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Patrick White

A Creed For The Desperate

Don't let your bones be softened by fear.
By the time you hear it the lightning has already struck.
Don't listen for the echoes of things you haven't said.
And stop breaking your fortune-cookie skull open
like an old prophetic head
that claims it's been to the dark side
without being dead.
Don't let disaster define you.
You're not the bouquet
of a second class vinegar
hovering over a first class wine.
No crisis ever comes with its own identity
until you give it yours.
Move calmly over your own waters
like clouds in the eye of a puddle.
Walk as if you were already
following your own funeral
and lost your way to the grave.
People make much of being
but seeing is enough
to save you sometimes
from your own obscurity.
And when was there ever any security
in security
as if this flame were safer than that?
How long has the universe risked being you?
Take a chance on your own magic
and pull your life like a tiger
out of your own hat
to eat the rabbit you've become.
Then there's nothing to run from.
Become the sword
and you won't cut yourself.
Become the fire
and you won't burn.
Become life again
and you won't pass away
breath after breath after breath
wishing you could stay
in the negative space
of a comfortable death
that eulogizes your lies.
There are full moons
that don't weigh
like pennies on your eyes
to keep you from seeing too much.
And there are things of the earth
that have followed you into exile
like a new birth of things you can touch
that are wholly yours in passing
like music from a keyboard
or a fire in church.
And you may be down
to your last black beatitude
and righteously uphold the sanctity
of your will not to listen
to anything but the clinking of your own chains
and the mournful whistle
of your distant dying derailed thought-trains
giving up the ghost
but you're just sucking on the tit
of a perverse purity
and you're milking it
like the bitter truth
for all it's worth.
And it's not worth much.
And you may have flattened
all the mountains
and filled all the valleys
of your flatlining event horizons
but there's still life going on
in the crooked back alleys
of secret dimensions
you don't know about
stuck in the house all day
like a child afraid to go out.
You look at a tree.
You see a crutch.
You look at the moon.
You see a scar.
You look at a star
and you're lost for good wherever you are.
And it's not really a dysfunction of your imagination
that you can look at the Taj Mahal
and see a one-room hovel with slumlords
jacking up the rent.
It's good to look both ways
at any spiritual crossing.
But you see a stick in the water
and you think the water's bent.
And to shrink anything as the Tao says
you must first expand it.
But I think the Tao meant the universe
not a used condom on the death's-head
of a stillborn resurrection.
But you'd have to fall
further than you have
to understand it.
You'd have to fall
from your present plight on the world mountain
all the way down until you came to a space
where there were no more opposites in the abyss
and nothing in order
nothing amiss
nothing is meant
to scare you into being
and nothing is trying to hold you back.
What's your lover's mouth
if not a wound
you can kiss into healing?
You can see it that way.
Or you can harden the bruised fruit
with brittle tears
and flint knap chandeliers
to fall from star-crossed mirrors
like rain from broken glass
that hasn't fired up a single root in years
to dream of flowers.
The mind's an artist.
The painting's yours.
A self portrait in the image of God
whom no one's ever seen.
I see a black star in the bottom of a tulip
shining up at me
like the direction it took
to get to the other side.
You see a poisonous spider
like the leftover lees
of a flowerless wine
in the eye of a toxic goblet.
And you might raise it to your lips
like a lunar eclipse
but you never drink up.
And even when you do
it's a bad guest in the house of life
that drinks from his own skull
like the grail of a grape on the vine
with one eye open
as if he trusted the wine
but not the cup.
You're not the cure
that failed the ailing kingdom.
And you're not the miracle
that got up and walked away
to spread the word like a bird at sea
that had just discovered a tree to perch in
you might have sinned as a crow
but now that you've been saved
you're a carrier pigeon.
You can sit here all day if you want
like a buddha on his tatami mat
thinking bituminously
about burning enlightened diamonds
back into eyeless coal.
You can squat like a tree in rings of fat
smashing small thoughts
like eggs on the rocks
trying to read your fate
in their misfortune
like a chromosome
you hold in common
with all those who hate
having been born.
You can heap your afterbirth with scorn.
You can turn your eyes
into a pair of gravitational lenses
like dark matter
and wince at the stars
like cinders of light
that contradict your seeing.
And you wouldn't be wrong
because you can see it that way too.
The same eye by which I see God
is the eye by which She sees me.
Two creative geniuses in one studio
painting each other in the nude.
And she shows you hers
and you show her yours
as she enflames your solitude
by not putting her name on it
though it's a perfect likeness of you.
Your face warped into
a convoluted starless space
like the opening gala
of a staged extinction.
And your soul shrouded in lampblack
like a candle
that soils its own light
by putting on a deathmask of night
like a snakeoil salesman
selling skin to ghosts.
And there where your eyes used to be
two black holes
surrounded by random haloes of light
like lipstick on the mouths of star-nosed moles.
And look at that scar of red she's used
to catch your ambiguous smile.
That's the kind of genius
that leaves the asylum gate open for awhile
for everyone to get into your style
of imploding your eyes
like black dwarfs
with abstract depressionist astigmatism
as if gravity couldn't dig a grave deep enough
or matter make a stone heavy enough
to put on your chest to keep you from rising again
or the gold of the moon in your mouth
ever prove true enough to pay the ferryman
to get you to the other side of nowhere
as if he knew somehow
you huffed life like a paint thinner
trying to escape the race a winner
by never crossing a starting line
that wasn't already
a dark horse lamed by life behind you.
And he couldn't be bothered with anyone
who would fix their own death
and lay a bet against everyone
their pain could outrun their compassion
and in the second heat
their bitterness the truth.
But if you want a way out
like an emergency door
I'll let you in on a little secret.
Life doesn't grow into death
and death isn't waiting
to take your next breath.
And there's an eye of liberation
in the darkest hurricane roses of despair
that frees the light like life enough to care
that all it falls upon alike
should see its own face everywhere
through a crack of black lightning
in the white mirror
where everything that appears
evaporates like a ghost off a lake
or cataracts from the eyes
of the orthodox
who couldn't see straight enough
to thread their keys through their locks
like mystic heretics
to have known
the deepest wounds give birth
to the sweetest spears
that life has ever thrown
like light on a roadless night
or insight like a bird through the sky
that enters the sunset
like a planet following the sun
through the seven coloured doors
of the seven blind seers
who disappear in a vision of one clarity
with many more eyes
than there are lightning bolts and fireflies
whose age can be measured in light-years.
If a fraction of nothing is nothing.
Then a fraction of eternity
isn't a brevity less than the eternal
and every fraction of anything is all.
There now that's not too hard to follow.
The white face of the moon
veils the dark other you never see
because it's all been timed to turn away.
The moon and its month are one day.
Things might be empty
but they're not hollow.
And you're free to go or stay.

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The Marriage Of Geraint

The brave Geraint, a knight of Arthur's court,
A tributary prince of Devon, one
Of that great Order of the Table Round,
Had married Enid, Yniol's only child,
And loved her, as he loved the light of Heaven.
And as the light of Heaven varies, now
At sunrise, now at sunset, now by night
With moon and trembling stars, so loved Geraint
To make her beauty vary day by day,
In crimsons and in purples and in gems.
And Enid, but to please her husband's eye,
Who first had found and loved her in a state
Of broken fortunes, daily fronted him
In some fresh splendour; and the Queen herself,
Grateful to Prince Geraint for service done,
Loved her, and often with her own white hands
Arrayed and decked her, as the loveliest,
Next after her own self, in all the court.
And Enid loved the Queen, and with true heart
Adored her, as the stateliest and the best
And loveliest of all women upon earth.
And seeing them so tender and so close,
Long in their common love rejoiced Geraint.
But when a rumour rose about the Queen,
Touching her guilty love for Lancelot,
Though yet there lived no proof, nor yet was heard
The world's loud whisper breaking into storm,
Not less Geraint believed it; and there fell
A horror on him, lest his gentle wife,
Through that great tenderness for Guinevere,
Had suffered, or should suffer any taint
In nature: wherefore going to the King,
He made this pretext, that his princedom lay
Close on the borders of a territory,
Wherein were bandit earls, and caitiff knights,
Assassins, and all flyers from the hand
Of Justice, and whatever loathes a law:
And therefore, till the King himself should please
To cleanse this common sewer of all his realm,
He craved a fair permission to depart,
And there defend his marches; and the King
Mused for a little on his plea, but, last,
Allowing it, the Prince and Enid rode,
And fifty knights rode with them, to the shores
Of Severn, and they past to their own land;
Where, thinking, that if ever yet was wife
True to her lord, mine shall be so to me,
He compassed her with sweet observances
And worship, never leaving her, and grew
Forgetful of his promise to the King,
Forgetful of the falcon and the hunt,
Forgetful of the tilt and tournament,
Forgetful of his glory and his name,
Forgetful of his princedom and its cares.
And this forgetfulness was hateful to her.
And by and by the people, when they met
In twos and threes, or fuller companies,
Began to scoff and jeer and babble of him
As of a prince whose manhood was all gone,
And molten down in mere uxoriousness.
And this she gathered from the people's eyes:
This too the women who attired her head,
To please her, dwelling on his boundless love,
Told Enid, and they saddened her the more:
And day by day she thought to tell Geraint,
But could not out of bashful delicacy;
While he that watched her sadden, was the more
Suspicious that her nature had a taint.

At last, it chanced that on a summer morn
(They sleeping each by either) the new sun
Beat through the blindless casement of the room,
And heated the strong warrior in his dreams;
Who, moving, cast the coverlet aside,
And bared the knotted column of his throat,
The massive square of his heroic breast,
And arms on which the standing muscle sloped,
As slopes a wild brook o'er a little stone,
Running too vehemently to break upon it.
And Enid woke and sat beside the couch,
Admiring him, and thought within herself,
Was ever man so grandly made as he?
Then, like a shadow, past the people's talk
And accusation of uxoriousness
Across her mind, and bowing over him,
Low to her own heart piteously she said:

'O noble breast and all-puissant arms,
Am I the cause, I the poor cause that men
Reproach you, saying all your force is gone?
I AM the cause, because I dare not speak
And tell him what I think and what they say.
And yet I hate that he should linger here;
I cannot love my lord and not his name.
Far liefer had I gird his harness on him,
And ride with him to battle and stand by,
And watch his mightful hand striking great blows
At caitiffs and at wrongers of the world.
Far better were I laid in the dark earth,
Not hearing any more his noble voice,
Not to be folded more in these dear arms,
And darkened from the high light in his eyes,
Than that my lord through me should suffer shame.
Am I so bold, and could I so stand by,
And see my dear lord wounded in the strife,
And maybe pierced to death before mine eyes,
And yet not dare to tell him what I think,
And how men slur him, saying all his force
Is melted into mere effeminacy?
O me, I fear that I am no true wife.'

Half inwardly, half audibly she spoke,
And the strong passion in her made her weep
True tears upon his broad and naked breast,
And these awoke him, and by great mischance
He heard but fragments of her later words,
And that she feared she was not a true wife.
And then he thought, 'In spite of all my care,
For all my pains, poor man, for all my pains,
She is not faithful to me, and I see her
Weeping for some gay knight in Arthur's hall.'
Then though he loved and reverenced her too much
To dream she could be guilty of foul act,
Right through his manful breast darted the pang
That makes a man, in the sweet face of her
Whom he loves most, lonely and miserable.
At this he hurled his huge limbs out of bed,
And shook his drowsy squire awake and cried,
'My charger and her palfrey;' then to her,
'I will ride forth into the wilderness;
For though it seems my spurs are yet to win,
I have not fallen so low as some would wish.
And thou, put on thy worst and meanest dress
And ride with me.' And Enid asked, amazed,
'If Enid errs, let Enid learn her fault.'
But he, 'I charge thee, ask not, but obey.'
Then she bethought her of a faded silk,
A faded mantle and a faded veil,
And moving toward a cedarn cabinet,
Wherein she kept them folded reverently
With sprigs of summer laid between the folds,
She took them, and arrayed herself therein,
Remembering when first he came on her
Drest in that dress, and how he loved her in it,
And all her foolish fears about the dress,
And all his journey to her, as himself
Had told her, and their coming to the court.

For Arthur on the Whitsuntide before
Held court at old Caerleon upon Usk.
There on a day, he sitting high in hall,
Before him came a forester of Dean,
Wet from the woods, with notice of a hart
Taller than all his fellows, milky-white,
First seen that day: these things he told the King.
Then the good King gave order to let blow
His horns for hunting on the morrow morn.
And when the King petitioned for his leave
To see the hunt, allowed it easily.
So with the morning all the court were gone.
But Guinevere lay late into the morn,
Lost in sweet dreams, and dreaming of her love
For Lancelot, and forgetful of the hunt;
But rose at last, a single maiden with her,
Took horse, and forded Usk, and gained the wood;
There, on a little knoll beside it, stayed
Waiting to hear the hounds; but heard instead
A sudden sound of hoofs, for Prince Geraint,
Late also, wearing neither hunting-dress
Nor weapon, save a golden-hilted brand,
Came quickly flashing through the shallow ford
Behind them, and so galloped up the knoll.
A purple scarf, at either end whereof
There swung an apple of the purest gold,
Swayed round about him, as he galloped up
To join them, glancing like a dragon-fly
In summer suit and silks of holiday.
Low bowed the tributary Prince, and she,
Sweet and statelily, and with all grace
Of womanhood and queenhood, answered him:
'Late, late, Sir Prince,' she said, 'later than we!'
'Yea, noble Queen,' he answered, 'and so late
That I but come like you to see the hunt,
Not join it.' 'Therefore wait with me,' she said;
'For on this little knoll, if anywhere,
There is good chance that we shall hear the hounds:
Here often they break covert at our feet.'

And while they listened for the distant hunt,
And chiefly for the baying of Cavall,
King Arthur's hound of deepest mouth, there rode
Full slowly by a knight, lady, and dwarf;
Whereof the dwarf lagged latest, and the knight
Had vizor up, and showed a youthful face,
Imperious, and of haughtiest lineaments.
And Guinevere, not mindful of his face
In the King's hall, desired his name, and sent
Her maiden to demand it of the dwarf;
Who being vicious, old and irritable,
And doubling all his master's vice of pride,
Made answer sharply that she should not know.
'Then will I ask it of himself,' she said.
'Nay, by my faith, thou shalt not,' cried the dwarf;
'Thou art not worthy even to speak of him;'
And when she put her horse toward the knight,
Struck at her with his whip, and she returned
Indignant to the Queen; whereat Geraint
Exclaiming, 'Surely I will learn the name,'
Made sharply to the dwarf, and asked it of him,
Who answered as before; and when the Prince
Had put his horse in motion toward the knight,
Struck at him with his whip, and cut his cheek.
The Prince's blood spirted upon the scarf,
Dyeing it; and his quick, instinctive hand
Caught at the hilt, as to abolish him:
But he, from his exceeding manfulness
And pure nobility of temperament,
Wroth to be wroth at such a worm, refrained
From even a word, and so returning said:

'I will avenge this insult, noble Queen,
Done in your maiden's person to yourself:
And I will track this vermin to their earths:
For though I ride unarmed, I do not doubt
To find, at some place I shall come at, arms
On loan, or else for pledge; and, being found,
Then will I fight him, and will break his pride,
And on the third day will again be here,
So that I be not fallen in fight. Farewell.'

'Farewell, fair Prince,' answered the stately Queen.
'Be prosperous in this journey, as in all;
And may you light on all things that you love,
And live to wed with her whom first you love:
But ere you wed with any, bring your bride,
And I, were she the daughter of a king,
Yea, though she were a beggar from the hedge,
Will clothe her for her bridals like the sun.'

And Prince Geraint, now thinking that he heard
The noble hart at bay, now the far horn,
A little vext at losing of the hunt,
A little at the vile occasion, rode,
By ups and downs, through many a grassy glade
And valley, with fixt eye following the three.
At last they issued from the world of wood,
And climbed upon a fair and even ridge,
And showed themselves against the sky, and sank.
And thither there came Geraint, and underneath
Beheld the long street of a little town
In a long valley, on one side whereof,
White from the mason's hand, a fortress rose;
And on one side a castle in decay,
Beyond a bridge that spanned a dry ravine:
And out of town and valley came a noise
As of a broad brook o'er a shingly bed
Brawling, or like a clamour of the rooks
At distance, ere they settle for the night.

And onward to the fortress rode the three,
And entered, and were lost behind the walls.
'So,' thought Geraint, 'I have tracked him to his earth.'
And down the long street riding wearily,
Found every hostel full, and everywhere
Was hammer laid to hoof, and the hot hiss
And bustling whistle of the youth who scoured
His master's armour; and of such a one
He asked, 'What means the tumult in the town?'
Who told him, scouring still, 'The sparrow-hawk!'
Then riding close behind an ancient churl,
Who, smitten by the dusty sloping beam,
Went sweating underneath a sack of corn,
Asked yet once more what meant the hubbub here?
Who answered gruffly, 'Ugh! the sparrow-hawk.'
Then riding further past an armourer's,
Who, with back turned, and bowed above his work,
Sat riveting a helmet on his knee,
He put the self-same query, but the man
Not turning round, nor looking at him, said:
'Friend, he that labours for the sparrow-hawk
Has little time for idle questioners.'
Whereat Geraint flashed into sudden spleen:
'A thousand pips eat up your sparrow-hawk!
Tits, wrens, and all winged nothings peck him dead!
Ye think the rustic cackle of your bourg
The murmur of the world! What is it to me?
O wretched set of sparrows, one and all,
Who pipe of nothing but of sparrow-hawks!
Speak, if ye be not like the rest, hawk-mad,
Where can I get me harbourage for the night?
And arms, arms, arms to fight my enemy? Speak!'
Whereat the armourer turning all amazed
And seeing one so gay in purple silks,
Came forward with the helmet yet in hand
And answered, 'Pardon me, O stranger knight;
We hold a tourney here tomorrow morn,
And there is scantly time for half the work.
Arms? truth! I know not: all are wanted here.
Harbourage? truth, good truth, I know not, save,
It may be, at Earl Yniol's, o'er the bridge
Yonder.' He spoke and fell to work again.

Then rode Geraint, a little spleenful yet,
Across the bridge that spanned the dry ravine.
There musing sat the hoary-headed Earl,
(His dress a suit of frayed magnificence,
Once fit for feasts of ceremony) and said:
'Whither, fair son?' to whom Geraint replied,
'O friend, I seek a harbourage for the night.'
Then Yniol, 'Enter therefore and partake
The slender entertainment of a house
Once rich, now poor, but ever open-doored.'
'Thanks, venerable friend,' replied Geraint;
'So that ye do not serve me sparrow-hawks
For supper, I will enter, I will eat
With all the passion of a twelve hours' fast.'
Then sighed and smiled the hoary-headed Earl,
And answered, 'Graver cause than yours is mine
To curse this hedgerow thief, the sparrow-hawk:
But in, go in; for save yourself desire it,
We will not touch upon him even in jest.'

Then rode Geraint into the castle court,
His charger trampling many a prickly star
Of sprouted thistle on the broken stones.
He looked and saw that all was ruinous.
Here stood a shattered archway plumed with fern;
And here had fallen a great part of a tower,
Whole, like a crag that tumbles from the cliff,
And like a crag was gay with wilding flowers:
And high above a piece of turret stair,
Worn by the feet that now were silent, wound
Bare to the sun, and monstrous ivy-stems
Claspt the gray walls with hairy-fibred arms,
And sucked the joining of the stones, and looked
A knot, beneath, of snakes, aloft, a grove.

And while he waited in the castle court,
The voice of Enid, Yniol's daughter, rang
Clear through the open casement of the hall,
Singing; and as the sweet voice of a bird,
Heard by the lander in a lonely isle,
Moves him to think what kind of bird it is
That sings so delicately clear, and make
Conjecture of the plumage and the form;
So the sweet voice of Enid moved Geraint;
And made him like a man abroad at morn
When first the liquid note beloved of men
Comes flying over many a windy wave
To Britain, and in April suddenly
Breaks from a coppice gemmed with green and red,
And he suspends his converse with a friend,
Or it may be the labour of his hands,
To think or say, 'There is the nightingale;'
So fared it with Geraint, who thought and said,
'Here, by God's grace, is the one voice for me.'

It chanced the song that Enid sang was one
Of Fortune and her wheel, and Enid sang:

'Turn, Fortune, turn thy wheel and lower the proud;
Turn thy wild wheel through sunshine, storm, and cloud;
Thy wheel and thee we neither love nor hate.

'Turn, Fortune, turn thy wheel with smile or frown;
With that wild wheel we go not up or down;
Our hoard is little, but our hearts are great.

'Smile and we smile, the lords of many lands;
Frown and we smile, the lords of our own hands;
For man is man and master of his fate.

'Turn, turn thy wheel above the staring crowd;
Thy wheel and thou are shadows in the cloud;
Thy wheel and thee we neither love nor hate.'

'Hark, by the bird's song ye may learn the nest,'
Said Yniol; 'enter quickly.' Entering then,
Right o'er a mount of newly-fallen stones,
The dusky-raftered many-cobwebbed hall,
He found an ancient dame in dim brocade;
And near her, like a blossom vermeil-white,
That lightly breaks a faded flower-sheath,
Moved the fair Enid, all in faded silk,
Her daughter. In a moment thought Geraint,
'Here by God's rood is the one maid for me.'
But none spake word except the hoary Earl:
'Enid, the good knight's horse stands in the court;
Take him to stall, and give him corn, and then
Go to the town and buy us flesh and wine;
And we will make us merry as we may.
Our hoard is little, but our hearts are great.'

He spake: the Prince, as Enid past him, fain
To follow, strode a stride, but Yniol caught
His purple scarf, and held, and said, 'Forbear!
Rest! the good house, though ruined, O my son,
Endures not that her guest should serve himself.'
And reverencing the custom of the house
Geraint, from utter courtesy, forbore.

So Enid took his charger to the stall;
And after went her way across the bridge,
And reached the town, and while the Prince and Earl
Yet spoke together, came again with one,
A youth, that following with a costrel bore
The means of goodly welcome, flesh and wine.
And Enid brought sweet cakes to make them cheer,
And in her veil enfolded, manchet bread.
And then, because their hall must also serve
For kitchen, boiled the flesh, and spread the board,
And stood behind, and waited on the three.
And seeing her so sweet and serviceable,
Geraint had longing in him evermore
To stoop and kiss the tender little thumb,
That crost the trencher as she laid it down:
But after all had eaten, then Geraint,
For now the wine made summer in his veins,
Let his eye rove in following, or rest
On Enid at her lowly handmaid-work,
Now here, now there, about the dusky hall;
Then suddenly addrest the hoary Earl:

'Fair Host and Earl, I pray your courtesy;
This sparrow-hawk, what is he? tell me of him.
His name? but no, good faith, I will not have it:
For if he be the knight whom late I saw
Ride into that new fortress by your town,
White from the mason's hand, then have I sworn
From his own lips to have it--I am Geraint
Of Devon--for this morning when the Queen
Sent her own maiden to demand the name,
His dwarf, a vicious under-shapen thing,
Struck at her with his whip, and she returned
Indignant to the Queen; and then I swore
That I would track this caitiff to his hold,
And fight and break his pride, and have it of him.
And all unarmed I rode, and thought to find
Arms in your town, where all the men are mad;
They take the rustic murmur of their bourg
For the great wave that echoes round the world;
They would not hear me speak: but if ye know
Where I can light on arms, or if yourself
Should have them, tell me, seeing I have sworn
That I will break his pride and learn his name,
Avenging this great insult done the Queen.'

Then cried Earl Yniol, 'Art thou he indeed,
Geraint, a name far-sounded among men
For noble deeds? and truly I, when first
I saw you moving by me on the bridge,
Felt ye were somewhat, yea, and by your state
And presence might have guessed you one of those
That eat in Arthur's hall in Camelot.
Nor speak I now from foolish flattery;
For this dear child hath often heard me praise
Your feats of arms, and often when I paused
Hath asked again, and ever loved to hear;
So grateful is the noise of noble deeds
To noble hearts who see but acts of wrong:
O never yet had woman such a pair
Of suitors as this maiden: first Limours,
A creature wholly given to brawls and wine,
Drunk even when he wooed; and be he dead
I know not, but he past to the wild land.
The second was your foe, the sparrow-hawk,
My curse, my nephew--I will not let his name
Slip from my lips if I can help it--he,
When that I knew him fierce and turbulent
Refused her to him, then his pride awoke;
And since the proud man often is the mean,
He sowed a slander in the common ear,
Affirming that his father left him gold,
And in my charge, which was not rendered to him;
Bribed with large promises the men who served
About my person, the more easily
Because my means were somewhat broken into
Through open doors and hospitality;
Raised my own town against me in the night
Before my Enid's birthday, sacked my house;
From mine own earldom foully ousted me;
Built that new fort to overawe my friends,
For truly there are those who love me yet;
And keeps me in this ruinous castle here,
Where doubtless he would put me soon to death,
But that his pride too much despises me:
And I myself sometimes despise myself;
For I have let men be, and have their way;
Am much too gentle, have not used my power:
Nor know I whether I be very base
Or very manful, whether very wise
Or very foolish; only this I know,
That whatsoever evil happen to me,
I seem to suffer nothing heart or limb,
But can endure it all most patiently.'

'Well said, true heart,' replied Geraint, 'but arms,
That if the sparrow-hawk, this nephew, fight
In next day's tourney I may break his pride.'

And Yniol answered, 'Arms, indeed, but old
And rusty, old and rusty, Prince Geraint,
Are mine, and therefore at thy asking, thine.
But in this tournament can no man tilt,
Except the lady he loves best be there.
Two forks are fixt into the meadow ground,
And over these is placed a silver wand,
And over that a golden sparrow-hawk,
The prize of beauty for the fairest there.
And this, what knight soever be in field
Lays claim to for the lady at his side,
And tilts with my good nephew thereupon,
Who being apt at arms and big of bone
Has ever won it for the lady with him,
And toppling over all antagonism
Has earned himself the name of sparrow-hawk.'
But thou, that hast no lady, canst not fight.'

To whom Geraint with eyes all bright replied,
Leaning a little toward him, 'Thy leave!
Let ME lay lance in rest, O noble host,
For this dear child, because I never saw,
Though having seen all beauties of our time,
Nor can see elsewhere, anything so fair.
And if I fall her name will yet remain
Untarnished as before; but if I live,
So aid me Heaven when at mine uttermost,
As I will make her truly my true wife.'

Then, howsoever patient, Yniol's heart
Danced in his bosom, seeing better days,
And looking round he saw not Enid there,
(Who hearing her own name had stolen away)
But that old dame, to whom full tenderly
And folding all her hand in his he said,
'Mother, a maiden is a tender thing,
And best by her that bore her understood.
Go thou to rest, but ere thou go to rest
Tell her, and prove her heart toward the Prince.'

So spake the kindly-hearted Earl, and she
With frequent smile and nod departing found,
Half disarrayed as to her rest, the girl;
Whom first she kissed on either cheek, and then
On either shining shoulder laid a hand,
And kept her off and gazed upon her face,
And told them all their converse in the hall,
Proving her heart: but never light and shade
Coursed one another more on open ground
Beneath a troubled heaven, than red and pale
Across the face of Enid hearing her;
While slowly falling as a scale that falls,
When weight is added only grain by grain,
Sank her sweet head upon her gentle breast;
Nor did she lift an eye nor speak a word,
Rapt in the fear and in the wonder of it;
So moving without answer to her rest
She found no rest, and ever failed to draw
The quiet night into her blood, but lay
Contemplating her own unworthiness;
And when the pale and bloodless east began
To quicken to the sun, arose, and raised
Her mother too, and hand in hand they moved
Down to the meadow where the jousts were held,
And waited there for Yniol and Geraint.

And thither came the twain, and when Geraint
Beheld her first in field, awaiting him,
He felt, were she the prize of bodily force,
Himself beyond the rest pushing could move
The chair of Idris. Yniol's rusted arms
Were on his princely person, but through these
Princelike his bearing shone; and errant knights
And ladies came, and by and by the town
Flowed in, and settling circled all the lists.
And there they fixt the forks into the ground,
And over these they placed the silver wand,
And over that the golden sparrow-hawk.
Then Yniol's nephew, after trumpet blown,
Spake to the lady with him and proclaimed,
'Advance and take, as fairest of the fair,
What I these two years past have won for thee,
The prize of beauty.' Loudly spake the Prince,
'Forbear: there is a worthier,' and the knight
With some surprise and thrice as much disdain
Turned, and beheld the four, and all his face
Glowed like the heart of a great fire at Yule,
So burnt he was with passion, crying out,
'Do battle for it then,' no more; and thrice
They clashed together, and thrice they brake their spears.
Then each, dishorsed and drawing, lashed at each
So often and with such blows, that all the crowd
Wondered, and now and then from distant walls
There came a clapping as of phantom hands.
So twice they fought, and twice they breathed, and still
The dew of their great labour, and the blood
Of their strong bodies, flowing, drained their force.
But either's force was matched till Yniol's cry,
'Remember that great insult done the Queen,'
Increased Geraint's, who heaved his blade aloft,
And cracked the helmet through, and bit the bone,
And felled him, and set foot upon his breast,
And said, 'Thy name?' To whom the fallen man
Made answer, groaning, 'Edyrn, son of Nudd!
Ashamed am I that I should tell it thee.
My pride is broken: men have seen my fall.'
'Then, Edyrn, son of Nudd,' replied Geraint,
'These two things shalt thou do, or else thou diest.
First, thou thyself, with damsel and with dwarf,
Shalt ride to Arthur's court, and coming there,
Crave pardon for that insult done the Queen,
And shalt abide her judgment on it; next,
Thou shalt give back their earldom to thy kin.
These two things shalt thou do, or thou shalt die.'
And Edyrn answered, 'These things will I do,
For I have never yet been overthrown,
And thou hast overthrown me, and my pride
Is broken down, for Enid sees my fall!'
And rising up, he rode to Arthur's court,
And there the Queen forgave him easily.
And being young, he changed and came to loathe
His crime of traitor, slowly drew himself
Bright from his old dark life, and fell at last
In the great battle fighting for the King.

But when the third day from the hunting-morn
Made a low splendour in the world, and wings
Moved in her ivy, Enid, for she lay
With her fair head in the dim-yellow light,
Among the dancing shadows of the birds,
Woke and bethought her of her promise given
No later than last eve to Prince Geraint--
So bent he seemed on going the third day,
He would not leave her, till her promise given--
To ride with him this morning to the court,
And there be made known to the stately Queen,
And there be wedded with all ceremony.
At this she cast her eyes upon her dress,
And thought it never yet had looked so mean.
For as a leaf in mid-November is
To what it is in mid-October, seemed
The dress that now she looked on to the dress
She looked on ere the coming of Geraint.
And still she looked, and still the terror grew
Of that strange bright and dreadful thing, a court,
All staring at her in her faded silk:
And softly to her own sweet heart she said:

'This noble prince who won our earldom back,
So splendid in his acts and his attire,
Sweet heaven, how much I shall discredit him!
Would he could tarry with us here awhile,
But being so beholden to the Prince,
It were but little grace in any of us,
Bent as he seemed on going this third day,
To seek a second favour at his hands.
Yet if he could but tarry a day or two,
Myself would work eye dim, and finger lame,
Far liefer than so much discredit him.'

And Enid fell in longing for a dress
All branched and flowered with gold, a costly gift
Of her good mother, given her on the night
Before her birthday, three sad years ago,
That night of fire, when Edyrn sacked their house,
And scattered all they had to all the winds:
For while the mother showed it, and the two
Were turning and admiring it, the work
To both appeared so costly, rose a cry
That Edyrn's men were on them, and they fled
With little save the jewels they had on,
Which being sold and sold had bought them bread:
And Edyrn's men had caught them in their flight,
And placed them in this ruin; and she wished
The Prince had found her in her ancient home;
Then let her fancy flit across the past,
And roam the goodly places that she knew;
And last bethought her how she used to watch,
Near that old home, a pool of golden carp;
And one was patched and blurred and lustreless
Among his burnished brethren of the pool;
And half asleep she made comparison
Of that and these to her own faded self
And the gay court, and fell asleep again;
And dreamt herself was such a faded form
Among her burnished sisters of the pool;
But this was in the garden of a king;
And though she lay dark in the pool, she knew
That all was bright; that all about were birds
Of sunny plume in gilded trellis-work;
That all the turf was rich in plots that looked
Each like a garnet or a turkis in it;
And lords and ladies of the high court went
In silver tissue talking things of state;
And children of the King in cloth of gold
Glanced at the doors or gamboled down the walks;
And while she thought 'They will not see me,' came
A stately queen whose name was Guinevere,
And all the children in their cloth of gold
Ran to her, crying, 'If we have fish at all
Let them be gold; and charge the gardeners now
To pick the faded creature from the pool,
And cast it on the mixen that it die.'
And therewithal one came and seized on her,
And Enid started waking, with her heart
All overshadowed by the foolish dream,
And lo! it was her mother grasping her
To get her well awake; and in her hand
A suit of bright apparel, which she laid
Flat on the couch, and spoke exultingly:

'See here, my child, how fresh the colours look,
How fast they hold like colours of a shell
That keeps the wear and polish of the wave.
Why not? It never yet was worn, I trow:
Look on it, child, and tell me if ye know it.'

And Enid looked, but all confused at first,
Could scarce divide it from her foolish dream:
Then suddenly she knew it and rejoiced,
And answered, 'Yea, I know it; your good gift,
So sadly lost on that unhappy night;
Your own good gift!' 'Yea, surely,' said the dame,
'And gladly given again this happy morn.
For when the jousts were ended yesterday,
Went Yniol through the town, and everywhere
He found the sack and plunder of our house
All scattered through the houses of the town;
And gave command that all which once was ours
Should now be ours again: and yester-eve,
While ye were talking sweetly with your Prince,
Came one with this and laid it in my hand,
For love or fear, or seeking favour of us,
Because we have our earldom back again.
And yester-eve I would not tell you of it,
But kept it for a sweet surprise at morn.
Yea, truly is it not a sweet surprise?
For I myself unwillingly have worn
My faded suit, as you, my child, have yours,
And howsoever patient, Yniol his.
Ah, dear, he took me from a goodly house,
With store of rich apparel, sumptuous fare,
And page, and maid, and squire, and seneschal,
And pastime both of hawk and hound, and all
That appertains to noble maintenance.
Yea, and he brought me to a goodly house;
But since our fortune swerved from sun to shade,
And all through that young traitor, cruel need
Constrained us, but a better time has come;
So clothe yourself in this, that better fits
Our mended fortunes and a Prince's bride:
For though ye won the prize of fairest fair,
And though I heard him call you fairest fair,
Let never maiden think, however fair,
She is not fairer in new clothes than old.
And should some great court-lady say, the Prince
Hath picked a ragged-robin from the hedge,
And like a madman brought her to the court,
Then were ye shamed, and, worse, might shame the Prince
To whom we are beholden; but I know,
That when my dear child is set forth at her best,
That neither court nor country, though they sought
Through all the provinces like those of old
That lighted on Queen Esther, has her match.'

Here ceased the kindly mother out of breath;
And Enid listened brightening as she lay;
Then, as the white and glittering star of morn
Parts from a bank of snow, and by and by
Slips into golden cloud, the maiden rose,
And left her maiden couch, and robed herself,
Helped by the mother's careful hand and eye,
Without a mirror, in the gorgeous gown;
Who, after, turned her daughter round, and said,
She never yet had seen her half so fair;
And called her like that maiden in the tale,
Whom Gwydion made by glamour out of flowers
And sweeter than the bride of Cassivelaun,
Flur, for whose love the Roman Csar first
Invaded Britain, 'But we beat him back,
As this great Prince invaded us, and we,
Not beat him back, but welcomed him with joy
And I can scarcely ride with you to court,
For old am I, and rough the ways and wild;
But Yniol goes, and I full oft shall dream
I see my princess as I see her now,
Clothed with my gift, and gay among the gay.'

But while the women thus rejoiced, Geraint
Woke where he slept in the high hall, and called
For Enid, and when Yniol made report
Of that good mother making Enid gay
In such apparel as might well beseem
His princess, or indeed the stately Queen,
He answered: 'Earl, entreat her by my love,
Albeit I give no reason but my wish,
That she ride with me in her faded silk.'
Yniol with that hard message went; it fell
Like flaws in summer laying lusty corn:
For Enid, all abashed she knew not why,
Dared not to glance at her good mother's face,
But silently, in all obedience,
Her mother silent too, nor helping her,
Laid from her limbs the costly-broidered gift,
And robed them in her ancient suit again,
And so descended. Never man rejoiced
More than Geraint to greet her thus attired;
And glancing all at once as keenly at her
As careful robins eye the delver's toil,
Made her cheek burn and either eyelid fall,
But rested with her sweet face satisfied;
Then seeing cloud upon the mother's brow,
Her by both hands she caught, and sweetly said,

'O my new mother, be not wroth or grieved
At thy new son, for my petition to her.
When late I left Caerleon, our great Queen,
In words whose echo lasts, they were so sweet,
Made promise, that whatever bride I brought,
Herself would clothe her like the sun in Heaven.
Thereafter, when I reached this ruined hall,
Beholding one so bright in dark estate,
I vowed that could I gain her, our fair Queen,
No hand but hers, should make your Enid burst
Sunlike from cloud--and likewise thought perhaps,
That service done so graciously would bind
The two together; fain I would the two
Should love each other: how can Enid find
A nobler friend? Another thought was mine;
I came among you here so suddenly,
That though her gentle presence at the lists
Might well have served for proof that I was loved,
I doubted whether daughter's tenderness,
Or easy nature, might not let itself
Be moulded by your wishes for her weal;
Or whether some false sense in her own self
Of my contrasting brightness, overbore
Her fancy dwelling in this dusky hall;
And such a sense might make her long for court
And all its perilous glories: and I thought,
That could I someway prove such force in her
Linked with such love for me, that at a word
(No reason given her) she could cast aside
A splendour dear to women, new to her,
And therefore dearer; or if not so new,
Yet therefore tenfold dearer by the power
Of intermitted usage; then I felt
That I could rest, a rock in ebbs and flows,
Fixt on her faith. Now, therefore, I do rest,
A prophet certain of my prophecy,
That never shadow of mistrust can cross
Between us. Grant me pardon for my thoughts:
And for my strange petition I will make
Amends hereafter by some gaudy-day,
When your fair child shall wear your costly gift
Beside your own warm hearth, with, on her knees,
Who knows? another gift of the high God,
Which, maybe, shall have learned to lisp you thanks.'

He spoke: the mother smiled, but half in tears,
Then brought a mantle down and wrapt her in it,
And claspt and kissed her, and they rode away.

Now thrice that morning Guinevere had climbed
The giant tower, from whose high crest, they say,
Men saw the goodly hills of Somerset,
And white sails flying on the yellow sea;
But not to goodly hill or yellow sea
Looked the fair Queen, but up the vale of Usk,
By the flat meadow, till she saw them come;
And then descending met them at the gates,
Embraced her with all welcome as a friend,
And did her honour as the Prince's bride,
And clothed her for her bridals like the sun;
And all that week was old Caerleon gay,
For by the hands of Dubric, the high saint,
They twain were wedded with all ceremony.

And this was on the last year's Whitsuntide.
But Enid ever kept the faded silk,
Remembering how first he came on her,
Drest in that dress, and how he loved her in it,
And all her foolish fears about the dress,
And all his journey toward her, as himself
Had told her, and their coming to the court.

And now this morning when he said to her,
'Put on your worst and meanest dress,' she found
And took it, and arrayed herself therein.

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Hear The Children Crying.

I can hear their voices,
listen carefully you'll here them too,
be attentive, you can feel their pain,
but don't just sit there to observe their tears.

just move move your eyes here and there,
you'll hear them around the world,
move your eyes to middle east,
take them to Iraq and Afghanistan,

don't end up there,
go and have a rest in Africa,

If you have strength,
just go around and observe,

A Son of Somali land starving,
A Daughter of Sudan land dying,
Twelve years old girl of Congo raped,
Ooh! just their sound of pain.

I can feel what hurts most,
those they depend on, lean on,
are the Beast who turn on them,
What they care most is what they desire.

Their sound of pain,
is like a music in the Bar,
or a love whisper in the bed room.

Ooh please World,
hear them out, as politics won't,
console them, as they have been abandoned,
rescue them, as they have lost faith,
please, be humble to them, as they've fear hunting them.

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Tears..Peace..Night Smile..Fear..Time..Fate. The Seven Oceans Of Pain

Swimming across the first ocean, i met my friend-tears
he has been living there, for so many many years
he keeps count of all the tears, i have shed
on every tear, her name is tagged, and my future is read.

Swimming across the second ocean, i met my friend-peace
he left me, the day my heart shattered to pieces
im the master of peace, said, he'll keep the shattered pieces whole
i'll hand your heart over to you, when i departure with your soul.

Swimming across the third ocean, i met my friend-night
he lives there holding on to my dreams so very tight
in every dream, there's a showcase, a portrait of my never ending love
love, love destiny only lies in the heavens above.

Swimming across the fourth ocean, i met my friend :) smile
he deserted me the day she refused to walk down the aisle
capturing all the sadness that lies beneath my face
he said go i'll keep them safe, there'll be in your memory for you to chase.

Swimming across the fifth ocean, i met my friend fear
everytime i try to go in search of her
he appeares in my way with a sing that signals this is the end
i fear not, i fear not, i fear not, for my heart is damaged and will it ever mend?

Swimming across the sixth ocean, i met my friend-time
he laughed and said, your late thats a crime, yes a crime of loving her
thats what happens when you love someone more than what you could do
now my friend, you have to wait in line, for your portal to let you through.

Swimming across the seventh ocean, i met my friend fate
care in his eyes, you know love is a hard journey, and not all can enter its gate
in every journey you take my friend, the pain will always remain
for you to succeed you have to cross the Seven Oceans Of Pain.


My friends
Tears..Peace..Night
Smile..Fear..Time..Fat e.
The Seven Oceans Of Pain.
Written in Salma Torrez's notes
since 2001
Copyright.

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Lenexa Baptist Church Poet Tom Zart's = HEAVEN’S HEROES

HEAVEN’S HEROES


Winning souls tend to change everything
Including who and what we are.
When our darkness within transforms to light
And our eyes have the luster of a star.

We must always pray for the lost among us
Who eagerly race toward the wrong direction.
So they may know their own repentance
Blessed by Gods, grace, love and protection.

All of Heaven’s heroes have suffered remorse
From hate, fear, lust, loneliness and war.
They do what they do with deliverance of heart
Defeating the dark side of life and more.

Noah found safety within the beams of his ark
To endure Heaven’s cleansing of earth.
Moses the deliverer, climbed a mountain
Descending with Gods guidelines of worth.

David the shepherd, a boy among men
Slew evil’s giant with a flying stone.
Samson the strong man broke from his chains
Toppling the temple with Gods help alone.

Jonah was swallowed by a monster fish
To be cast up on shore with a prophecy to tell.
Jesus of Nazareth was nailed to the cross
And without His forgiveness we’re doomed to fail.

Lord Ill feel blessed to greet all your heroes
When it is my time to escape my woes.
Ill clutch their hands and kiss their face
As we celebrate the journey we chose.


GODS WISPERS


Think of young David when he faced the giant
With nothing but his sling and five stones.
He listened to God and ran forth to glory
Toppling Goliath for birds, to pluck his bones.

When we fully surrender our soul to God
Our life is complete without blame.
Our heart beats to the joy of fulfillment
As we no longer shoulder our shame.

The more we heed to the whispers of God
The more we achieve His glorious goal.
All through life we escape temptation
Responding to evil with pureness of soul.

God keeps no secrets from all who love Him
When they repent and obey His voice.
He speaks to those who truly conform
And follow His doctrine by choice.

When we listen to God our fears fade away
And all He has proclaimed shall be.
Our trust in His love, grace and protection
Allows us to be modified, by Thee.


DAVID AND GOLIATH


David, the shepherd, a tender of sheep
Would pray to his God before he would sleep.
One day he awoke to the roar of beasts
A bear and a lion in search of a feast.

David slew both with his knife and his hand
Though still just a boy and not yet a man.
The Lord's love for David was proven once again
When he challenged the champion of the Philistine men.

Goliath's beastly fingers and hideous toes
Made David more selective with the stones that he chose.
One for the giant, he knew he would slay
Four more for his brothers who were laughing that day.

The giant told David, 'I'll tear you apart;
The birds and the animals shall feast on your heart.'
David yelled back, 'I'll soon see you dead
And when I'm through I'll cut off your head! '

The worst of all men, drew high with his arm
Came forth to David to do him great harm.
The youth jumped ahead just as quick as a lynx
A stone from his sling popped the giant where he thinks.

Blood and bone spewed forth as that devil fell down;
A thousand pound soldier lie dead on the ground.
With Goliath's own sword, David chopped off his head
Then took it to Jerusalem, to prove he was dead.


JESUS


There once was a traveler who was driven out of town
On his shoulders was a burden that pushed him to the ground.

On his head was a crown made of thorns from a bush
And the street was so crowded the guards had to push.

They beat him with nine tails each step of the way
Where Christ found the strength, only God could say.

They stopped at some sandstone at the top of a hill
There was a round hole the cross would soon fill.

They made him lie down upon that wood cross
There they nailed him to prove who was boss.

The beam was up-ended by the muscles of men
As it plunged down the hole it was carved to fit in.

Then Jesus looked up at the lightning that flew
And cried, 'God, My Father, they know not what they do.'

They crucified our Lord as his blood flowed to earth
If inside you believe, you feel what love is worth.

They wrapped him in loincloth when he was taken down
Then carefully removed his scarlet stained crown.

They placed him in a cave with a large, round, stone door
Before sealing forever, they lay lilies on the floor.

Though it wasn't very long, and the stone was rolled away
For Jesus resurrected, to rise on Easter Day!


NOAH'S ARK


God saw that wickedness had fouled his earth
To a state it could no longer be ignored.
While grieving sadly He chose to destroy it
Though Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord.

The Lord told Noah to fashion a great ark
Made of gopher wood and pitch, outside and in.
Three hundred cubits long and fifty in width
Before the world he knew, would come to its end.

Bring your food, your sons, your wife and your son's wives
And two of every living sort, be with thee.
For with you I'll establish my covenant
And all who are with thee shall survive the sea.

They all marched forth, two by two, into the ark
And waited for God's waters to flood the land.
For forty days and for forty nights
The fountains of the deep consumed beast and man.

Inside the ark nostrils kept their breath of life
As the high waters prevailed upon the earth.
Every mountain and every hilltop vanished
As all within felt the power of God's worth.

The waters from heaven were finally restrained
And after ten months the tops of mountains were seen.
God had blessed Noah and all who had joined him
To multiply, plant and fulfill His dream.


SERVING GOD'S PURPOSE


Theres only one trip through life and thats it;
So what are you leaving for those left behind?
Will they miss your wisdom and unselfish love
Or will there be laughter, happiness and words unkind?

You may live your life as wicked as the devil
And regardless of your sins God still loves you.
But when you serve His purpose and intent
Youre transformed by His grace and renew.

You cant convince me nothing really happens
When righteous men gather, confess and pray.
God has His purpose for all who submit
To His commandments for believers to obey.

Always be ready to fight your battles on your knees
Before and after you are tested by time.
Never underestimate the power of Gods will
And what happens when your purpose is “Divine”.


ACCOUNTABILITY


All of us are accountable to the judgment of God
And when we die without Christ our sadness never ends.
By the deepest longings of our heart and soul
We serve our Lord, ourselves, family and friends.

With accountability we apply Gods wisdom
And His protection to promote a righteous life.
We receive His grace by our demeanor
As He leads us through sadness and strife.

All through the Bible over and over again
The chronicle of life is our accountability.
The devil is a roaring lion feasting on souls
Corrupting man’s heart with dominance and disability.

Always remember you are never alone
And God is aware of all things around you.
Through faith, prayer, trust, love and comment
We find fulfillment and purpose in the life we pursue.


ABRAHAM


Abraham is said to be the father of the Jewish faith
The first to believe in the power of one great god alone.
Instead of the many his forefather's worshiped
In Abraham's heart there was only room for one to be known.

With his wife Sarah and his nephew Lot
At 75 he departed to seek the Promised Land.
With followers he arrived at a place called Canaan
Where he prospered by hard work and God's hand.

Then famine in the land drove him to Egypt
Where Abraham and Lot grew rich in cattle, silver and gold.
They had so many sheep that their shepherds quarreled
Over grazing land, water and jealousies of old.

Abraham and Lot agreed to live separate
Lot chose Sodom and Abraham Hebron.
When the armies of four great kings took Lot captive
Abraham and 318 of his bravest, to the rescue, were gone.

Afterward, to Sodom and neighboring Gomorrah
Lot was brought back with his worldly goods and treasure.
But soon the inhabitants of both became wicked
Shamming the Lord and shunning His measure.

God told Abraham, I will soon demolish them
For there is not one of righteousness among all.
However, he warned Lot to escape with his wife
And not to look back and ignore His law.

Lot's wife looked back and was transformed to salt
While Lot, through observance of word, was spared.
Abraham, then 99 and Sarah at 90
Were still without child in the life they shared.

Arabs claim they are descendant from Ishmael,
At 86 Abraham's son, by Sarah's handmaiden, Hagar.
Sarah believed she was too old to bare a child
So she gave Hagar to Abraham to conceive a star.

God had promised Abraham a son by Sarah
And that his descendants will out number the stars.
In time a boy named Isaac was born
Free of all birth defects, disease and scars.

Later when Isaac was still just a child
God chose to test Abraham again.
Commanding him to take Isaac to the top of a mountain
And there, by sacrifice, put his life to its end.

Abraham built an alter of wood sticks, pilled high
Bound up Isaac and laid him within them.
Just as he was about to put the knife to his son
God stopped him and said: lay not thy hand upon him.

The Lord told Abraham, I know now you fear Me
Seeing that you have not withheld your son.
Then Abraham sacrificed a lamb provided
And God blessed him for what he had done.

The Bible says Abraham died at 175
And that Sarah lived to be 127.
Christians and Muslims both traced their faith
To Abraham's commitment to one God and Heaven.


IT'S NOT HOW WE START IT'S HOW WE FINISH

It's not how we start it's how we finish
That lets others know how much we care.
We make our mistakes and pray to God
For all His blessings beyond compare.

God and Satan both whisper to every ear
For they know our soul control our passions.
The outcomes of life both joyful and sad
Teach which voice rewards or rations.

All Heaven's heroes except for Jesus
Had to be forgiven for their willingness to stray.
They let God down and paid the price
And their stories still relate today.


By Gods Poet Tom Zart
Most Published Poet
On The Web

To Read Or Listen To Tom Zart’s Poems Go To =

http: //new.pivtr.com/en/schedule/tom-zart/
http: //www.veteranstodayforum.com/viewforum.php? f=38

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Patrick White

The Angel In The Way I'm Wrestling With

The angel in the way I'm wrestling with
won't box. I don't get a choice of weapons.
My hip dislocated by a greater intensity than I am,
I'll walk away the stronger man,
a sacred king with a limp, Richard the Second,
or Vulcan, or Byron swimming the Hellespont.
Down on a sunny day, snarly in the sunshine,
too disheartened to get with the picture and bloom.
Nothing against the vases of sappy daffodils
in green vases on open windowsills,
but I feel like tracking starmud into the living room.
Heavy green diamond steel-toed work boots
with their laces undone, their tongues hanging out,
clotted with earth, so the nuns of the narcissi
don't forget they've got dark, dirty roots
and bulbs like prophetic skulls
that have been buried in the garden a long time
who predicted all this would happen in due course.
Everyone clear-eyed as a haiku in a mirror.
Wholly out of season, my heart feels
like the heavy bell of a requiem for all those
who worked themselves to death for so long
like sweating horses hauling this death cart
of a planet around to change its point of view
like the bent axle of a prayer wheel
inclined toward the sun. On this blue-eyed day
and in the morning before dawn, euphoric commotion
of birdsong in celebration of the return of the light,
but I think of how much darkness, the cast off ore,
extinct forests, Jurassic coalbins,
had to clarify themselves
for the sake of a single diamond of equinoctial insight.
The apple trees are wearing their appearances
on their sleeves, and the willows
are adding blonde streaks to their hair
after their long widowhood of veils.
God I wish I didn't have to be a poet sometimes
warped into revealing things from the inside out
like a canary in a coalmine on a sunny day.
I try to imagine how sweet it would feel
just to be in the world like a lackadaisical dandelion
blooming like an average G type sun
in the fresh painterly green of the grass
with a couple of ants for planets.
What a miner I'd make. Always
looking for a motherlode of ore in a gold mine.
Reading between the lines of the spring constellations
to admire the brilliance of the darker messenger,
the deeper clarity of a more pellucid view of the world
as it appears on the nightshift
in the black mirrors of the blind chandeliers
I've been romancing at a dance of celestial spheres
by tracking my footprints all over the ballroom floor
for those who dance iambically with a limp like me to follow.
And my only alibi for looking at things on the dark side.
You can't plumb the depths, or judge the age
of a black hole in light years. And it's totally lost upon me
how you can truly claim to see anything, even spring
if you're not a two-eyed telescope, one eye on day,
one eye on the darkness, and both open simultaneously
like the sun and the moon at opposite ends of the sky,
and the earth in between like the third eye
of a spiritual refugee with an extra lens for backup
in case I should feel as I do today
like a star-nosed mole with tunnel vision
trying to shine above ground with the tulips.
Even as observatories all over the northern hemisphere
are opening their eyes to the light
just to let a little fresh air in
like house plants on open tenement windowsills
sinking their roots deeper into the darkness,
like back lightning into a mystic watershed
to keep from going blind
in the blazing of the blossom overhead.

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Tim Tebow = SERVING GOD, MOMENT BY MOMENT & HEAVEN'S HEROES!

SERVING GOD, MOMENT BY MOMENT & HEAVEN'S HEROES!

There's only one trip through life and that's it;
So what are you leaving for those left behind?
Will they miss your wisdom and unselfish love
Or will there be laughter, happiness and words unkind?

You may live your life as wicked as the devil
And regardless of your sins God still loves you.
But when you serve His purpose and intent
You're transformed by His grace and renew.

You can't convince me nothing really happens
When righteous men gather, confess and pray.
God has His purpose for all who submit
To His commandments for believers to obey.

Always be ready to fight your battles on your knees
Before and after you are tested by time.
Never underestimate the power of God's will
And what happens when your purpose is "Divine".

MOMENT BY MOMENT

Moment by moment we must listen to our sprit
As God speaks through our soul within.
When we fail to comply and go our own way
We're disobedient and suffer the punishment of sin.

The Devil whispers in each and every ear
And his favorite tool of corruption is fear.
But when we totally summit to our faith in God
We turn away from temptation and our destiny is clear.

Remember all the times you have had shameful thoughts
And there was a voice that warned you to beware.
Our holey sprit helps us stay hole and complete
When we heed to its call without hesitation or despair.

Surrender your soul to the power of God
And your life will be a testimony of love.
Surrender your heart to the deeds of evil
And you will loose your deliverance above.

HEAVEN'S HEROES

Winning souls tend to change everything
Including who and what we are.
When our darkness within transforms to light
And our eyes have the luster of a star.

We must always pray for the lost among us
Who eagerly race toward the wrong direction.
So they may know their own repentance
Blessed by God's, grace, love and protection.

All of Heaven's heroes have suffered remorse
From hate, fear, lust, loneliness and war.
They do what they do with deliverance of heart
Defeating the dark side of life and more.

Noah found safety within the beams of his ark
To endure Heaven's cleansing of earth.
Moses the deliverer, climbed a mountain
Descending with God's guidelines of worth.

David the shepherd, a boy among men
Slew evil's giant with a flying stone.
Samson the strong man broke from his chains
Toppling the temple with God's help alone.

Jonah was swallowed by a monster fish
To be cast up on shore with a prophecy to tell.
Jesus of Nazareth was nailed to the cross
And without His forgiveness we're doomed to fail.

Lord I'll feel blessed to greet all your heroes
When it is my time to escape my woes.
I'll clutch their hands and kiss their face
As we celebrate the journey we chose.

GOD'S WISPERS

Think of young David when he faced the giant
With nothing but his sling and five stones.
He listened to God and ran forth to glory
Toppling Goliath for birds, to pluck his bones.

When we fully surrender our soul to God
Our life is complete without blame.
Our heart beats to the joy of fulfillment
As we no longer shoulder our shame.

The more we heed to the whispers of God
The more we achieve His glorious goal.
All through life we escape temptation
Responding to evil with pureness of soul.

God keeps no secrets from all who love Him
When they repent and obey His voice.
He speaks to those who truly conform
And follow His doctrine by choice.

When we listen to God our fears fade away
And all He has proclaimed shall be.
Our trust in His love, grace and protection
Allows us to be modified, by Thee.

Tom Zart's 456 Poems Are Free To Share To Teach Or Show Support!
By God's Poet
Tom Zart
Most Published Poet
On The Web!

To Listen To Tom Zart's Poems Go To =
http: //new.pivtr.com/en/schedule/tom-zart/
www.bill crain.net/musicpage.htm
http: //www.veteranstodayforum.com/viewforum.php? f=38

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Tim Tebow Poem = MY FAVORITE POET IS = GOD!

MY FAVORITE POET IS = GOD!

My favorite poet is God above
Who gives Earth its rhythm and rhyme.
Not pied pipers of misguided souls
Who promote distrust, hatred and crime.

Poetry is nature serenading in song
The peaceful roar of the oceans waves.
The wind through the trees and over the hills
And the flowers in the fields by the graves.

The sound of rain as it waters the thirsty
The songs of children at play in the park.
The far off rumble of trains or thunder
As they pass through the night in the dark.

The joy of our babies first words and steps
The passion of life with its heroes and clowns.
The on going struggle to survive our sins
As we proliferate in hamlets and towns.

My favorite poet is our Father of love
Who was first to know us before birth.
His poetry prolongs every thing we love
As His deliverance gives life its worth.

HEAVEN'S HEROES

Winning souls tend to change everything
Including who and what we are.
When our darkness within transforms to light
And our eyes have the luster of a star.

We must always pray for the lost among us
Who eagerly race toward the wrong direction.
So they may know their own repentance
Blessed by God's, grace, love and protection.

All of Heaven's heroes have suffered remorse
From hate, fear, lust, loneliness and war.
They do what they do with deliverance of heart
Defeating the dark side of life and more.

Noah found safety within the beams of his ark
To endure Heaven's cleansing of earth.
Moses the deliverer, climbed a mountain
Descending with God's guidelines of worth.

David the shepherd, a boy among men
Slew evil's giant with a flying stone.
Samson the strong man broke from his chains
Toppling the temple with God's help alone.

Jonah was swallowed by a monster fish
To be cast up on shore with a prophecy to tell.
Jesus of Nazareth was nailed to the cross
And without His forgiveness we're doomed to fail.

Lord I'll feel blessed to greet all your heroes
When it is my time to escape my woes.
I'll clutch their hands and kiss their face
As we celebrate the journey we chose.

GOD'S WISPERS

Think of young David when he faced the giant
With nothing but his sling and five stones.
He listened to God and ran forth to glory
Toppling Goliath for birds, to pluck his bones.

When we fully surrender our soul to God
Our life is complete without blame.
Our heart beats to the joy of fulfillment
As we no longer shoulder our shame.

The more we heed to the whispers of God
The more we achieve His glorious goal.
All through life we escape temptation
Responding to evil with pureness of soul.

God keeps no secrets from all who love Him
When they repent and obey His voice.
He speaks to those who truly conform
And follow His doctrine by choice.

When we listen to God our fears fade away
And all He has proclaimed shall be.
Our trust in His love, grace and protection
Allows us to be modified, by Thee.

THE DISTORTION OF MAN

We're sought by Satan of that I'm sure
As he plots to derail our soul.
Greed, hate, lust, anger and fear
Are deeds which facilitate his goal.

He smiles at lies, cheating and theft
He laughs at never-ending war.
He drools to conquer the hearts of man
Shadowing every window and door.

Tempting all with unclean pleasures
His success is weakness and desire.
We triumph only through the power of faith
Avoiding eternal torment and fire.

Goodness and evil illustrate life
Like the two sides of every coin.
Most can't help but experience both
As we learn who to trust, follow and join.

Praise our Lord for morals and ethics
The laws of Heavenly command.
Without God's armor and His grace
We become the distortion of man.

Tom Zart's 458 Poems Are Free To Share To Teach Or Show Support!
By God's Poet
Tom Zart
Most Published Poet
On The Web!

To Listen To Tom Zart's Poems Go To =
http: //new.pivtr.com/en/schedule/tom-zart/
www.bill crain.net/musicpage.htm
http: //www.veteranstodayforum.com/viewforum.php? f=38

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Lenexa Baptist Chruch = Heaven’s Heroes

HEAVEN’S HEROES


Winning souls tend to change everything
Including who and what we are.
When our darkness within transforms to light
And our eyes have the luster of a star.

We must always pray for the lost among us
Who eagerly race toward the wrong direction.
So they may know their own repentance
Blessed by Gods, grace, love and protection.

All of Heaven’s heroes have suffered remorse
From hate, fear, lust, loneliness and war.
They do what they do with deliverance of heart
Defeating the dark side of life and more.

Noah found safety within the beams of his ark
To endure Heaven’s cleansing of earth.
Moses the deliverer, climbed a mountain
Descending with Gods guidelines of worth.

David the shepherd, a boy among men
Slew evil’s giant with a flying stone.
Samson the strong man broke from his chains
Toppling the temple with Gods help alone.

Jonah was swallowed by a monster fish
To be cast up on shore with a prophecy to tell.
Jesus of Nazareth was nailed to the cross
And without His forgiveness we’re doomed to fail.

Lord Ill feel blessed to greet all your heroes
When it is my time to escape my woes.
Ill clutch their hands and kiss their face
As we celebrate the journey we chose.


GODS WISPERS


Think of young David when he faced the giant
With nothing but his sling and five stones.
He listened to God and ran forth to glory
Toppling Goliath for birds, to pluck his bones.

When we fully surrender our soul to God
Our life is complete without blame.
Our heart beats to the joy of fulfillment
As we no longer shoulder our shame.

The more we heed to the whispers of God
The more we achieve His glorious goal.
All through life we escape temptation
Responding to evil with pureness of soul.

God keeps no secrets from all who love Him
When they repent and obey His voice.
He speaks to those who truly conform
And follow His doctrine by choice.

When we listen to God our fears fade away
And all He has proclaimed shall be.
Our trust in His love, grace and protection
Allows us to be modified, by Thee.


THE DISTORTION OF MAN


We’re sought by Satan of that I’m sure
As he plots to derail our soul.
Greed, hate, lust, anger and fear
Are deeds which facilitate his goal.

He smiles at lies, cheating and theft
He laughs at never-ending war.
He drools to conquer the hearts of man
Shadowing every window and door.

Tempting all with unclean pleasures
His success is weakness and desire.
We triumph only through the power of faith
Avoiding eternal torment and fire.

Goodness and evil illustrate life
Like the two sides of every coin.
Most cant help but experience both
As we learn who to trust, follow and join.

Praise our Lord for morals and ethics
The laws of Heavenly command.
Without Gods armor and His grace
We become the distortion of man.


THE RIVER OF NO RETURN


Beware of the streams of evil
Feeding the river of no return.
Where whatever gives us pleasure
Is our only worry and concern.

True happiness results from blessings
Handed down from Heaven to earth.
God seems to smile on people in love
Who have chosen to share their worth.

Three types of humans occupy earth
The bad, the not so bad and the horrible.
Somewhere in-between, most us are
And our babies are most adorable.

Far to many become disappointing
Mimicking adults as they stretch and grow.
Lost somewhere in self-indulgence
In a world they have yet to know.

Thanks to faith and spiritual teachings
Multitudes follow the path of grace.
The righteous are the hope of man
As we journey the dangers of space.

Reject what is selfish; cruel and unkind
Steer clear of evil deeds without fear.
Listen to the voice of God in man
And youll remain more civilized and clear.


THE FIRST ONE TO LOVE ME


The first one to love me was You; Lord
And nothing can take that away.
My soul is refreshed by living water
While my heart flows with love each day.

I thank You for the love of my family
And I thank You for the love of my life.
I thank You for all of the blessings
You give to each husband and wife.

Your glory rides high on the sunsets
Your voice is the thunder of rain.
I thank You for all of the heavens
And Jesus who came to be slain.

I feel when Your eyes are upon me
As You listen to my humble cry,
You've redeemed the soul of Your servant
To dwell in Your mansion on high.

I'll claim each and every promise
From the Lord of the earth and sky.
I'm so glad I'm free from my bondage
Of the grave where my body shall lie.

I thank You for parting the darkness
And guiding my footsteps each day.
I thank You for being my shepherd
You've walked with me all the way.

I know Your armor protects me
From the devil in search of his feast.
And all who are lost without You
Shall dwell in hell with the beast!

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Lenexa Baptist Church Poet Tom Zart’s = Christian Quotable Quotes Of Life!

TOM ZART’S CHRISTIAN QUOTABLE QUOTES


THE POWER of WORDS


Words are the most powerful tools used by man
As hearts and souls reach for one another.
Sharing feelings of fear, wisdom and joy
Or our love for a significant other.

Where would we be without words
Which inspire, unite and motivate.
Songs, poems, stories, blogs, books
wars, religion, love, lust and hate.

Jesus preached words to the multitudes
And nourish their hunger within.
The stories we tell portray our spirit
As examples of weakness, triumph or sin.

When we fail to control the rage of our thoughts
What is easy to say becomes hard to forgive.
Words are visions which portray our intent
The better we communicate, the better we live.


WINE


Wine was served at the Last Supper
And guzzled in King Arthur's court.
Wine can make a sad man happy
And a mean woman turn good sport!


HEAVEN'S HEROES


All of Heaven’s heroes have suffered remorse
From hate, fear, lust, loneliness and war.
They do what they do with deliverance of heart
Defeating the dark side of life and more.


TEARS


Tears are a love-mates humble gift
When it's time to say goodbye
Though the eyes are wet and swollen
With time and patience they dry.


THE BELL RINGERS OF THE SOUL


Poets are the bell ringers of the soul
As they depict the past, the present and beyond.
They sound their alarm of what lies ahead
As the missteps of man live on.


MOTHERS


Mothers have great big aprons
To hide from the world our flaws.
They kiss and scold when we do wrong
Teaching compliance of laws.


HEAVEN'S GATE


With one foot in heaven and one down on earth
I pray to be remembered and judged by my worth.
If I’m forced to camp, just outside your gate
I will still be grateful and not, “hesitate.”


SELF-SERVING FOOLS


No matter how far in your marriage you've gone
The highway of love has its rules.
The excitement of sex, trust and affection
Never tolerates self-serving fools.


FOREVER MORE
I love to be loved in the morning
I love to be loved at night.
I love to be loved anytime
For love in the darkness is light.


LOVE AND LIFE


With one foot in the future
And one foot in the past
Let us try to live our days
As though each was our last.


FREEDOM


America has survived all attempts to destroy
Knowing the cruelty of war
And, we who remain
Must help keep her free
For those who can march no more!


A GOOD POEM


A good poem paints a picture
For both your heart and brain.
It doesn't need a second chance
To make its meaning plain.


HOW LUCKY I'VE BEEN


Wise men learn more from watching fools
Than fools do from watching wise men.
I should know for I've been both.
I can 't believe how lucky I've been.


BIRDS


Birds are really quite remarkable
When left alone to do their thing.
We have robbed their eggs and plucked their plumage
And yet they continue to sing.
FAITH


Our confidence and trust in a higher power
Helps guide us through every moment and hour.
Fidelity to ones promise and observance of law
Lets our Lord know we heed his call.


HISTORY


Some have asked why must we study history;
It just encourages us to live in the past.
When we forget history we repeat its mistake
As the outcome of humanity is cast.


RESOLUTE


May God continue to bless America
Refusing evil, the upper hand.
Its up to us to stay resolute
Defending the liberty of Man.


FORGIVE ME


I love you and I need you
It's a fact and not a lie
So if you plan to punish me
Say anything, but good bye.


FRIENDSHIP


Better is a good friend in the house next door
Than brothers and sisters who are far away.
The spirit of man needs the help of its friends
To face all the problems of each fleeting day.

SPRING


Gone till next year, are winters cold days of chill
While the fever of love hits the ground on the run.
There's heavenly splendor wherever we look
As earth is warmed by the rays of the sun.


FLOWERS


King Solomon spoke of earths flowers in the Bible
And that where they appear the birds begin to sing.
The voices of love can be heard across the land
And that lilies and roses are a sacred thing.


LOVE & ELECTRICITY


Love and electricity are a lot alike
For we never seem to miss them till their gone.
We need both every day of our life
And even more so between twilight and dawn.


SMILE


The one thing that goes the furthest
Towards making our lives more worthwhile
Which costs the least but does the most
Is the sight of a friendly smile.


ADVICE


Those who wish to advise others
Should practice what they preach
For their pupils need inspiring
To listen to what they teach.

MY WIFE


Heaven won't be heaven
If I don 't see you there
May the first to go
Be me, is my prayer.


FLIGHT


Nothing else man can conceive
Is more luring than God's sky.
To be as one with the stars
Is the wish of all who fly.


TWILIGHT


The twilight is first evening's bell
A time of peace when all is well.
Another day has come and gone
Not to return until the dawn.


EYES OF LOVE


Eyes that twinkle, I distrust
For they are the distant stars.
Eyes in love have a steady glow
Like Venus, the Moon or Mars.


MY FAVORITE POET


My favorite poet is our father of love
Who was first to know us before birth.
His poetry prolongs every thing we love
As his deliverance gives life its worth.

INTEGRITY


What Satan has planned for our harm
Integrity will transform to good.
Adhering to morals gives us peace
Teaching us to respond, as we should.


FORMIDABLE FOE


America is the birthday cake of earth
As the ants march from every direction.
Thank God for all who have sworn to defend her
Serving with love, honor, pride and affection.


PEACE


War is an emotional release for man
Practiced since the first stones were cast.
Could it be nature's way of thinning the numbers
As the fallen are consumed by the past.


ORDINARY MOMENTS


Even ordinary moments
Aren't the same any more.
Together we have so much
To plan, accomplish and explore.


DIVINE INTERVENTION


What would our world become
Without intervention from above?
Angry beings in a revolving cage
With no sense of passion or love.

AMERICAN SOLDIER


Its not a priest that gives us our freedom of religion
And its not a reporter that gives us our freedom of voice.
Its not any judge, lawyer, politician, or teacher
But the blood of a soldier that has sacrificed by choice.


MYSTICAL JOURNEY


After death who will miss us
When to heaven we have gone?
Will family cry our name in tears
As in their hearts we live on?


WAR


When war breaks out, boundaries change
And all who die are a token
Of the rage that must run it's course
Before words of peace are spoken.


LOVE


Love indeed, descends from heaven
Like a shooting star across the sky.
Love sometimes stirs the dust
Till tears fall free from the eye.

FAME


Those who wish to be, not forgotten
Just days after they're dead and gone
Must write such things worth remembering
Or commit acts, worth passing on.


ROSES


The poet Horace once expressed
That roses were worth more than grain
Seed fills a hungry man's stomach
Where roses feed his heart and brain.


SEPTEMBER 11th


We shall seek them out wherever they may hide
Street by street, house-by-house, cave by cave.
They will be eradicated from the face of the earth
By the righteous, the loyal and the brave.


THE SEED OF LOVE


The Lord planted love within mankind's heart
Though things can grow sour when from” Him” we depart.
Love and hate are but two sides of life's golden coin
So be ready for both no matter whom you join.


CONSCIENCE


Our conscience makes us righteous
It's a whisper of god in man.
For without it we're mere puppets
Who dance to the devil's hand.


SORROW


Sorrow is better than laughter
For by grieving, we're improved.
Blessed be all who morn
Till from sadness they're removed


OUR FLAG


Wars were waged where brave men died
As patriots fought side by side.
Our flag is still the pearl of earth
Because of those who prove her worth.


TROUBLES


Mankind is born from a woman’s womb
With a short life that's full of trouble.
Faith is our refuge in times of woe
For without it our troubles double.


FRIENDSHIP


Better is a good friend in the house next door
Than brothers and sisters who are far away.
The spirit of man needs the help of its friends
To face all the problems of each fleeting day.


WISDOM AND KNOWLEDGE


The wise listen to increase their learning
Where the scorners of wisdom close their mind.
The hearts of the prudent gather knowledge
For a soul without grace becomes confined.


By Conservative Poet &
Soldier For The Lord
Tom Zart
Most Published Poet
On The Web

And Most of All Your Friend Tom”

Tom’s Book
Shepherds of Life
410 Poems
Can Be Downloaded At =

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Thats Of All

moon move

on the clouds

with out walk

with out run..

with out fun...

with move

with night

at earth round....

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Wishing It Was

Beauty and grace is what touches me most
Good times can put me in fear
I always feel safe when things are bad
so i cannot let you come near
it seems that i thrive on the dark side of things
I always feel alive when the death bell rings
now you come and bring out the tears in me.
Chorus: Pain never makes me cry, but happiness does,
it's so strange to watch your life walk by
wishing it was
wishing it was more like a fantasy, where everyday surprizes me.
whishing it was.
wo, oh, oh, wishing it was (x 2)
This feeling won't last cause i cannot survive
i tell you i've been here before
when it's moving this fast, it's a matter of time
one of us walks out that door
it seems that i thrive on the dark side of things
I always feel alive when the death bell rings
now you come and bring out the tears in me.
Chorus
Give this some thought
and i'm sure you will know
This is the way it must be
Emotions will rise, emotions will flow,
you bring out the tears in me.
Chorus

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Wishing It Was

Beauty and grace is what touches me most
Good time can put me in fear
Always feel safe when things are bad
So I cannot let you come near
It seems that I thrive on the dark side of things
I always feel alive when the death bell rings
Now you have come and bring out the tears in me
Pain never makes me cry but happiness does
Its so strange to watch my life go by
Wishing it was
Wishing it was more like a fantasy
Where everyone surprises me
Wishing it was
This feeling wont last cause I cannot survive
I tell you Ive been here before
When its movin this fast
Its a matter of time
One of us walks out that door
It seems that I thrive on the dark side of things
I always feel alive when the death bell rings
Now you come and you bring out the tears in me
Give this some thought
And Im sure you will know
This is the way it must be
Emotions will rise emotions will flow
You bring out the tears in me
Its so strange to watch your life walk and where everyday
Ive been burning the candle at both ends
And lied the truth I cant pretend
This is why I will not stay baby
Just like that Im on my way

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Claim True Beauty

It forced her to claim true beauty
Natural one that had come her from almighty
She banged gently her head with hand
“Oh, What I did after all to claim friends”?

It is true peace in mind
At last you will find
The color you choose may reflect
Your desire coupled with noble act

What is there to look so attractive?
Cosmetic application to strive
Hide the real one and claim outer shine
That may not look after all very fine

But what a magic in this ordinary get up?
All dull colors are down not to show up
Simple shine with no more forced smile
Invitation to go along and walk for mile

No words can really explain
All acts are woven in chain
What does she speak and for what?
No answer is ever expected or sought

No flowers can claim importance?
They come up in natural environment at once
Human eyes may stare at to seek peace
Wait for appropriate time to come and release

That is all we live for and mean
Head to rest on solder and lean
Leaving behind all the worries
And final resolve to move and carry

There is so much to speak for color
White may stand for peace and not war
No other color may suit shining face
As goal is achieved in meaningful race

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Paster Steve Dighton = Soldier For The Lord

I'm a soldier for the Lord
Who's been up and who's been down
Though while on the battlefield
I have never turned around.

I face more than flesh and blood
With the devil's evil hoard.
But they shall not steal my soul
For I swing my Lord's swift sword.

I wear all of God's armor
With helmet, breastplate and shield.
As Satan's arrows fly by
From his archers of the field.

The devil casts his dark net
Over any he may charm.
He'll lead them from salvation
With his hands upon their arm.

I battle evil daily
And I pray that you'll join me.
We're not alone in this world
For we're loved and watched by Thee.

HEAVEN'S HEROES

Winning souls tend to change everything
Including who and what we are.
When our darkness within transforms to light
And our eyes have the luster of a star.

We must always pray for the lost among us
Who eagerly race toward the wrong direction.
So they may know their own repentance
Blessed by God's, grace, love and protection.

All of Heaven's heroes have suffered remorse
From hate, fear, lust, loneliness and war.
They do what they do with deliverance of heart
Defeating the dark side of life and more.

Noah found safety within the beams of his ark
To endure Heaven's cleansing of earth.
Moses the deliverer, climbed a mountain
Descending with God's guidelines of worth.

David the shepherd, a boy among men
Slew evil's giant with a flying stone.
Samson the strong man broke from his chains
Toppling the temple with God's help alone.

Jonah was swallowed by a monster fish
To be cast up on shore with a prophecy to tell.
Jesus of Nazareth was nailed to the cross
And without His forgiveness we're doomed to fail.

Lord I'll feel blessed to greet all your heroes
When it is my time to escape my woes.
I'll clutch their hands and kiss their face
As we celebrate the journey we chose.

FAITH

So perfect is nature, though not by man
It's the brush of our Master that paints the land.
The sun comes up and sun goes down
As in every direction God's wonders are found.

The tide comes in and the tide goes out
Our faith in eternalness is what life is about.
Contentment depends on which path we walk
By daylight or darkness; our faith is our rock.

Our confidence and trust in a higher power
Helps guide us through every moment and hour.
Fidelity to one's promise and observance of law
Lets our Lord know we heed His call.

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You Love The Thunder

When you look over your shoulder
And you see the life that youve left behind
When you think it over do you ever wonder?
What it is that holds your life so close to mine
You love the thunder and you love the rain
What you see revealed within the anger is worth the pain
And before the lightning fades and you surrender
Youve got a second to look at the dark side of the man
You love the thunder and you love the rain
You know your hunger like you know your name
And I know you wonder how you ever came
To be a woman in love with a man in search of the flame
Draw the shade and light the fire
For the night that holds you and calls your name
And just like your lover, knows your desire
And the crazy longing that time will never tame
You love the thunder and you love the rain
You know your hunger like you know your name
I got your number if its still the same
You can dream
But you can never go back the way you came

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Herman Melville

Misgivings

When ocean-clouds over inland hills
Sweep storming in late autumn brown,
And horror the sodden valley fills,
And the spire falls crashing in the town,
I muse upon my country's ills--
The tempest burning from the waste of Time
On the world's fairest hope linked with man's foulest crime.

Nature's dark side is heeded now--
(Ah! optimist-cheer dishartened flown)--
A child may read the moody brow
Of yon black mountain lone.
With shouts the torrents down the gorges go,
And storms are formed behind the storms we feel:
The hemlock shakes in the rafter, the oak in the driving keel.

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Nothing Is Real

2 2 2 ICE
yeah 1 2 1 2 mic check uh
death and destruction
weak rhymes and hard crimes
tech nines and lost time to find my
know what it's like to world fight
and white lies
dark side with no sides
the very light
to decide what lies inside the eyes
terrorize despite the pain surprise
i wont front you know i wont hide
why? its fright night worldwide
CHORUS
it's coming its coming 4x
nothing is real
cant do what u feel
nothing feels right
cant save my life
steady rise and rise to the other side
predefined and unified its redefined
love or hate complicate when we all die
dont lose sight of the struggles that i have inside
find out the reason why the people ask why
they see the light i'm going out each and every time
now clear the path i feel the wrath now I'm free
get from in front of me
CHORUS
you cant make me die
now i testify
through you i can see
get from in front of me
you cant make me die
now i'm detrified
through you i can see
get from in front of me
NOW!!!
CHORUS
CHORUS
nothing is real
cant do what u feel
nothing feels right
cant save my life
nothing is real 4x

song performed by Vanilla IceReport problemRelated quotes
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Nothing Is Real

2 2 2 ICE
yeah 1 2 1 2 mic check uh
death and destruction
weak rhymes and hard crimes
tech nines and lost time to find my
know what it's like to world fight
and white lies
dark side with no sides
the very light
to decide what lies inside the eyes
terrorize despite the pain surprise
i wont front you know i wont hide
why? its fright night worldwide
CHORUS
it's coming its coming 4x
nothing is real
cant do what u feel
nothing feels right
cant save my life
steady rise and rise to the other side
predefined and unified its redefined
love or hate complicate when we all die
dont lose sight of the struggles that i have inside
find out the reason why the people ask why
they see the light i'm going out each and every time
now clear the path i feel the wrath now I'm free
get from in front of me
CHORUS
you cant make me die
now i testify
through you i can see
get from in front of me
you cant make me die
now i'm detrified
through you i can see
get from in front of me
NOW!!!
CHORUS
CHORUS
nothing is real
cant do what u feel
nothing feels right
cant save my life
nothing is real 4x

song performed by Vanilla IceReport problemRelated quotes
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Thomas Hardy

A Meeting With Despair

AS evening shaped I found me on a moor
Which sight could scarce sustain:
The black lean land, of featureless contour,
Was like a tract in pain.

"This scene, like my own life," I said, "is one
Where many glooms abide;
Toned by its fortune to a deadly dun--
Lightless on every side.

I glanced aloft and halted, pleasure-caught
To see the contrast there:
The ray-lit clouds gleamed glory; and I thought,
"There's solace everywhere!"

Then bitter self-reproaches as I stood
I dealt me silently
As one perverse--misrepresenting Good
In graceless mutiny.

Against the horizon's dim-descernèd wheel
A form rose, strange of mould:
That he was hideous, hopeless, I could feel
Rather than could behold.

"'Tis a dead spot, where even the light lies spent
To darkness!" croaked the Thing.
"Not if you look aloft!" said I, intent
On my new reasoning.

"Yea--but await awhile!" he cried. "Ho-ho!--
Look now aloft and see!"
I looked. There, too, sat night: Heaven's radiant show
Had gone. Then chuckled he.

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Some call it accidents, but I call it torments

Some call it accidents,
but I call it torments
which usually occurred
when the boys didn’t listen
or acted on their own initiative

and the two boys
while growing up
knew how to do
it to themselves
and then to me
and their shocked mother in turn.

Driving slam into a house wall
at full speed on a bicycle
without braking
almost cracked the skull
of one of them
and I had to rush
him to the hospital,
where he got it cleaned,
some injections and stitches.

Ramping a bicycle
into the swimming pool
and almost breaking a neck
while bumping a head
against the side of the pool
had me patching a head wound.

Against instructions going to the river
and walking on pipes,
falling in
and almost drowning
while breaking a leg
had me rush him to the nearest doctor.

Petting a squirrel
which looked tame as a house cat
while visiting the Kruger national park
almost gave him rabies,
nearly severed his finger
and luckily there was a clinic nearby
where they helped
while dosing out a big scolding
to both the child and us.

Removing the fall mats
around the trampoline
at a resort
and landing
on the concrete next to it,
gashed the boy’s head
with a deep cut
which happened on a Sunday

and when I found
the house of the only doctor there
I had to drive to the local airport
and ask the tower
to call him down
where his was flying
his own plane
and he stopped the bleeding,
administered injections,
applied stitches,
prescribed some pain killers
and gave one hell
of a big bill.

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