Love

I’ve lost the will to fight
On this ever faithful night
Where oh so finally
Begins my time of misery
I’ve been sad a lot you say?
That was just sadness of the day
But now depression starts to sit
A blanket of woe begins to knit
As I start to die lonely in this world
Then I think of how my life unfurled
It was a great life of of joy so great
I had no emotion I knew I was gonna break
I should have seen it coming
I really should have known
The voice inside me humming
My very mind was thrown
I was fine I was great
Then 9nth grade started a debate
Inside me whether I should free
My emotion from the chains that I held inside me
I had chained my emotions so I would not get hurt
But I was convinced to let them go and they busted right out of my shirt
I let them be as they were fine for a while
For once in my life I had but a true smile
For I had let them go and I was still happy
My happiness was oh so sappy (^_^)
Then I developed something I never felt before
And with it desire came with a great roar
I felt love and still feel it its strong inside me
I decided to let love join the others and be free
So I let it out nervous as hell
Then I saw it start to dwell
It went after one of my friends and stayed there attached
It started to grow and I knew I was outmatched
I gave in to the love without a strong fight
For I knew love was of the strongest mite
So I listened to love and was happy as ever
Then...bam! Like someone pulled a lever
I was crushed I was destroyed and broken
And because of a few words spoken
I had let myself open knowing thate I’de be hurt
Just like that I was thrown into the dirt
Cast into a new feeling I never have had
Depression..i met you...and i’m not very glad
You are my life now Love and you
And...theres only one thing I can do
To rid myself of this burning feeling
I feel as bad....when I was stealing...
No worse worse than ever before
Depression like love lets out a great roar
Its consumed my mind happiness I know not
For right now, Happiness and joy have already begun to rot
By now they’re gone I know nothing of them anymore
Everyday I wake up and think...my mind is really sore
From all these thoughts swimming around
But every time I look I have only found
The burning love that is still inside me
I cannot rid myself of it you see
It is far to great stronger than my depression
In this poem I write out my confession
I have a feeling that depression is nearly gone
To me this love is like a giant saw
It’s cutting the depression making it weak
So that my love grows until it piques
If my love ever piques then I shall know
That my mind is not aging slow
It’s already growing, every day
Depression used to be a darkened shade of gray
But with every day my love as red
Turned my blackened heart alive from dead
I feel better after writing this poem
For it speaks the truth that I have always known
I live naught for my family or even my friends...
I live for love so it may grow to no end
Love is my life I can see that now...
Here’s to hoping I keep my mouth shut to I don’t get hurt *takes a bow*

Written by Lucas Howes AKA Iruuka Blackheart

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share
John Keats

Otho The Great - Act III

SCENE I.
The Country.
Enter ALBERT.
Albert. O that the earth were empty, as when Cain
Had no perplexity to hide his head!
Or that the sword of some brave enemy
Had put a sudden stop to my hot breath,
And hurl'd me down the illimitable gulph
Of times past, unremember'd! Better so
Than thus fast-limed in a cursed snare,
The white limbs of a wanton. This the end
Of an aspiring life! My boyhood past
In feud with wolves and bears, when no eye saw
The solitary warfare, fought for love
Of honour 'mid the growling wilderness.
My sturdier youth, maturing to the sword,
Won by the syren-trumpets, and the ring
Of shields upon the pavement, when bright-mail'd
Henry the Fowler pass'd the streets of Prague,
Was't to this end I louted and became
The menial of Mars, and held a spear
Sway'd by command, as corn is by the wind?
Is it for this, I now am lifted up
By Europe's throned Emperor, to see
My honour be my executioner,
My love of fame, my prided honesty
Put to the torture for confessional?
Then the damn'd crime of blurting to the world
A woman's secret! Though a fiend she be,
Too tender of my ignominious life;
But then to wrong the generous Emperor
In such a searching point, were to give up
My soul for foot-ball at Hell's holiday!
I must confess, and cut my throat, to-day?
To-morrow? Ho! some wine!
Enter SIGIFRED.
Sigifred. A fine humour
Albert. Who goes there? Count Sigifred? Ha! Ha!
Sigifred. What, man, do you mistake the hollow sky
For a throng 'd tavern, and these stubbed trees
For old serge hangings, me, your humble friend,
For a poor waiter? Why, man, how you stare!
What gipsies have you been carousing with?
No, no more wine; methinks you've had enough.
Albert. You well may laugh and banter. What a fool
An injury may make of a staid man!
You shall know all anon.
Sigifred. Some tavern brawl?
Albert. 'Twas with some people out of common reach;
Revenge is difficult.
Sigifred. I am your friend;
We meet again to-day, and can confer
Upon it. For the present I'm in haste.
Albert. Whither?
Sigifred. To fetch King Gersa to the feast.
The Emperor on this marriage is so hot,
Pray Heaven it end not in apoplexy!
The very porters, as I pass'd the doors,
Heard his loud laugh, and answer 'd in full choir.
I marvel, Albert, you delay so long
From those bright revelries; go, show yourself,
You may be made a duke.
Albert. Aye, very like:
Pray, what day has his Highness fix'd upon?
Sigifred. For what?
Albert. The marriage. What else can I mean?
Sigifred. To-day! O, I forgot, you could not know;
The news is scarce a minute old with me.
Albert. Married to-day! To-day! You did not say so?
Sigifred. Now, while I speak to you, their comely heads
Are bow'd before the mitre.
Albert. O! Monstrous!
Sigifred. What is this?
Albert. Nothing, Sigifred. Farewell!
We'll meet upon our subject. Farewell, count!
[Exit.
Sigifred. Is this clear-headed Albert? He brain-turned!
‘Tis as portentous as a meteor. [Exit.

SCENE II. An Apartment in the Castle.
Enter, as from the Marriage, OTHO, LUDOLPH, AURANTHE, CONRAD,
Nobles, Knights, Ladies, &c. Music.
Otho. Now, Ludolph! Now, Auranthe! Daughter fair!
What can I find to grace your nuptial day
More than my love, and these wide realms in fee?
Ludolph. I have too much.
Auranthe. And I, my liege, by far.
Ludolph. Auranthe! I have! O, my bride, my love!
Not all the gaze upon us can restrain
My eyes, too long poor exiles from thy face,
From adoration, and my foolish tongue
From uttering soft responses to the love
I see in thy mute beauty beaming forth!
Fair creature, bless me with a single word!
All mine!
Auranthe. Spare, spare me, my Lord! I swoon else.
Ludolph. Soft beauty! by to-morrow I should die,
Wert thou not mine. [They talk apart,
First Lady. How deep she has bewitch'd him!
First Knight. Ask you for her recipe for love philtres.
Second Lady. They hold the Emperor in admiration,
Otho. If ever king was happy, that am I!
What are the cities 'yond the Alps to me,
The provinces about the Danube's mouth,
The promise of fair soil beyond the Rhone;
Or routing out of Hyperborean hordes,
To those fair children, stars of a new age?
Unless perchance I might rejoice to win
This little ball of earth, and chuck it them
To play with!
Auranthe. Nay, my Lord, I do not know.
Ludolph. Let me not famish.
Otho (to Conrad). Good Franconia,
You heard what oath I sware, as the sun rose,
That unless Heaven would send me back my son,
My Arab, no soft music should enrich
The cool wine, kiss'd off with a soldier's smack;
Now all my empire, barter 'd for one feast,
Seems poverty.
Conrad. Upon the neighbour-plain
The heralds have prepar'd a royal lists;
Your knights, found war-proof in the bloody field,
Speed to the game.
Otho. Well, Ludolph, what say you?
Ludolph. My lord!
Otho. A tourney?
Conrad. Or, if't please you best
Ludolph. I want no morel
First Lady. He soars!
Second Lady. Past all reason.
Ludolph. Though heaven's choir
Should in a vast circumference descend
And sing for my delight, I'd stop my ears!
Though bright Apollo's car stood burning here,
And he put out an arm to bid me mount,
His touch an immortality, not I!
This earth, this palace, this room, Auranthe!
Otho. This is a little painful; just too much.
Conrad, if he flames longer in this wise,
I shall believe in wizard-woven loves
And old romances; but I'll break the spell.
Ludolph!
Conrad. He will be calm, anon.
Ludolph. You call'd?
Yes, yes, yes, I offend. You must forgive me;
Not being quite recover'd from the stun
Of your large bounties. A tourney, is it not?
{A senet heard faintly.
Conrad. The trumpets reach us.
Ethelbert (without). On your peril, sirs,
Detain us!
First Voice (without). Let not the abbot pass.
Second Voice (without). No,
On your lives!
First Voice (without). Holy Father, you must not.
Ethelbert (without). Otho!
Otho. Who calls on Otho?
Ethelhert (without). Ethelbert!
Otho. Let him come in.
Enter ETHELBERT leading in ERMINIA.
Thou cursed abbot, why
Hast brought pollution to our holy rites?
Hast thou no fear of hangman, or the faggot?
Ludolph. What portent what strange prodigy is this?
Conrad. Away!
Ethelbert. You, Duke?
Ermmia. Albert has surely fail'd me!
Look at the Emperor's brow upon me bent!
Ethelbert. A sad delay!
Conrad. Away, thou guilty thing!
Ethelbert. You again, Duke? Justice, most mighty Otho!
You go to your sister there and plot again,
A quick plot, swift as thought to save your heads;
For lo! the toils are spread around your den,
The word is all agape to see dragg'd forth
Two ugly monsters.
Ludolph. What means he, my lord?
Conrad. I cannot guess.
Ethelbert. Best ask your lady sister,
Whether the riddle puzzles her beyond
The power of utterance.
Conrad. Foul barbarian, cease;
The Princess faints!
Ludolph. Stab him! , sweetest wife!
[Attendants bear off AURANTHE,
Erminia. Alas!
Ethelbert. Your wife?
Ludolph. Aye, Satan! does that yerk ye?
Ethelbert. Wife! so soon!
Ludolph. Aye, wife! Oh, impudence!
Thou bitter mischief! Venomous mad priest!
How dar'st thou lift those beetle brows at me?
Me the prince Ludolph, in this presence here,
Upon my marriage-day, and scandalize
My joys with such opprobrious surprise? SO
Wife! Why dost linger on that syllable,
As if it were some demon's name pronounc'd
To summon harmful lightning, and make roar
The sleepy thunder? Hast no sense of fear?
No ounce of man in thy mortality?
Tremble! for, at my nod, the sharpen'd axe
Will make thy bold tongue quiver to the roots,
Those grey lids wink, and thou not know it more!
Ethelbert. O, poor deceived Prince! I pity thee!
Great Otho! I claim justice
Ludolph. Thou shalt hav 't!
Thine arms from forth a pulpit of hot fire
Shall sprawl distracted! O that that dull cowl
Were some most sensitive portion of thy life,
That I might give it to my hounds to tear!
Thy girdle some fine zealous-pained nerve
To girth my saddle! And those devil's beads
Each one a life, that I might, every day,
Crush one with Vulcan's hammer!
Otho. Peace, my son;
You far outstrip my spleen in this affair.
Let us be calm, and hear the abbot's plea
For this intrusion.
Ludolph. I am silent, sire.
Otho. Conrad, see all depart not wanted here.
[Exeunt Knights, Ladies, &c.
Ludolph, be calm. Ethelbert, peace awhile.
This mystery demands an audience
Of a just judge, and that will Otho be.
Ludolph. Why has he time to breathe another word?
Otho. Ludolph, old Ethelbert, be sure, comes not
To beard us for no cause ; he's not the man
To cry himself up an ambassador
Without credentials.
Ludolph. I’ll chain up myself.
Otho. Old Abbot, stand here forth. Lady Erminia,
Sit. And now, Abbot! what have you to say?
Our ear is open. First we here denounce
Hard penalties against thee, if 't be found
The cause for which you have disturb 'd us here,
Making our bright hours muddy, be a thing
Of little moment.
Ethelbert. See this innocent!
Otho! thou father of the people call'd,
Is her life nothing? Her fair honour nothing?
Her tears from matins until even-song
Nothing? Her burst heart nothing? Emperor!
Is this your gentle niece the simplest flower
Of the world's herbal this fair lilly blanch 'd
Still with the dews of piety, this meek lady
Here sitting like an angel newly-shent,
Who veils its snowy wings and grows all pale,
Is she nothing?
Otho. What more to the purpose, abbot?
Ludolph. Whither is he winding?
Conrad. No clue yet!
Ethelbert. You have heard, my Liege, and so, no
doubt, all here,
Foul, poisonous, malignant whisperings;
Nay open speech, rude mockery grown common,
Against the spotless nature and clear fame
Of the princess Erminia, your niece.
I have intruded here thus suddenly,
Because I hold those base weeds, with tight hand,
Which now disfigure her fair growing stem,
Waiting but for your sign to pull them up
By the dark roots, and leave her palpable,
To all men's sight, a Lady, innocent.
The ignominy of that whisper'd tale
About a midnight gallant, seen to climb
A window to her chamber neighboured near,
I will from her turn off, and put the load
On the right shoulders; on that wretch's head,
Who, by close stratagems, did save herself,
Chiefly by shifting to this lady's room
A rope-ladder for false witness.
Ludolph. Most atrocious!
Otho. Ethelbert, proceed.
Ethelbert. With sad lips I shall:
For in the healing of one wound, I fear
To make a greater. His young highness here
To-day was married.
Ludolph. Good.
Ethelbert. Would it were good!
Yet why do I delay to spread abroad
The names of those two vipers, from whose jaws
A deadly breath went forth to taint and blast
This guileless lady?
Otho. Abbot, speak their names.
Ethelbert. A minute first. It cannot be but may
I ask, great judge, if you to-day have put
A letter by unread?
Otho. Does 'tend in this?
Conrad. Out with their names!
Ethelbert. Bold sinner, say you so?
Ludolph. Out, tedious monk!
Otho. Confess, or by the wheel
Ethelbert. My evidence cannot be far away;
And, though it never come, be on my head
The crime of passing an attaint upon
The slanderers of this virgin.
Ludolph. Speak aloud!
Ethelbert. Auranthe, and her brother there.
Conrad. Amaze!
Ludolph. Throw them from the windows!
Otho. Do what you will!
Ludolph. What shall I do with them?
Something of quick dispatch, for should she hear,
My soft Auranthe, her sweet mercy would
Prevail against my fury. Damned priest!

What swift death wilt thou die? As to the lady
I touch her not.
Ethelbert. Illustrious Otho, stay!
An ample store of misery thou hast,
Choak not the granary of thy noble mind
With more bad bitter grain, too difficult
A cud for the repentance of a man
Grey-growing. To thee only I appeal,
Not to thy noble son, whose yeasting youth
Will clear itself, and crystal turn again.
A young man's heart, by Heaven's blessing, is
A wide world, where a thousand new-born hopes
Empurple fresh the melancholy blood;
But an old man's is narrow, tenantless
Of hopes, and stuff’d with many memories,
Which, being pleasant, ease the heavy pulse
Painful, clog up and stagnate. Weigh this matter
Even as a miser balances his coin ;
And, in the name of mercy, give command
That your knight Albert be brought here before you.
He will expound this riddle ; he will show
A noon-day proof of bad Auranthe's guilt.
Otho. Let Albert straight be summon 'd.
[Exit one of the Nobles.
Ludolph. Impossible !
I cannot doubt I will not no to doubt
Is to be ashes! wither 'd up to death!
Otho. My gentle Ludolph, harbour not a fear;
You do yourself much wrong.
Ludolph. O, wretched dolt!
Now, when my foot is almost on thy neck,
Wilt thou infuriate me? Proof! thou fool!
Why wilt thou teaze impossibility
With such a thick-skull'd persevering suit?
Fanatic obstinacy! Prodigy!
Monster of folly! Ghost of a turn'd brain!
You puzzle me, you haunt me, when I dream
Of you my brain will split! Bald sorcerer!
Juggler! May I come near you? On my soul
I know not whether to pity, curse, or laugh.
Enter ALBERT, and the Nobleman.
Here, Albert, this old phantom wants a proof!
Give him his proof! A camel's load of proofs!
Otho. Albert, I speak to you as to a man
Whose words once utter 'd pass like current gold;
And therefore fit to calmly put a close
To this brief tempest. Do you stand possess 'd
Of any proof against the honourableness
Of Lady Auranthe, our new-spoused daughter?
Albert. You chill me with astonishment. How's this?
My Liege, what proof should I have 'gainst a fame
Impossible of slur? [Otho rises.
Erminia. O wickedness!
Ethelbert. Deluded monarch, 'tis a cruel lie.
Otho. Peace, rebel-priest!
Conrad. Insult beyond credence!
Erminia. Almost a dream!
Ludolph. We have awaken'd from
A foolish dream that from my brow hath wrung
A wrathful dew. O folly! why did I
So act the lion with this silly gnat?
Let them depart. Lady Erminia!
I ever griev'd for you, as who did not?
But now you have, with such a brazen front,
So most maliciously, so madly striven
To dazzle the soft moon, when tenderest clouds
Should be unloop'd around to curtain her;
I leave you to the desert of the world
Almost with pleasure. Let them be set free
For me! I take no personal revenge
More than against a nightmare, which a man
forgets in the new dawn.
[Exit LUDOLPH.
Otho. Still in extremes! No, they must not be loose.
Ethelbert. Albert, I must suspect thee of a crime
So fiendish
Otho. Fear'st thou not my fury, monk?
Conrad, be they in your sure custody
Till we determine some fit punishment.
It is so mad a deed, I must reflect
And question them in private ; for perhaps,
By patient scrutiny, we may discover
Whether they merit death, or should be placed
In care of the physicians.
[Exeunt OTHO and Nobles, ALBERT following.
Conrad. My guards, ho!
Erminia. Albert, wilt thou follow there?
Wilt thou creep dastardly behind his back,
And slink away from a weak woman's eye?
Turn, thou court-Janus! thou forget'st thyself;
Here is the Duke, waiting with open arms,
[Enter Guards.
To thank thee; here congratulate each other;
Wring hands; embrace; and swear how lucky 'twas
That I, by happy chance, hit the right man
Of all the world to trust in.
Albert. Trust! to me!
Conrad (aside). He is the sole one in this mystery.
Erminia. Well, I give up, and save my prayers for Heaven!
You, who could do this deed, would ne'er relent,
Though, at my words, the hollow prison-vaults
Would groan for pity.
Conrad. Manacle them both!
Ethelbert. I know it—it must be I see it all!
Albert, thou art the minion!
Erminia. Ah ! too plain
Conrad. Silence! Gag up their mouths! I cannot bear
More of this brawling. That the Emperor
Had plac'd you in some other custody!
Bring them away.
[Exeunt all but ALBERT.
Albert. Though my name perish from the book of honour,
Almost before the recent ink is dry,
And be no more remember'd after death,
Than any drummer's in the muster-roll;
Yet shall I season high my sudden fall
With triumph o'er that evil-witted duke!
He shall feel what it is to have the hand
Of a man drowning, on his hateful throat.
Enter GERSA and SIGIFRED.
Gersa. What discord is at ferment in this house?
Sigifred. We are without conjecture; not a soul
We met could answer any certainty.
Gersa. Young Ludolph, like a fiery arrow, shot
By us.
Sigifred. The Emperor, with cross'd arms, in thought.
Gersa. In one room music, in another sadness,
Perplexity every where!
Albert. A trifle more!
Follow; your presences will much avail
To tune our jarred spirits. I'll explain. [Exeunt.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Alma; or, The Progress of the Mind. In Three Cantos. - Canto II.

But shall we take the Muse abroad,
To drop her idly on the road,
And leave our subject in the middle,
As Butler did his Bear and Fiddle?
Yet he, consummate master, knew
When to recede and where pursue:
His noble negligence teach
What others' toils despair to reach.
He, perfect dancer, climbs the rope,
And balances your fear and hope.
If, after some distinguished leap,
He drops his pole, and seems to slip,
Straight gathering all his active strength,
He rises higher half his length:
With wonder you approve his sleight,
And owe your pleasure to your fright:
But like poor Andrew I advance,
False mimic of my master's dance;
Around the chord a while I sprawl,
And thence, though low, in earnest fall.

My preface tells you I digress'd;
He's half absolved who has confess'd.

I like, quoth Dick, your simile,
And in return take two from me.
As masters in the
clare-obscure

With various light your eyes allure,
A flaming yellow here they spread,
Draw off in blue, or change in red;
Yet from these colours oddly mix'd
Your sight upon the whole is fix'd:
Or as, again, your courtly dames
(Whose clothes returning birthday claims)
By arts improve the stuffs they vary,
And things are best as most contrary;
The gown with stiff embroidery shining,
Looks charming with a slighter lining;
Look out, if Indian figure stain,
The in-side must be rich and plain:
So you, great authors, have thought fit
To make digression temper wit:
You calm them with a milder air:
To break their points you turn their force,
And furbelow the plain discourse.

Richard, quoth Matt, these words of thine
Speak something sly and something fine;
But I shall e'en resume my theme,
However thou may'st praise or blame.

As people marry now and settle,
Fierce Love abates his usual mettle;
Worldly desires and household cares
Disturb the godhead's soft affairs:
So now, as health or temper changes,
In larger compass Alma ranges,
This day below, the next above,
As light or solid whimsies move.
So merchant has his house in Town,
And country seat near Bansted Down;
From one he dates his foreign letters,
Sends out his goods and duns his debtors:
In th' other, at his hours of leisure,
He smokes his pipe, and takes his pleasure.

And now your matrimonial Cupid,
Lash'd on by Time, grows tired and stupid:
For story and experience tell us
That man grows cold and woman jealous.
Both would their solid ends secure;
He sighs for freedom she for power:
His wishes tend abroad to roam,
And hers to domineer at home.
Thus passion flags by slow degrees,
And ruffled more delighted legs,
The busy mind does seldom go
To those once charming seats below;
For well-bred feints and future wars,
(When he last autumn lay a-dying)
Was but to gain him to appoint her
By codicil a larger jointure:
The woman finds it all a trick
That he could swoon when she was sick,
And knows that in that grief he reckon'd
One black-eyed Susan for his second.

Thus having strove some tedious years
With feign'd desires and real fears,
And tired with answers and replies
Of John affirms, and Martha lies,
Leaving this endless altercation,
The mind affects a higher station.

Poltis, that generous king of Thrace,
I think was in this very case.
All Asia now was by the ears,
And gods beat up for volunteers
To Greece and Troy, while Poltis sate
In quiet, governing his state.
And whence, said the pacific king,
Does all this noise and discord spring?
Why, Paris took Atrides' wife -
With ease I could compose this strife:
The injured hero should not lose,
Nor the young lover want, a spouse.
But Helen changed her first condition
Without her husband's just permission.
What from the dame can Paris hope?
She may as well from him elope.
Again, How can her old good man
With honour take her back again?
From hence I logically gather
The woman cannot live with either.
Now I have two right honest wives,
For whose possession no man strives:
One to Atrides I will send,
And t'other to my Trojan friend.
Each prince shall thus with honour have
What both so warmly seem to crave;
The wrath of gods and men shall cease,
And Poltis live and die in peace.

Dick, if this story pleaseth thee,
Pray thank Dan Pope, who told it me.

Howe'er swift Alma's flight may vary,
(Take this by way of corollary)
Some limbs she finds the very same
In place, and dignity, and name:
These dwell at such convenient distance,
That each may give his friend assistance.
Thus he who runs or dances, begs
The equal vigour of two legs;
So much to both does Alma trust
She ne'er regards which goes the first.
Teague could make neither of them stay,
For whilst one hand exalts the blow,
And on the earth extends the foe,
Th' other would take it wondrous ill
If in your pocket he lay still.
And when you shoot and shut one eye,
To lend the other friendly aid,
Or wink as coward, and afraid.
No, Sir; whilst he withdraws his flame,
His comrade takes the surer aim.
One moment if his beams recede,
As soon as e'er the bird is dead,
Opening again, he lays his claim
To half the profit, half the fame,
And helps to pocket up the game.
'Tis thus one tradesman slips away
To give his partner fairer play.

Some limbs again, in bulk or stature
Unlike, and not a-kin by Nature,
In concert act, like modern friends,
Because one serves the other's ends.
The arm thus waits upon the heart,
So quick to take the bully's part,
That one, though warm, decides more slow
Than th' other executes the blow:
A stander-by may chance to have it
Ere Hack himself perceives he gave it.

The amorous eyes thus always go
A strolling for their friends below;
For long before the squire and dame
Have
tete a tete
relieved their flame,
Ere visits yet are brought about,
They eye by sympathy looks out,
Knows Florimel, and longs to meet her,
And if he sees is sure to greet her,
Though at sash-window, on the stairs,
At court, nay, (authors say) at prayers -

The funeral of some valiant knight
May give this thing its proper light.
View his two gauntlets; these declare
That both his hands were used to war;
And from his two gilt spurs 'tis learn'd
His feet were equally concern'd:
But have you not with thought beheld
The sword hang dangling o'er his shield?
Which shows the breast that plate was used to
Had an ally right arm to trust to;
And by the peep holes in his crest,
Is it not virtually confess'd
That there his eye took distant aim,
And glances respect to that bright dame,
In whose delight his hope was center'd,
And for whose glove his life he ventured?

Objections to my general system
May rise, perhaps, and I have miss'd them;
But I can call to my assistance
Proximity (mark that!) and distance;
Can prove that all things, on occasion,
Love union, and desire adhesion!
That Alma merely is a scale,
And motives, like the weights prevail.
If neither side turn down or up,
With loss or gain, with fear or hope,
The balance always would hang even,
Like Mahomet's tomb, 'twixt earth and heaven.

This, Richard, is a curious case:
Suppose your eyes sent equal rays
Upon two distant pots of ale,
Not knowing which was mild or stale;
In this sad state your doubtful choice
Would never have the casting voice;
Which best nor worst you could not think,
And die you must for want of drink,
Unless some chance inclines your sight,
Setting one pot in fairer light;
Then you prefer or A or B,
As lines and angles best agree;
Your sense resolved impels your will;
She guides your hand - So drink your fill.

Have you not seen a baker's maid
Between two equal panniers sway'd?
Her tallies useless lie and idle
If placed exactly in the middle;
But forced from this unactive state
By virtue of some casual weight,
On either side you hear them clatter,
And judge of right and left hand matter.

Now, Richard, this coercive force
Without your choice must take its course.
Great kings to wars are pointed forth
Like loaded needles to the North,
And thou and I, by power unseen,
Are barely passive and suck'd in
To Henault's vaults or Celia's chamber,
As straw and paper are by amber.
If we sit down to play or set,
(Suppose at Ombre or Basset)
Let people call us cheats or fools,
Our cards and we are equal tools,
We sure in vain the cards condemn;
Ourselves both cut and shuffled them:
In vain on Fortune's aid rely;
She only is a stander-by.
Poor men! poor papers! we and they
Do some impulsive force obey,
Are but play'd with - do not play.
But space and matter we should blame;
They palm'd the trick that lost the game.

Thus to save further contradiction
Against what you may think but fiction,
I for attraction, Dick, declare,
Deny it those bold men that dare.
As well your mention as your thought
Is all by hidden impulse wrought:
Even saying that you think or walk,
How like a country squire you talk?

Mark then; - Where fancy or desire
Collects the beams of vital fire,
Into that limb fair Alma slides
And there
pro tempore
resides:
She dwells in Nicholini's tongue,
When Pyrrhus chants the heavenly song;
When Pedro does the lute command,
She guides the cunning artist's hand;
Through Macer's gullet she runs down,
When the vile glutton dines alone;
And, void of modesty and thought,
She follows Bibo's endless draught,
Through the soft sex again she ranges,
As youth, caprice, or fashion, changes:
Fair Alma, careless and serene,
In Fanny's sprightly eyes is seen.
While they diffuse their infant beams,
Themselves not conscious of their flames.
Again, fair Alma sits confess'd
On Florimel's experter breast,
When she the rising sigh constrains,
And by concealing speaks her pains.
In Cynthia's neck fair Alma glows,
When the vain thing her jewels shows;
When Jenny's stays are newly laced
Fair Alma plays about her waist;
And when the swelling hoop sustains
The rich brocade, fair Alma deigns
Into that lower space to enter,
Of the large round herself the center.

Again; that single limb or feature
(Such is the cogent force of Nature)
Which most did Alma's passion move,
In the first object of her love,
For ever will be found confess'd,
And printed on the amorous breast.

O Abelard! ill-fated youth,
Thy tale will justify this truth;
But well I weet thy cruel wrong
Adorns a nobler poet's song,
Dan Pope, for thy misfortune grieve!,
With kind concern and skill has weaved
A silken web, and ne'er shall fade
Its colours gently: as he laid
The mantle o'er thy sad distress,
And Venus shall the texture bless.
He o'er the weeping nun has drawn
Such artful folds of sacred lawn,
That Love, with equal grief and pride,
Shall see the crime he strives to hide,
And softly drawing back the veil,
The god shall to his votaries tell
Each conscious tear, each blushing grace,
That deck'd dear Eloisa's face.

Happy the poet, bless'd the lays,
Which Buckingham has deign'd to praise.

Next, Dick, as youth and habit sways,
A hundred gambols Alma plays.
If, whilst a boy, Jack run from school,
Fond of his hunting-horn and pole,
Though gout and age his speed detain,
Old John halloos his hounds again:
By his fireside he starts the hare,
And turns her in his wicker chair.
His feet, however lame, you find,
Have got the better of his mind.

If, while the Mind was in her leg,
The dance affected nimble Peg,
Old Madge bewitch'd, at sixty-one
Calls for Green Sleeves and Jumping Joan.
In public mask or private ball,
From Lincoln's-inn to Goldsmith's-Hall,
All Christmas long away she trudges,
Trips it was 'prentices and judges;
In vain her children urge her stay,
And age or palsy bar the way:
But if those images prevail,
Which whilom did affect the tail,
She still reviews the ancient scene,
Forgets the forty years between;
Awkwardly gay, and oddly merry,
Her scarf pale pink, her headknot cherry,
O'erheated with ideal rage,
She cheats her son to wed her page.

If Alma, whilst the man was young,
Slipp'd up too soon into his tongue,
Pleased with his own fantastic skill,
He lets that weapon ne'er lie still;
On any point if you dispute,
Depend upon it he'll confute:
Change sides, and you increase your pain,
For he'll confute you back again:
For one may speak with Tully's tongue,
Yet all the while be in the wrong;
And 'tis remarkable that they
talk most who have the least to say.
Your dainty speakers have the curse
To plead bad causes down to worse;
As dames who native beauty want,
Still uglier look the more they paint.

Again: if in the female sex
Alma should on this member fix,
(A cruel and a desperate case,
From which Heaven shield my lovely lass!)
For ever more all care is vain
That would bring Alma down again.
As in habitual gout or stone,
The only thing that can be done
Is to correct your drink and diet,
And keep the inward foe in quiet;
So if, for any sins of ours,
Or our forefathers, higher powers,
Severe, though just, afflict our life,
With that prime ill, a talking wife,
Till death shall bring the kind relief,
We must be patient or be deaf.

You know a certain lady, Dick,
Who saw me when I last was sick;
She kindly talk'd, at least three hours,
Of plastic forms and mental powers;
Described our pre-existing station,
Before this vile terrene creation;
And, lest I should be wearied, Madam,
To cut things short, came down to Adam;
From whence, as fast as she was able,
She drowns the world, and builds up Babel:
Through Syria, Persia, Greece, she goes,
And takes the Romans in the close.

But we'll descant on general Nature;
This is a system, not a satire.

Turn we this globe, and let us see
How different nations disagree,
In what we wear, or eat, and drink;
Nay, Dick, perhaps in what we think.
In water as you smell and taste
The soils through which it rose and past,
In Alma's manners you may read
The place where she was born and bred.

One people from their swaddling-bands
Released their infants' feet and hands:
Here Alma to these limbs was brought
And Sparta's offspring kick'd and fought.

Another taught their babes to talk
Ere they could yet in go-carts walk:
There Alma settled in the tongue,
And orators from Athens sprung.

Observe but in these neighbouring lands
The different use of mouth and hands:
As men reposed their various hopes,
In battles these, and those in tropes.

In Britain's isles, as Heylin notes,
The ladies trip in petticoats,
Which, for the honour of their nation,
They quit but on some great occasion,
Men there in breeches clad you view;
They claim that garment as their due.
In Turkey the reverse appears;
Long coats the haughty husband wears,
And greets his wife with angry speeches,
If she be seen without her breeches.

In our fantastic climes the fair
With cleanly powder dry their hair,
And round their lovely breast and head
Fresh flowers their mingled odours shed:
Your nicer Hottentots think meet
With guts and tripe to deck their feet;
With downcast looks on Totta's legs
The ogling youth most humbly begs
She would not from his hopes remove
At once his breakfast and his love;
And if the skittish nymph should fly,
He in a double sense must die.

We simple toasters take delight
To see our women's teeth look white,
And every saucy ill-bred fellow
Sneers at a mouth profoundly yellow
In China none hold women sweet,
Except their snags are black as jet:
King Chihu put nine queens to death,
Convict on statute, ivory teeth.

At Tonquin, if a prince should die,
(As Jesuits write, who never lie)
The wife, and counsellor, and priest,
Who served him most, and loved him best,
Prepare and light his funeral fire,
And cheerful on the pile expire.
In Europe 'twould be hard to find
In each degree on half so kind.

Now turn we to the farthest East,
And there observe the gentry drest.
Prince Giolo and his royal sisters,
Scarr'd with ten thousand comely blisters,
The marks remaining on the skin,
To tell the quality within:
Distinguish'd flashes deck the great,
As each excels in birth or state;
His oylet-holes are more and ampler:
The king's own body was a sampler.
Happy the climate where the beau
Wears the same suit for use and show;
And at a small expense your wife,
If once well pink'd, is cloath'd for life.

Westward again, the Indian fair
Is nicely smear'd with fat of bear:
Before you see you smell your toast,
And sweetest she who stinks the most.
The finest sparks and cleanest beaux
Drip from the shoulders to the toes.
How sleek their skins, their joints how easy!
There slovens only are not greasy.

I mention'd different ways of breeding;
Begin we in our children's reading,
To master John the English maid
A hornbrook gives of gingerbread,
And that the child may learn the better,
As he can name he eats the letter;
Proceeding thus with vast delight,
He spells and gnaws from left to right.
But show a Hebrew's hopeful son
Where we suppose the book begun,
The child would thank you for your kindness,
And read quite backward from our
finis
;
Devour he learning ne'er so fast,
Great A would be reserved the last.
An equal instance of this matter
Is in the manners of a daughter.
In Europe if a harmless maid,
By Nature and by Love betray'd,
Should ere a wife become a nurse,
Her friends would look on her the worse.
In China, Dampier's Travels tell ye,
(Look in his index for Pagelli)
Soon as the British ships unmoor,
And jolly long-boats row to shore,
Down come the nobles of the land,
Each brings his daughter in his hand,
Beseeching the mysterious tar
To make her but one hour his care:
The tender mother stands affrighted,
Les her dear daughter should be slighted,
And poor Miss Yaya dreads the shame
Of going back the maid she came.

Observe how custom, Dick, compels
The lady that in Europe dwells:
After her tea she slips away,
And what to do one need not say.
Now see how great Pomonque's queen
Behaved herself amongst the men;
Pleased with her punch, the gallant soul
First drank, then water'd in the bowl,
And sprinkled in the captain's face
The marks of her peculiar grace. -

To close this point we need not roam
For instances so far from home.
What parts gay France from sober Spain?
A little rising rocky chain.
Of men born south or north o' the hill,
Those seldom move, these ne'er stand still.
Dick, you love maps, and may perceive
Rome not far distant from Geneve.
If the good Pope remains at home,
He's the first prince in Christendom.
Choose then, good Pope, at home to stay,
Nor westward, curious, take thy way:
Thy way, unhappy, shouldst thou take
From Tiber's bank to Leman lake,
Thou art an aged priest no more,
But a young flaring painted bunny:
Thy sex is lost, thy town is gone;
No longer Rome, but Babylon.
That some few leagues should make this change,
To men unlearn'd seems mighty strange.

But need we, friend, insist on this?
Since, in the very Cantons Swiss,
All your philosophers agree,
And prove it plain, that one may be
A heretic or true believer,
On this or t'other side the rive.

Here, with an artful smile, quoth Dick -
Your proofs come mighty full and thick -

The bard, on this extensive chapter,
Wound up into poetic rapture,
Continued: Richard, cast your eye
By night upon a winter sky;
Cast it by day-light on the strand,
Which compasses fair Albion's land;
If you can count the stars that glow
Above, or sands that lie below,
Into these common places look,
Which from great authors I have took,
And count the proofs I have collected,
To have my writings well protected:
These I lay by for time of need,
And thou may'st at thy leisure read:
For standing every critic's rage,
I safely will, to future age
My system as a gift bequeath,
Victorious over spite and death.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share
 

Search


Recent searches | Top searches