Latest quotes | Random quotes | Vote! | Latest comments | Add quote

The Kingfisher

Sitting still on the overhanging branch
this beautiful creation of bright colours.
Vivid Blue with a flash of Orange,
what a spectacular bird you are.
Then a quick lightening dive
coming back with little fish
what a terrific hunter you are.
Proudly you sit on your branch
brightening up the drabness
what a colourful bird you are.
Your such a wonderous sight
small but big on style
what a super bird you are!

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Related quotes

Sitting Still

This name I got we all agreed
See could stop stop it will rid
We could bind it in the cist
We could gather, throw a fit
Up to buy, katie buys a kitchen-size, but not mae ann
Setting trap for love, making a waste of time, sitting still
Im the sign and you can read.
Im the sign and youre not deaf.
We could bind it in the cist.
We could gather, throw a fit.
Up to buy, katie buys a kitchen-size, but not mae ann
Setting trap for love, making a waste of time, sitting still
I can hear you. I can hear you. I can hear you.
This name I got we all agree
See could stop stop it will rid
We could bind it in the cist
We could gather, throw a fit.
Up to buy, katie buys a kitchen-size, but not mae ann
Setting trap for love, making a waste of time, sitting still
I can hear you. I can hear you. I can hear you.
You can gather when I talk, talk until youre blue
You could get away from me. get away from me.
Up to buy, katie buys a kitchen-size, but not me
Setting trap for love, making a waste of time, sitting still
I can hear you. I can hear you. I can hear you.
I can hear you. I can hear you. I can hear you.
Can you hear me?

song performed by REMReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

When I Think of You

Fireflies freely roam
Around these verdant trees
They always bring me home
Thoughts beautiful as these.

Moonbeams and soft lights
With little cricket sounds
And coolness of the night
Like Love you give surrounds.

And when I think of you
There's flight to your embrace
Dreamed happiness comes true
My lips have touched your face.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

In The Still Of The Night

In the still of the night
As I gaze out of my window
At the moon in its flight
My thoughts all stray, stray to you
In the still of the night
While the world lies in slumber
Oh the times without number
When I say to you
Do you love me
Just like I love you
Are you my life to be
That dream come true
Or will this dream of mine
Will it fade way out of sight
Just like that moon growing dim
Way out on the rim of the hill
In the still of the night

song performed by Ella FitzgeraldReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

To Still Have The Courage

to still have the courage
to go on living
despite
all the odds of a life
that seems
to refuse life's
limited offers
of survival

to dream of you
and still keep on dreaming
of you
when reality
on the other hand
flatly tells
that you were gone
that in fact
you were gone
23 years ago

i wake up
only to find out that
life is cruel
and insensitive

courage tells
to go on
living life
both as a duty
and a right
that life is beautiful
that courage
is indefatigable

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Ive Still Got The Love We Made

(michael garvin, chris waters, tom shapiro)
You know I cant find the letters you wrote to me in school.
And that shoebox full of photographs got lost in my last move.
I gave away that old twin bed where you and I first laid.
But after all this time, Ive still got the love we made.
And that old beat up car we dated in, finally turned
To rust. and the first rose that you gave me, oh it finally turned to
Dust. but all those tender nights we shared are never gonna fade.
Cause after all this time Ive still got the love we made.
Ive got every feeling we felt when touched.
Cause even though fell apart I kept a part of us. Ive held
On to everytime we held each other tight, and promised that no matter
What wed never say goodbye. I dont have one souvenier
Of us Id meant to save, but right here in my heart
Ive still got the love we made.
Ooh right here in my heart
Ive still got the love we made.

song performed by Reba McentireReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

I Still Have The Dream

Michael w. smith/ raymond a. boyd/ kevin jonas
Dont you ever forget that he has given us a future and a hope.
Said its sad, said it was a shame
Bet you thought I caught a boat to bombay
On the line just to let you know
I will be around
Underneath the bridge to nowhere
Like Im livin out a game of solitaire
Goin up to a better day
I will be around
Hey world, its me
I still have the heart, still have the dream
Come on, people
Weve got to come together
Its you and me
Hope will make us stronger
Freedom it rings
Do you hear it calling
Reach out and touch
And love will take us higher
Somebody threw a brick at my vision
Tried to sabotage my mission
Either way, I believe
I will be around
I wanna know, people are you with me
Open up your heart and just believe
Take a step, let me hear you say
I will be around
Hey world, its me
I still have the heart, still have the dream
For he knows the plans he has for you
A plan to prosper and not to harm you
To give you a future, and a hope

song performed by Michael W. SmithReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

I sho hates the Devil (but God, you gots ta shape up too

I know the devil’s the bad dude, and you’re sposed to be good and all that
But big guy, let me tell you, I jes don’t think you know where it’s at
A lotta things they need affixing and that’s a pure and simple fact
Howsa about getting your holy arse a stirrin and perform some miraculous act

Big guy, they’s a lotta problems and they’s more seems to be growin each day
So why aintcha out there affixing ‘em, in this big guy, miraculous way
Why, hells bells, you made the earth and I’m a guessing likely the cosmos too
So why do ya let public restrooms, smell like some ‘ol gol-danged zoo

Big guy you a real puzzle. I’ma thinking you just might could be lazy
Lettin women get raped and kids starve sure seems crazy
Seems like you alookin tother way, seems like you surely do
Yeah, I hates the devil, but God you gotta shape up too

And hows about foot fungus, arthritis and my achin back
Big guy, sho nuff, atimes I’ma thinking you just don know jack
messy ’ol airplane crashes, way big ‘ol floods an such
Hell, I’d point that religious finger and stop ‘em with that righteous touch

I know you run this big ‘ol kingdom, up in that big ‘ol sky
So howsa about a big ‘ol miracle for that little ‘ol kid starving in Mombai
Don wanna sound disrespectful lord, hopin you knowin that’s true
Sho nuff I hates the Devil, but God you really, really, gotta shape up too

And don you be layin no plagues on me now. I’m jus tryin to getcha offa your duff
Big guy, you sho done lotsa miracles,
but right now you jes ain doin enuf

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

We're Still Here The Humans Have Died

The animals on Earth have decided to meet,
Almost every life form will have a seat,
The Human Race have not been invited,
The reason is we have been indicted.

For mass destruction you stand accused,
The world's resources you have abused,
It has to be said at all others expense,
For neglect of duty there is no defence.

Rainforests decimated, oceans polluted,
All over the planet your destruction's commuted,
In the name of God you continue to destroy,
That '' superior'' intelligence you refuse to deploy.

As the planet warms extinctions grow faster,
You refuse to believe because you are the master,
Master of destruction should be your title,
Vast wealth over health to you is more vital.

While you hunted for diamonds and precious metals,
You failed to notice all the dying petals,
Due to greed and corruption there is nothing left,
Of common sense you are all bereft.

As the food ran out your minds were elsewhere,
So long as you were rich you just didn't care,
The water evaporated until there was none,
Caused by your negligence and the warming sun.

Then came the day you all started to cry,
Our planets oil had finally run dry,
Suddenly humankind had run out of hope,
Without their black gold they could no longer cope.

Their lives were in turmoil so they started to fight,
Although killing each other will never be right,
We just sat back and watched the destruction,
You're all fully versed in causing a ruction.

After a nuclear holocaust the fighting ended,
With you all gone now the Earth could be mended,
Extinctions are now a thing of the past,
Your cruelty and neglect left us all aghast.

We did you no harm yet it's us you deprived,
If you'd heeded the warnings all life could have thrived,
But our summit is over we've been vilified,

‘' We're still Here The Humans Have Died ‘'

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share
Homer

The Odyssey: Book 16

Meanwhile Ulysses and the swineherd had lit a fire in the hut and
were were getting breakfast ready at daybreak for they had sent the
men out with the pigs. When Telemachus came up, the dogs did not bark,
but fawned upon him, so Ulysses, hearing the sound of feet and
noticing that the dogs did not bark, said to Eumaeus:
"Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one of
your acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him and
not barking."
The words were hardly out of his mouth before his son stood at the
door. Eumaeus sprang to his feet, and the bowls in which he was mixing
wine fell from his hands, as he made towards his master. He kissed his
head and both his beautiful eyes, and wept for joy. A father could not
be more delighted at the return of an only son, the child of his old
age, after ten years' absence in a foreign country and after having
gone through much hardship. He embraced him, kissed him all over as
though he had come back from the dead, and spoke fondly to him saying:
"So you are come, Telemachus, light of my eyes that you are. When
I heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see you
any more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a good
look at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come into
the country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the town
generally. I suppose you think it better to keep an eye on what the
suitors are doing."
"So be it, old friend," answered Telemachus, "but I am come now
because I want to see you, and to learn whether my mother is still
at her old home or whether some one else has married her, so that
the bed of Ulysses is without bedding and covered with cobwebs."
"She is still at the house," replied Eumaeus, "grieving and breaking
her heart, and doing nothing but weep, both night and day
continually."
As spoke he took Telemachus' spear, whereon he crossed the stone
threshold and came inside. Ulysses rose from his seat to give him
place as he entered, but Telemachus checked him; "Sit down, stranger."
said he, "I can easily find another seat, and there is one here who
will lay it for me."
Ulysses went back to his own place, and Eumaeus strewed some green
brushwood on the floor and threw a sheepskin on top of it for
Telemachus to sit upon. Then the swineherd brought them platters of
cold meat, the remains from what they had eaten the day before, and he
filled the bread baskets with bread as fast as he could. He mixed wine
also in bowls of ivy-wood, and took his seat facing Ulysses. Then they
laid their hands on the good things that were before them, and as soon
as they had had enough to eat and drink Telemachus said to Eumaeus,
"Old friend, where does this stranger come from? How did his crew
bring him to Ithaca, and who were they?-for assuredly he did not
come here by land"'
To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tell
you the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been a
great traveller. At this moment he is running away from a
Thesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him into
your hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he is
your suppliant."
"I am very much distressed," said Telemachus, "by what you have just
told me. How can I take this stranger into my house? I am as yet
young, and am not strong enough to hold my own if any man attacks
me. My mother cannot make up her mind whether to stay where she is and
look after the house out of respect for public opinion and the
memory of her husband, or whether the time is now come for her to take
the best man of those who are wooing her, and the one who will make
her the most advantageous offer; still, as the stranger has come to
your station I will find him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with a
sword and sandals, and will send him wherever he wants to go. Or if
you like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send him
clothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men;
but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are very
insolent, and are sure to ill-treat him in a way that would greatly
grieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothing
against numbers, for they will be too strong for him."
Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say something
myself. I am much shocked about what you have said about the
insolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such a
man as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, or
has some god set your people against you? May you not complain of your
brothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,
however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you are
and in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,
Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, but
I would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.
If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would rather
die fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights day
after day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the women
servants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,
and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never be
accomplished."
And Telemachus answered, "I will tell you truly everything. There is
no emnity between me and my people, nor can I complain of brothers, to
whom a man may look for support however great his quarrel may be. Jove
has made us a race of only sons. Laertes was the only son of
Arceisius, and Ulysses only son of Laertes. I am myself the only son
of Ulysses who left me behind him when he went away, so that I have
never been of any use to him. Hence it comes that my house is in the
hands of numberless marauders; for the chiefs from all the
neighbouring islands, Dulichium, Same, Zacynthus, as also all the
principal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under the
pretext of paying court to my mother, who will neither say point blank
that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end, so they
are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so with
myself into the bargain. The issue, however, rests with heaven. But do
you, old friend Eumaeus, go at once and tell Penelope that I am safe
and have returned from Pylos. Tell it to herself alone, and then
come back here without letting any one else know, for there are many
who are plotting mischief against me."
"I understand and heed you," replied Eumaeus; "you need instruct
me no further, only I am going that way say whether I had not better
let poor Laertes know that you are returned. He used to superintend
the work on his farm in spite of his bitter sorrow about Ulysses,
and he would eat and drink at will along with his servants; but they
tell me that from the day on which you set out for Pylos he has
neither eaten nor drunk as he ought to do, nor does he look after
his farm, but sits weeping and wasting the flesh from off his bones."
"More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, but
we must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everything
their own way, the first thing I should choose would be the return
of my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste back
again, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my mother
to send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let him
hear it from her."
Thus did he urge the swineherd; Eumaeus, therefore, took his
sandals, bound them to his feet, and started for the town. Minerva
watched him well off the station, and then came up to it in the form
of a woman- fair, stately, and wise. She stood against the side of the
entry, and revealed herself to Ulysses, but Telemachus could not see
her, and knew not that she was there, for the gods do not let
themselves be seen by everybody. Ulysses saw her, and so did the dogs,
for they did not bark, but went scared and whining off to the other
side of the yards. She nodded her head and motioned to Ulysses with
her eyebrows; whereon he left the hut and stood before her outside the
main wall of the yards. Then she said to him:
"Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, it is now time for you to tell
your son: do not keep him in the dark any longer, but lay your plans
for the destruction of the suitors, and then make for the town. I will
not be long in joining you, for I too am eager for the fray."
As she spoke she touched him with her golden wand. First she threw a
fair clean shirt and cloak about his shoulders; then she made him
younger and of more imposing presence; she gave him back his colour,
filled out his cheeks, and let his beard become dark again. Then she
went away and Ulysses came back inside the hut. His son was
astounded when he saw him, and turned his eyes away for fear he
might be looking upon a god.
"Stranger," said he, "how suddenly you have changed from what you
were a moment or two ago. You are dressed differently and your
colour is not the same. Are you some one or other of the gods that
live in heaven? If so, be propitious to me till I can make you due
sacrifice and offerings of wrought gold. Have mercy upon me."
And Ulysses said, "I am no god, why should you take me for one? I am
your father, on whose account you grieve and suffer so much at the
hands of lawless men."
As he spoke he kissed his son, and a tear fell from his cheek on
to the ground, for he had restrained all tears till now. but
Telemachus could not yet believe that it was his father, and said:
"You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vain
hopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could of
himself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself old
and young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him. A second
ago you were old and all in rags, and now you are like some god come
down from heaven."
Ulysses answered, "Telemachus, you ought not to be so immeasurably
astonished at my being really here. There is no other Ulysses who will
come hereafter. Such as I am, it is I, who after long wandering and
much hardship have got home in the twentieth year to my own country.
What you wonder at is the work of the redoubtable goddess Minerva, who
does with me whatever she will, for she can do what she pleases. At
one moment she makes me like a beggar, and the next I am a young man
with good clothes on my back; it is an easy matter for the gods who
live in heaven to make any man look either rich or poor."
As he spoke he sat down, and Telemachus threw his arms about his
father and wept. They were both so much moved that they cried aloud
like eagles or vultures with crooked talons that have been robbed of
their half fledged young by peasants. Thus piteously did they weep,
and the sun would have gone down upon their mourning if Telemachus had
not suddenly said, "In what ship, my dear father, did your crew
bring you to Ithaca? Of what nation did they declare themselves to be-
for you cannot have come by land?"
"I will tell you the truth, my son," replied Ulysses. "It was the
Phaeacians who brought me here. They are great sailors, and are in the
habit of giving escorts to any one who reaches their coasts. They took
me over the sea while I was fast asleep, and landed me in Ithaca,
after giving me many presents in bronze, gold, and raiment. These
things by heaven's mercy are lying concealed in a cave, and I am now
come here on the suggestion of Minerva that we may consult about
killing our enemies. First, therefore, give me a list of the
suitors, with their number, that I may learn who, and how many, they
are. I can then turn the matter over in my mind, and see whether we
two can fight the whole body of them ourselves, or whether we must
find others to help us."
To this Telemachus answered, "Father, I have always heard of your
renown both in the field and in council, but the task you talk of is a
very great one: I am awed at the mere thought of it; two men cannot
stand against many and brave ones. There are not ten suitors only, nor
twice ten, but ten many times over; you shall learn their number at
once. There are fifty-two chosen youths from Dulichium, and they
have six servants; from Same there are twenty-four; twenty young
Achaeans from Zacynthus, and twelve from Ithaca itself, all of them
well born. They have with them a servant Medon, a bard, and two men
who can carve at table. If we face such numbers as this, you may
have bitter cause to rue your coming, and your revenge. See whether
you cannot think of some one who would be willing to come and help
us."
"Listen to me," replied Ulysses, "and think whether Minerva and
her father Jove may seem sufficient, or whether I am to try and find
some one else as well."
"Those whom you have named," answered Telemachus, "are a couple of
good allies, for though they dwell high up among the clouds they
have power over both gods and men."
"These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,
when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, return
home early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors as
before. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguised
as a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel your
heart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremost
out of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyond
gently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will not
listen to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.
Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shall
put it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do this
you must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it in
the strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why
you are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the way
of the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses
went away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this
more particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to
quarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harm
which may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms
sometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spear
apiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we can
snatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quiet
these people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my son
and my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses is
within the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any of
the servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit the
women alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the men
servants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."
"Father," replied Telemachus, "you will come to know me by and by,
and when you do you will find that I can keep your counsel. I do not
think, however, the plan you propose will turn out well for either
of us. Think it over. It will take us a long time to go the round of
the farms and exploit the men, and all the time the suitors will be
wasting your estate with impunity and without compunction. Prove the
women by all means, to see who are disloyal and who guiltless, but I
am not in favour of going round and trying the men. We can attend to
that later on, if you really have some sign from Jove that he will
support you."
Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had brought
Telemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.
When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to the
land; their servants came and took their armour from them, and they
left all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent a
servant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,
but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmed
and made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet when
they were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When they
reached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in the
presence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returned
from Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privately
that her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given his
message he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to his
pigs again.
The suitors were surprised and angry at what had happened, so they
went outside the great wall that ran round the outer court, and held a
council near the main entrance. Eurymachus, son of Polybus, was the
first to speak.
"My friends," said he, "this voyage of Telemachus's is a very
serious matter; we had made sure that it would come to nothing. Now,
however, let us draw a ship into the water, and get a crew together to
send after the others and tell them to come back as fast as they can."
He had hardly done speaking when Amphinomus turned in his place
and saw the ship inside the harbour, with the crew lowering her sails,
and putting by their oars; so he laughed, and said to the others,
"We need not send them any message, for they are here. Some god must
have told them, or else they saw the ship go by, and could not
overtake her.
On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew the
ship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and they
went up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let any
one old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son of
Eupeithes, spoke first.
"Good heavens," said he, "see how the gods have saved this man
from destruction. We kept a succession of scouts upon the headlands
all day long, and when the sun was down we never went on shore to
sleep, but waited in the ship all night till morning in the hope of
capturing and killing him; but some god has conveyed him home in spite
of us. Let us consider how we can make an end of him. He must not
escape us; our affair is never likely to come off while is alive,
for he is very shrewd, and public feeling is by no means all on our
side. We must make haste before he can call the Achaeans in
assembly; he will lose no time in doing so, for he will be furious
with us, and will tell all the world how we plotted to kill him, but
failed to take him. The people will not like this when they come to
know of it; we must see that they do us no hurt, nor drive us from our
own country into exile. Let us try and lay hold of him either on his
farm away from the town, or on the road hither. Then we can divide
up his property amongst us, and let his mother and the man who marries
her have the house. If this does not please you, and you wish
Telemachus to live on and hold his father's property, then we must not
gather here and eat up his goods in this way, but must make our offers
to Penelope each from his own house, and she can marry the man who
will give the most for her, and whose lot it is to win her."
They all held their peace until Amphinomus rose to speak. He was the
son of Nisus, who was son to king Aretias, and he was foremost among
all the suitors from the wheat-growing and well grassed island of
Dulichium; his conversation, moreover, was more agreeable to
Penelope than that of any of the other for he was a man of good
natural disposition. "My friends," said he, speaking to them plainly
and in all honestly, "I am not in favour of killing Telemachus. It
is a heinous thing to kill one who is of noble blood. Let us first
take counsel of the gods, and if the oracles of Jove advise it, I will
both help to kill him myself, and will urge everyone else to do so;
but if they dissuade us, I would have you hold your hands."
Thus did he speak, and his words pleased them well, so they rose
forthwith and went to the house of Ulysses where they took their
accustomed seats.
Then Penelope resolved that she would show herself to the suitors.
She knew of the plot against Telemachus, for the servant Medon had
overheard their counsels and had told her; she went down therefore
to the court attended by her maidens, and when she reached the suitors
she stood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the
cloister holding a veil before her face, and rebuked Antinous saying:
"Antinous, insolent and wicked schemer, they say you are the best
speaker and counsellor of any man your own age in Ithaca, but you
are nothing of the kind. Madman, why should you try to compass the
death of Telemachus, and take no heed of suppliants, whose witness
is Jove himself? It is not right for you to plot thus against one
another. Do you not remember how your father fled to this house in
fear of the people, who were enraged against him for having gone
with some Taphian pirates and plundered the Thesprotians who were at
peace with us? They wanted to tear him in pieces and eat up everything
he had, but Ulysses stayed their hands although they were
infuriated, and now you devour his property without paying for it, and
break my heart by his wooing his wife and trying to kill his son.
Leave off doing so, and stop the others also."
To this Eurymachus son of Polybus answered, "Take heart, Queen
Penelope daughter of Icarius, and do not trouble yourself about
these matters. The man is not yet born, nor never will be, who shall
lay hands upon your son Telemachus, while I yet live to look upon
the face of the earth. I say- and it shall surely be- that my spear
shall be reddened with his blood; for many a time has Ulysses taken me
on his knees, held wine up to my lips to drink, and put pieces of meat
into my hands. Therefore Telemachus is much the dearest friend I have,
and has nothing to fear from the hands of us suitors. Of course, if
death comes to him from the gods, he cannot escape it." He said this
to quiet her, but in reality he was plotting against Telemachus.
Then Penelope went upstairs again and mourned her husband till
Minerva shed sleep over her eyes. In the evening Eumaeus got back to
Ulysses and his son, who had just sacrificed a young pig of a year old
and were ready; helping one another to get supper ready; Minerva
therefore came up to Ulysses, turned him into an old man with a stroke
of her wand, and clad him in his old clothes again, for fear that
the swineherd might recognize him and not keep the secret, but go
and tell Penelope.
Telemachus was the first to speak. "So you have got back,
Eumaeus," said he. "What is the news of the town? Have the suitors
returned, or are they still waiting over yonder, to take me on my
way home?"
"I did not think of asking about that," replied Eumaeus, "when I was
in the town. I thought I would give my message and come back as soon
as I could. I met a man sent by those who had gone with you to
Pylos, and he was the first to tell the new your mother, but I can say
what I saw with my own eyes; I had just got on to the crest of the
hill of Mercury above the town when I saw a ship coming into harbour
with a number of men in her. They had many shields and spears, and I
thought it was the suitors, but I cannot be sure."
On hearing this Telemachus smiled to his father, but so that Eumaeus
could not see him.
Then, when they had finished their work and the meal was ready, they
ate it, and every man had his full share so that all were satisfied.
As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, they laid down to
rest and enjoyed the boon of sleep.

poem by , translated by Samuel ButlerReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

I Still Find the Roses Red

I still find the roses red
A dozen ones you placed on my bed
A time of long-ago Valentine
When my precious Love was still mine

I still find the roses red
But the meaning lost for the words we said
I thought the rose had a dropp of dew
I found it was a tear I shed... for you.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Aigis

The day of small things and the day of big things,
Like the plume in the hand of Zerubbabel;
But, i am a sower of righteousness in Babylon.

The day of beautiful things and the day of handsome things,
Like a man clothed in linen;
But my hands are towards heaven with love,
And i will love you like the Queen's Valley.

Aigis my love,
Of such luminaries around us;
But do have one voice on this love.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

In The Still Of The Night

In the still of the night
I held you, held you tight
cause I love, love you so
Promise Ill never let you go
In the still of the night
In the still of the night
I remember (I remember) that night in may
The stars (the stars) were bright above
Ill hope and Ill pray
To keep your precious love
Well before the light
Hold me again
With all of your might
In the still of the night
In the still of the night
So before the light
Hold me again with all of your might
In the still of the night
In the still of the night
In the still of the night

song performed by Boyz II MenReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

A Beautiful Creation

It was yesterday,
I cannot walk straight
my body was bended
by too much cold of winter.

It was yesterday
when I worry my future
not knowing where to go
my heart was filled with sorrow.

Then I found
this little sprout in my garden
which, in no more time
will surely become
a beautiful flower
this....
little sprout
I found in my garden.

Oh, little sprout,
you have come just in time
reminding me that,
If I'd be strong to survive
the harsh season of my life
I, in this world, just like you
will also be
a beautiful creation
of the One who created.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Everywhere in the garden flowers grow in bright colours

Everywhere in the garden flowers grow in bright colours
and in this small paradise the last winter wind blows,
when the air is filled with the smell of jasmine and gardenia
and with each other we are without talking somewhat familiar
when the other world of work and worries is reduced,
when we hear doves sing their songs of love,
when the sun like a red ball returns to its resting place,
when sparrows watch us from tree branches
and the evening star and the darkness comes suddenly
but still we are smitten with each other,
with something intimate in each moment
when the moon hangs red brown
and the I find in you a resting place for my heart,
some joy and happiness in a world full of pain and sorrow.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

In The Still Of The Nite

Boyz ii men harmony part:
Sha doop shobe doo (repeats a lot)
In the still of the nite
I held you, held you tight
Oh i love, love you so
Promise i'll never let ya go
In the still of the nite
In the still of the nite
I remember (i remember) that night in bed
Well the stars (the stars) were bright above
I hope and i pray
To keep your precious love
So before the light
Hold me again
With all of your might
In the still of the nite
In the still of the nite
Boyz ii men harmony part:
Shoo wap shoo wa (repeats a lot)
So before the light
Hold me again with all of your might
In the still of the nite
In the still of the nite
In the still of the nite
Boyz ii men harmony part:
Sha doop shobe doo (repeats a lot and fades out)

song performed by Boyz II MenReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

In The Still Of The Night (I'll Remember)

do do do do
shoo doop shooby doo
shoo doop shooby doo
shoo doop shooby doo
shoo doop shooby waa
in the still of the night
i held you
held you tight
oh i love
love you so
promise i'll never
let you go
in the still of the night
in the still of the night
i remember that night in may
when the stars were right up above
i hope and i pray
to keep your precious love
so before the night
hold me again
with all of your might
in the still the night
in the still of the night
shoo doop shooby doo
shoo doop shooby doo
shoo doop shooby doo (repeat)
so before
the night
hold me again
with all of your might
in the still of the night
oooo in the still of the night
in the still of the night
shoo doop shooby doo
shoo doop shooby doo
shoo doop shooby doo (repeat

song performed by Boyz II MenReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Still Falls The Rain

(ferry/manzanera)
Dear hyde -
No more can i
Explain, ive tried
With words in vain
They pass you by
Like falling rain
From perfect skies
Still falls the rain
Inside
Hey brother dont be square
Here it is not over there
Im your man - ive got it made
You need my fire you need my shade
Youre here hyde -
Once more inspire
This strangely tied
Uncertain frame
So torn inside
Still falls the rain
Two minds, one vein
Still falls the rain
Inside
Hey doctor dont be scared
Its you and me so wheres my share?
Im the man just move aside
Call me mister call me hyde
Hey lover dont be shy
Im a single minded guy
Better watch me - boy im rough
Half a man aint strong enough
Hey brother dont be square
Here it is not over there
Im your man - ive got it made
You feed my fire you need my shade

song performed by Roxy MusicReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Still Of The Night

(coverdale/sykes)
In the still of the night
I hear the wolf howl, honey
Sniffing around your door
In the still of the night
I feel my heart beating heavy
Telling me I gotta have more
In the shadow of night
I see the full moon rise
Telling me whats in store,
My heart start aching
My body start a shaking
And I cant take no more, no, no
Now I just wanna get close to you
An taste your love so sweet
And I just wanna make love to you
Feel your body heat...
In the still of the night...
In the still of the night...
Over here baby...
In the heat of the day
I hang my head down low
And hide my face from the sun
Through the light of the day
Until the evening time
Im waiting for the night to come
In the still of the night,
In the cool moonlight,
I feel heart is aching
In the still of the night...
Tell me here baby
In the still of the night
I hear the wolf howl, honey
Sniffing around your door...
In the still of the night
I feel my heart beating heavy
Telling me I gotta have more...
Now I just wanna get close to you
An taste your love so sweet
And I just wanna make love to you
Feel your body heat.
In the still of the night...
Still of the night,
Still of the night,
Still of the night...

song performed by WhitesnakeReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Still Falls The Rain

the rain against the windshield endlessly
for many years i cruised around the world
i've finally disembarked my ship of fools
a hero then, a stranger to return
i'd trade my goldrush 'gainst your silvernets
to know what happened after all this time
and in your arms i'm lost forevermore
i wonder how you ever felt in mine
isn't it strange, i still can hear your call
isn't it strange, i'm not a ghost at all
isn't it strange or is it just insane
isn't it strange, the glory and the fame
still falls the rain..
do you remember how we used to play
and how we waved our banners in the sun
do you remember how we gave ourselves away
for some strange kind of fun
and how we smiled as if we'd understood the writings on the walls
and cooked our spice on silver spoons
and if we wouldn't see the light
we overdosed the foll'wing night
isn't it strange...
i've got burnholes in my fingers that could not ease your pain
or was it me who killed the blue inside your eyes?
when silence grew behind our shadows on the wall
but if all was silent, could we hear a bit more?
i wonder can you hear me now? - isn't it strange
ohhh...
isn't it strange, i still can hear your call
isn't it strange, i'm not a ghost at all
isn't it strange or is it just insane
isn't it strange, the glory and the fame
still falls the rain..

song performed by AlphavilleReport problemRelated quotes
Added by Lucian Velea
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share

Slippery ground

Heavy showers make land surface slippery,
Cautious walk with alertness and worry,
Sudden fall causes injury and makes you sorry,
While Children play in street and make it marry,

We tend to forget soon the impact of ground,
Not heeding to advice even looks sound,
In heavy rain you should avoid drive and round,
Such joy and happiness may always be not found,

Life is such thrilling and so exciting,
Lovely butterflies around make it inviting,
Youngsters go for side track and easy walk,
Wearing rosy smile and romantic talk,

Life is more or less on slippery track,
Relation may grow fast and develop crack,
Easy joy sometimes lands you in trouble,
Love disappears fast as water bubble,

As rain appeals you to go for easy ride,
Romantic mood may appear which no one should hide,
Friends sometimes open up and freely confide,
Beautiful scenes can be pictures and taken in slide,

We may call it love or mere infatuation,
Momentary burst of laughter with little fluctuation,
Serious relations may not develop and out of question,
Going for ride is only for pleasure and not for attraction,

It looks easy and but still very hard way,
Further relations may grow and have its say,
Some relations may also progress and some turn sour,
It may come as rain with more water to pour,

We may tend to caution but definitely slip,
Strong urge may prevent no more fall or skip,
One may go for kill but in turn gets killed,
Finds only sorrows and joy never filled,

Both grounds are same and to be dealt with caution
Whoever comes out of it may not face question
You may feel so as if come out of cage
Certainly it is matter incase of age.

poem by Report problemRelated quotes
Added by Poetry Lover
Comment! | Vote! | Copy!

Share
 

Search


Recent searches | Top searches