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Alain Delon

I do very well three things: my job, stupidities and children.

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Three Things to Remember

three things to remember
black and white are equal
in the eyes of god
created for his penchance
for diversity
though many would beg to differ
the healthy child who fails to laugh
or smile for two days
shows something has gone wrong
with us, not them
that we are the ones to seek
psychiatric care, not them
the air has turned hotter
from our own negligence
not the vengeance of god
the world would end
on the hands of men, not god
he only acts according to necessity

inspired by

Three Things to Remember
A Robin Redbreast in a cage,
Puts all Heaven in a rage.
A skylark wounded on the wing
Doth make a cherub cease to sing.
He who shall hurt the little wren
Shall never be beloved by men.
William Blake

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Three Things That Cannot Be Hidden

allegedly there are three things that cannot be hidden.

the sun
the moon
and the truth

throughout my life i have hidden the truth
about myself and it will still be that way
till i take my last
breath

do not insist in seeing that face of truth
my truth is ugly
and i have seen it from the very first day
that they brought
me here
without my permission

i know you like to see it and perhaps describe the horrible details of its
features
i plea before you
do not lift the cover of my being
you may soon regret that you live in this world having seen
the ugly face of my
truth

do not insist to see my truth
it may be the cause of your untimely death
and the gods may pity you

look at me
i wear a smile but my heart is bleeding
it is inflamed
but never bursting.

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We Complimented Each Other Very Well

You believed in me as I believed in you
We complimented each other so well
When my back was against the wall
You brace me from my fall

In my darkest hour
You were my strength, my power
You gave me courage to keep on pushing through
Despite some thing’s I’ve done
You said that I’m the one
That makes your life whole and complete

We complimented each other very well
We complimented each other and the whole wide world could tell
We complimented each other that I’m shore
We complimented each other and you were the one that I adore

Most people said we belong together
We complimented each other so well
Inseparable and you couldn’t pull us apart
You have a special place in my heart

With you I was never alone
You just call I would be right home
You’d be right there to help me make it through
When we are old and gray
From your side I’d never stray
You have made my life whole and complete

For my love for you will never end
For you were my best friend
No gift as precious I could ever find
For you were so warm, tender, and kind

Your light no more shall I see
But in my heart you’ll always be
The storm is over piece may you lay
For tomorrow for you a brighter day

Go forth my beloved into the light
For now everything will be all right
Dream a better dream for you are in a better place
Come now the dawn I must face

Your memory will linger with me forever
For your sweetness I could forget never
You were there when I needed you most
Now I lift my glass to you to toast
I will miss you each and every hour
For you were my strength and my power

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Three Things

three things
three balls of fire burning and burning
before me

1. sex
2. love
3. power

i cannot grab all
i may burst and burn and burn and burn

i had sex this morning.
and it is not trite.

now i can have power,
and then who knows i may graduate from the bickering of the
parts of my being

who knows i can have you finally in the form
of love,
not, a thing, not a thing, not a thing.

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I Know Very Well How I Got My Name

A child in a curious phase
A man with sullen ways
Oh, I know very well how I got my name
You think you were my first love
You think you were my first love, but youre wrong
You were the only one
Whos come and gone
When thirteen years old
Who dyed his hair gold ?
Oh, I know very well, I dont need to be told
You think you were my first love
You think you were my first love, but youre wrong
You were the only one
Whos come and gone
You were the only one
Whos come and gone

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William Butler Yeats

Three Things

`O cruel Death, give three things back,'
Sang a bone upon the shore;
`A child found all a child can lack,
Whether of pleasure or of rest,
Upon the abundance of my breast':
A bone wave-whitened and dried in the wind.

`Three dear things that women know,'
Sang a bhone upon the shore;
`A man if I but held him so
When my body was alive
Found all the pleasure that life gave':
A bone wave-whitened and dried in the wind.

`The third thing that I think of yet,'
Sang a bone upon the shore,
`Is that morning when I met
Face to face my rightful man
And did after stretch and yawn':
A bone wave-whitened and dried in the wind.

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I Get Along Without You Very Well

(hoagy carmichael)
I get along without you very well
Of course I do
Except when the soft rains fall
And drip from the leaves, then I recall
The thrill of being sheltered in your arms
Of course I do
But I get along without you very well
Ive forgotten you just like I should
Of course I have
Except to hear your name
Or someones laugh that is just the same
But Ive forgotten you just like I should
What a guy
What a fool I am
To think my breaking heart could kid the moon
Whats in store
Should I phone once more
No its best that I stick to my tune
I get along without you very well
Of course I do
Except perhaps in spring
But I should never think of spring
For that would surely break my heart in two

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I Get Along Without You Very Well

Hoagy carmichael
I get along without you very well
Of course, I do
Except when soft rains fall
And drip from leaves
Then I recall
The thrill of being sheltered in your arms
Of course, I do
But I get along without you very well
Ive forgotten you just like I should
Of course, I have
Except to hear your name
Or someones laugh that is the same
But Ive forgotten you just like I should
What a guy
What a fool am i
To think my breaking heart
Could kid the moon
Whats in store
Should I fall once more
No, its best that I stick to my tune
I get along without you very well
Of course, I do
Except perhaps in spring
But I should never think of spring
For that would surely break my heart in two
Whats in store
Should I fall once more
No, its best that I stick to my tune
I get along without you very well
Of course, I do
Except perhaps in spring
But I should never think of spring
For that would surely break my heart in two

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Elegy on Jigar Moradabadi

ELEGY ON JIGAR MORADABADI

INTRODUCTION

Mr. Aziz Ahmad has written an Elegy on the Poet Haji Ali Sikander, commonly known as Jigar Moradabadi. The poem is in 48 stanzas of Eight lines each followed by 48 paragraphs of notes, one for each stanza. They explain the real mood of the stanzas. This is perhaps the first time that an Elegy in English on an Urdu Poet has been attempted. Elegiac poems in Urdu are common. The marsais of Anis and Dabir are long elegiac poems of unsurpassed beauty. An Elegy is literally a song or poem of mourning. The English examples are Lycidas, Adonais and Thyrsis. They are true elegies although Gray's well-known Elegy, which was written in a country churchyard does not mourn anyone in particular and deals with 'the pathos of mortality'.

English Elegies, like Latin Elegies before, were written in a metre called elegiac. Any poem written in that metre was called an Elegy irrespective of the subject matter. Later the point about metre was dropped and any poem was considered an elegy if the subject matter was what I have described, irrespective of the metre. Today the subject and metre must coincide to make a proper elegy.

The metre must be hexameter or pentameter. A hexameter is of six measures the fifth being a dactyl and the sixth either a spondee or a trochee. The other four may be either a dactyls or spondees. An example is Longfellow's Evangeline. Homer's two epic poems and Virgil's Aeneid are in hexameter. Pentameter verse is in two parts, each of which ends with an extra long syllable. The first half consists of two metres, dactyls or spondees, the latter half must be two dactyls.

I have said this because metre-wise this poem in English will not be regarded as a proper Elegy but subject-wise it is. Perhaps Mr. Aziz Ahmad can cast the lines again. *

Subject-wise the poem is excellent. Jigar who wrote of himself:

Jigar main ne chhupaya lakh upna dard o ghum lekin
Bayan kardeen meri surat nay sub kaifiyatein dilki

Was a poet in the front rank in India and in the days when there were Iqbal, Fani and Firaq and several others. Tabassum Nizami has done a great deal to bring his life before us, and his books Daghe Jigar, Shola- e- Toor and Aatishe Gul are poetry which is seldom equaled.

No wonder Mr. Aziz Ahmad's heart bleeds at the very thought of Jigar's death in 1960. Not only has he paid his sincere homage to his memory but he has described the anguish of the family and friends. Jigar would have said:

Meri roodad e ghum who sun rahe hain
Tabassum sa labon par araha hai
Jigar hi ka na ho afsana koi
Daro devar ko hal araha hai.

Mr. Aziz Ahmad's heart-rending verses do make even the doors and walls get into ecstasy!

23rd September,1981 M. Hidayatullah
6, Maulana Azad Road, Vice- President
New Delhi-110011. of India

*AUTHOR'S CLARIFICATION

I append here for ready reference the views of the reputed critics about modern poetry, which are printed on pages 223,224 and 225 of “The Study of Poetry” by A.R. Entwistle.

The reaction against metre in modern poetry is only another symptom of the dissatisfaction with things as they are. The movement towards “free verse” is, of course, no new thing. The experiment of Matthew Arnold, Henley, Walt Whitman and others occur readily to the mind.

Here it is useful to know how the new poetry affected Professor Churton Collins:

“If a man six feet high, of striking masculine beauty and of venerable appearance, chooses to stand on his head in the public streets….. he will at least attract attention, and create some excitement; secondly……..the law of reaction in literature, as in everything else, will assert itself, that when poetry has long attained perfection in form and has been running smoothly in conventional grooves, there is certain to be a revolt both on the part of poets themselves and in the public taste, and the opposite extreme will be affected and welcomed; and thirdly, ……… if a writer has the courage or impudence to set sense, taste, and decency at defiance and, posing sometimes as a mystic and sometimes as a mountebank, to express himself in the jargon of both, and yet has the genius to irradiate his absurdities with flashes of wisdom, beauty, and inspired insight, three things are certain to result, ……… namely, sympathy from those who favor the reaction, disgust on the part of those who belong to neither party, but who are quite willing to judge what they find on its own merits.”

For the frankly modernist view we turn to Mr. Robert Graves, who says:

“Poetry has, in a word, begun to 'go round the corner'; the straight street in which English bards have for centuries walked is no longer so attractive, now that a concealed turning has been found opening up a new street or network of streets whose existence tradition hardly suspected. Traditionalists will even say of the adventures: ' They have completely disappeared; they are walking in the suburbs of poetry called alternatively Nonsense or Madness.' But it disturbs these traditionalists that the defections from the highway are numerous, and that the poets concerned cannot be accused of ignorance of the old ways, of mental unbalance in other departments of life, or in insincerity.”

The spirit of the present generation is in marked degree anti-traditional, and it would easy, but tiresome, to show by copious quotations how welcome the spirit of revolt has become.

Similar tendency is found in modern Urdu Poetry. We should see, what Akbar Allahbadi says in connection.

Qaedon men husne mani gum karo
Sher main kehta hoon hijje tum karo

(Lose in rules beauty of meanings;
Verse I compose, you do spellings.)

Since this elegy consists of a mixture of a Urdu and English words, it is practically impossible to confine it to the conventional English metre.

Aziz Ahmad

FOREWORD

I have with interest gone through the Elegy on the death of the late Haji Ali Sikander, Jigar Moradabadi, presented to me for my comments by Mr. Aziz Ahmad, the author. I am impressed by his style and art. It shows his deep love for Jigar Moradabadi who was a poet of great genius. It seems that he has a good knowledge of the life and art of Jigar. As he has written in the Preface that no poet has so far written an elegy in English on the death of any Urdu poet is, as far as I know, correct. The endeavour is his own. Some points given in the Elegy have already become widely known, while some others are quite new. When I started reading it, I was so charmed that I could not leave it unfinished. It is a fine piece of literature and fascinates its readers. I appreciate the unity of the poem. The stanzas employed help to bind the parts of the poem together into a single whole, so that it becomes a

“Silver chain of sound
of many links, without a break.”

The choice of words and constructions are commendable. I feel that Mr. Aziz Ahmad make a very good use of rhetorical language. The poem is a rhymed product of the author's imagination. He has, no doubt, chosen a dignified subject- the death of a great poet, but the distinction lies in the fact that he has beautifully portrayed his life as well as art.

The poem is elaborate in workmanship and is long enough, with orderly development and fine descriptions. The interplay of emotion, reflection and spontaneity are commendable. At the same time he has no want of narrative force. His logical transition from one thought to another is praiseworthy. The description of scenes in the poem presents a clear picture before the eyes of the readers. The author exhibits his real respect fro Jigar and grief over his death.

In my view, the poem is great due to the following grounds: -

There is in the proposition- ' I weep for Jigar Moradabadi………'; the invocations to Jigar's dead mother and the Spirit of poetry etc.; the mourning of the relatives and friends; the procession of the mourners in concrete and abstract form;
The partaking of nature and Super-natural beings in grief; the praise of the distinctive traits of the life and art of Jigar; and the reward that the great poet has found a place in paradise and has become eternal in death. In the end, the note of personal lament shows his deep personal attachment.

While mentioning many good qualities of Jigar Sahib's personality Mr. Aziz Ahmad rightly emphasized in the last two lines of Stanza no.25 that he little bothered for money. Just to endorse his point I would like to relate one incident which vividly remember even today. In June,1947 an All India Mushaira was organized in Shahajan pur, U.P. Although a student of 10th Class, I happened to be one of the organizers of this function. Unfortunately because of extremely bad weather and sudden heavy rains, the Mushaira was a total failure. All was upset. Not a single poet could recite his poems. We lacked funds even to pay the traveling expenses of more than 12 poets who had arrived to participate in Mushaira, including such popular poets as Salam Machli Shahri and Khumar Barabankvi. Jigar Sahib was staying with one of his pupils Mr. Habab Tirmizi. The poets were demanding money and we were worries how to satisfy them. Jigar Sahib apprehended the whole situation. He got up quietly, went to the wall where his Sherwani was hanging, brought out some two hundred rupees and gave us saying, “Give it over to them.”

When in 1955 I met Jigar Sahib in Aligarh and reminded him of this incident, he smiled and pretended as if he did not remember. Many such events can be related which reveal rare moral qualities of his character.

To conclude my comments, I think it appropriate to quote a few lines from the Elegy which I like most.

The following lines remind us of Shelly's Adonais:

Ideals splendid, Desires, Adorations;
Joys blinded with Tears and Winged Persuasions;
In melancholy mood Love and Ties;
Sorrows with her family of Sighs;
With hair unbound and tears their eyes flow,
Came there in form of procession slow,
The slow moving procession might seem
Like pomp of ants in Summer near stream.

Beautiful imagination is presented subtle contrast of the following lines:

Angels waited his life-account to write;
But were dazzled, seeing him in white light.
Who knows not the reason for this light?
His body though dark, his soul was white.
The loveliest personification is found in stanzas no 12 and 13 where

Learning of his death, Wines held a meeting
To condole his death by hard breast-beating.

and where
Some Wines spirited came to his grave;
Their eyes were red, their hearts were brave.

Stanza no 19 testifies to the author's great skill in narration. Pathos is also beautifully given.

It is evident from stanza no.24 that Mr. Aziz Ahmad has been deeply influenced by Robert Frost, a famous American poet.

The superb description is found in stanza no 26 and 27 where Jigar's fondness for playing cards is shown.

In the following lines a fine smile has been used: -

His behavior was like verses laboured,
Every syllable of which is measured.
Respectful with his elders was he,
And with his friend intimate and free.
With his youngers reserved and fatherly,
He treated them kindly and politely.

In stanza no.33 it seems that the author wants to say that Jigar disliked ' Ghazals' composed by ladies; but the idea has been expressed by giving a beautiful definition of 'Ghazal'.

The following lines in stanza no.44 are very befitting: -

Beauty is the base in the lays of Asghar;
But love beautifies the verses of Jigar.

The following lines, though subjective, compel me to appreciate the author: -
Risen above the waves saw I a hand;
All of a sudden, it drew me to land.
It was the hand of Jigar- a rare man
Who is born once in centuries span.

In the following stanza I find a relish of sonnet. It is filled with sincere feelings.

The void so created cannot be filled,
The Hawk of death has the 'Ghazal Bird' killed.
But the time of death is fixed by Him
Who is our Lord without doubt and whim.
The only tribute to him I pay
Is to compose this sorrowful lay.
His features shall in these lines be seen;
If they live, he shall in them be green.

May this endeavour of Mr. Aziz Ahmad be crowned with success and glory! I wish him to give us many more such wonderful poetic pieces.


Dr. Qamar Rais
Reader,
Department of Urdu
University of Delhi

OPINION I

Janab Aziz Ahmad sahib has sent me a copy of an elegy he has composed in the memory of the late lamented Haji Ali Sikandar Jigar, the Doyen of Urdu poets in the Indian sub-continent.

I have gone through this elegy with deep interest and I find that Aziz Sahib loved and admired Jigar Sahib from the core of his heart. He pours out his heart in grief for Jigar whom he considers the zenith of muses. The elegy is a fitting tribute indeed to a person who lived and died for poetry and whose verses shall for ever continue to inspire generations to come.

Some of Aziz Sahib's stanzas are sublime and worth quoting. For instance he speaks from the unexplored depth of his heart when he says: -

For Jigar I weep. And you too weep
With me, for I plunge into the deep
Of pain and sorrow, of grief and tears.
O hapless Hour chosen from all years!
I ask you to rouse your other compeers;
Then together we will weep blood fro tears.
Till future dares forget the past
His name and fame shall ever last.

In stanza no 28 he has painted a true portrait of Jigar. Of such virtues was Jigar made and of such virtues his Ghazals are the outcome. He was noble both in mind and in action.

He was cordial and hospitable most,
And was to his guests a courteous host.
His behaviour was like verses laboured,
Every syllable of which is measured.
Respectful with his elders was he,
And with his friends, intimate and free.
With his youngers, reserved and fatherly,
He treated them kindly and politely.

I am sure that all those who knew and loved Jigar will enjoy the fine quality of the elegy and will realize that Aziz Sahib has for once not taken to poetic exaggeration.

Kunwar Mehender Singh Bedi

OPINION II

Mr. Aziz Ahmad' elegy on Jigar may be unconventional in metre but is wonderful in matter. The poem is the graphic account of the life, character and verse of a great Urdu poet, it has a great imaginative and emotional appeal and is remarkable for fine personification and vivid imagery. It reminds of Shelly's 'Adonais'.

B. K Kansal Ph. D
Chairman HINDU COLLEGE
Dept. of Post-graduate Studies MORADABAD
and Research in English
Banbata Ganj (Near Kamal Talkies) Dated 28th Sept.1981
Moradabad- 244001

PREFACE

The few lines I have put in this little book are nothing but a tribute I am obliged to pay to the memory of the Late Haji Ali Sikandar, Jigar Moradabadi, a relative of mine, to whom I am deeply indebted as the credit of my life's making goes to him.

He was born on 6th April 1890, in Mohalla Lal bagh, Moradabad, U.P., but from the boyhood he left his native city and roamed far and wide to make his life glorious. He was a natural poet of Urdu. If we peep into his life, we find it true that 'a poet is born, not made.'

Asghar Gondwi, a renowned poet of that time, on seeing him, understood full well that he was fated to be great. So, he owned him, guided him and showered his favors on him.

Jigar lived at Gonda, U.P., in the house of his wife, Nasim. Journey had become the part of his life. He reminded mostly out in connection with Mushairas. Whenever he returned home, he wanted us to remain with him. So, I have passed a portion of my life with him and observed him with love and reverence.

I wanted to write something about him in Urdu prose, and to get published some letters and poems written in his own hand, which I have kept safe with me like sacred things.

I started writing it, but by the force of some unknown power, my mind turned to a theme quite novel. In English, as far as I know, nobody has composed an elegy on the death of an Urdu poet. My purpose of writing in this language is that English will be a vehicle to convey my thoughts and outside this country, as English, being an international language, is read and spoken everywhere.

Jigar was acclaimed ' Ghazal King' in his lifetime. He died on September 9,1960 and was laid to rest at Gonda in the lap of his dear country.

He was truly poetic in his habits and disposition, character and conduct, thoughts and feelings, ways and manners, motions and gestures, dressing and clothing, gait and get-up. Moreover he was gifted by Nature with a throat extremely musical. I have poetized my feelings to pay him homage, as, I think, the homage paid to such a great poet should be musical. I hope that his soul will accept it.

When I was staying at Mecca after the performance of 'Haj' in the year 1975, one night I saw him in a dream. During my stay there I had not dreamed of anyone else save him. When I woke up, I felt a sort of restlessness. Then and there, I performed 'Umera' for him.

When he died, I felt a shock of grief. This Elegy is the outlet of the grief I felt then and have concealed so far.

This Elegy contains some points which are quite new, and which the lovers of Jigar Moradabadi are unaware of. Though the Elegy has parts comprising many traits of Jigar, I have tried to make it a unified whole.

I hope that for the lovers of Jigar Moradabadi, this work will be a Souvenir worth keeping.

How far my aims are fulfilled is for the readers to judge!

In the end, I express my thankfulness to Dr. B. K. Kansal, Head of the Department of English, Hindu College, Moradabad, who has been kind to me to give valuable suggestions for this composition.

I am highly grateful to Mr. M. Hidayatullah, Vice- President of India, for his very valuable and illuminating introduction, which throws sufficient light on elegy in English, Urdu and Latin literature, on its matter and metre. His judicial office he has held as the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

I also express gratitude to Dr. Qamar Rais and Kunwar Mehender Singh Bedi whose high praise of the poem gave me great encouragement.

Aziz Ahmad

1

I weep for Jigar Moradabadi- he is dead!
O weep for the poet who has beautifully wed
Love and Wine with verses of new time,
And has achieved a fame so sublime!
Wailing and weeping wets the air.
How so sad is the drum of the ear.
How so sad is the whole atmosphere!
There is none who is not in despair.

2

For Jigar I weep. And you too weep
With me, for I plunge into the deep
Of pain and sorrow, of grief and tears.
O hapless Hour chosen from all years!
I ask you to rouse your other compeers;
Then together we will weep blood fro tears.
Till future dares forget the past
His name and fame shall ever last.

3

Weep, O Spirit of poetry! Weep,
For he has gone for his final sleep.
His body though motion less; his soul's brain
Listens to your weeping with woeful strain.
At his death are sorrowful many more
Thank those who loved his poetry and lore.
As a poet he was great; as a man was he sublime.
He has lived life very fine; he is uneaten by time.

4

Alas! O Noble Mother, Mother great
Who bore a poet full many a trait!
You could not see him gathering fame,
Upraising your position and name.
In your grave you might have felt charm
When he would sing his rhymings warm.
Now he has gone into the gulf of death
From where nobody returns to this earth.

5

Angels bewail him as he is mortified,
And bless his three works to be immortalized.
He could not bear when his Motherland's pride
Was being crushed by the liberticide.
Communal ghosts when raised their heads,
Poison was filled in people's heads
By professional leaders' hired men;
Then sorrowful songs flowed his pen.

6

Ideals splendid, Desires, Adorations;
Joys blinded with Tears and Winged Persuasions;
In melancholy mood Love and Ties;
Sorrows with her family of Sighs;
With hair unbound and tears their eyes flow,
Came there in form of procession slow,
The slow moving procession might seem
Like pomp of ants in Summer near stream.

7

Rooms of his house began lamenting anew.
Their weeping was silent, though heard by a few.
Such mute voices rarely poets hear;
Others remain deaf, they do not care.
They heard the sound of his amorous lay
When he would sing there in wondrous way.
To him they responded with their echo.
Oh! he is dead, leaving them in great woe

8

One day before his death, he slowly murmured,
“A compartment of train for me be reserved
As life's journey has come to an end
And I have to go to Other Land.”
Some kin by him were standing silent;
Their eyes were tearful, their heads were bent.
Grief so much shattered his dear wife,
She lost all the pleasures of life.

9

When his bier was to be taken out,
Every one was weeping without doubt.
Short-lived though is general grief,
His wife's agony was not brief.
Till Nature is on its normal course,
Morning after night will nature force.
But his wife will weep, day and night,
As her dear soul has taken flight.

10

The eyes had since stopped their weeping;
Now came turn of the heart's bleeding.
The air had been filled with grief and sorrow;
People hurriedly made many a row
For the prayer with humble salutation,
They prayed to God for his soul's consolation.
Homage was paid to departed soul;
But Death was unmindful of the dole.

11

With open heart, his grave was ready
To welcome warmly his dead body.
Angels waited his life-account to write;
But were dazzled, seeing him in white light.
Who knows not the reason for this light?
His body though dark, his soul was white.
He, in dewy sleep, took his last fill
Of liquid rest, forgetful of ill.

12

Learning of his death, Wines held a meeting
To condole his death by hard breast-beating.
The meeting was attended by all the Wines
Of various colors, tastes and racial lines.
A resolution was proposed in the meeting,
And it was unanimously passed by standing.
Wines were weeping, as he was the one
Who once loved them more than any one.

13

Some Wines spirited came to his grave;
Their eyes were red, their hearts were brave.
They were the ones he had preferred once,
But later divorced them for nuisance.
They came ashamed and fully disguised;
They were by mourners not recognized.
Once he had been under the charm of wine;
Later, he broke all the bottles of wine.

14

His was not more than a twin will
Which he made known when he was ill.
He told his wife in presence of no other
Thank my mother, he anon called her thither.
“You won't break your bangles in my dole;
You won't give alms for balming my soul.”
His wife a gentle lady, told him anon
That these two conditions would not be undone.

15

A Wish lay suppressed within his heart,
Which remained unfulfilled in the last.
He desired his grave to be dug near
Those of his father and mother dear.
But once his mentor made a prophecy.
Every thing of Jigar, his house would see.
His prophecy strangely came to be true;
The dust of his grave him to Gonda drew.

16

His father, who was in paradise,
Heard the news of his son's demise.
The news proved to be dagger to his soul,
Though he was beyond the reach of the dole.
By angels there was a Naat being recited,
Composed by Jigar, the very Naat invited
God who rapt in listening to the numbers
Allotted Jigar one of heaven's chambers.

17

People were drowned in the ocean of grief;
They could not have time for nay relief.
Angels so warmly received his soul;
While Earth took his body as a whole.
Grave swore his body never to mar;
Angels wished his soul to shine like star.
God judged the situation, and then delivered
His body to Grave, and soul to heaven transferred.

18

First couplet he made, when eight years old,
Father scolded him, when he was told.
He said through he was to be a poet,
He should not poetise so early yet.
His father, an adapt in Marsia singing,
Taught him to sing verses in the beginning.
The art of singing he did well maintain;
Many a poet copied him in vain.

19

A lot to adversities came in his early teens;
After father's death, he had no sustaining means.
Kin were not ready to call him their own,
Save his step-uncle who helped him alone.
Relations condemned him; he was lorn;
Some called him poet, kin laughed in scorn.
No one knew then he would change the weather,
And would have in his cap a fine feather.

20

Compelled by the conditions, he drank wine
That gave impetus to his metres fine.
The more he drank, the more civilized;
Oft in shame he felt demoralized.
His hair was long, his beard neglected,
And by passions he was much affected.
Who can drink so much wine as the poet drank?
He was super-drinker, to be very frank.


21

What a great poet mystic was he
Who chose Jigar, and owned him dearly!
I praise his might, wisdom and insight;
He changed his life by dint of his light.
The plant dear he watered and reared
Grew to his prime and full flowered.
But alas the fruit was never given birth!
His dear is dead; and dead is the hope of mirth!

22

A land was inherited so fertile;
Some incidents sowed it, but not futile.
It was well watered by pure wine,
And was looked after eyes so fine.
There grew a garden of many plants green;
It was charming and worthy to be seen.
Colourful flowers, beautiful and fair,
Shall always lend smell to poetic air.

23

When he became the climax and crown
Of the poetic fame and renown,
A man became of him deadly jealous,
And mixed with his food something poisonous;
When caught, he confessed his crime,
And Jigar forgave him in no time.
Even such men are very very sorry.
What an exemplary character had he!

24

He was once staying with his friend,
And had enough money to spend.
He was, one night, lying on a cot;
A person smelled that he had a lot.
Presuming him asleep, he picked the pocket
Of his hanging Sherwani or his jacket.
He saw him doing this pernicious deed,
But let him go, thinking him in dire need.

25

Forgetting had been his habit since boyhood.
It is although bad, in his case was so good.
It was his habit doing for others good;
And having done it, he forgot it for good.
He recommended daily several men,
He had such wondrous power in his pen.
Who could find such a gentle friend?
He forgot money he would lend.

26

Playing cards was his hobby like rime;
In playing them he did not mind time.
He would play them till late at night
And oft forgot to take his diet.
He felt bitter when he lost his game,
And got irritated, with excuses lame.
Honesty reigned supreme over him,
So chances of win sometimes were dim.

27

His wife disliked his playing cards
With his intimate friends and bards.
How so interesting when she was angry!
And on it with him she did not agree!
He cooled her anger by burning the cards,
And swore he would never play them onwards.
But lo! The cards burnt and cremated
Were again born and animated.

28

He was cordial and hospitable most,
And was to his guests a courteous host.
His behavior was like verses laboured,
Every syllable of which is measured.
Respectful with his elders was he,
And with his friend intimate and free.
With his youngers, reserved and fatherly,
He treated them kindly and politely.

29

He talked often in a roundabout way;
Listeners had to guess point of his say.
He did not know the art of oratory,
He was although in the know of poetry.
Poetry even he could not debate;
He felt it though within, without combat.
The way he advised was very attractive.
Though he is dead, he is subtly instructive.

30

Humility was his noble trait,
What though he was a poet so great.
He was not narrow, nor arrogant at all,
So his was a gradual rise, not a fall.
Oft he would say that he was nothing,
But was an outcome of some blessing.
“Respect even the elders' shoes.”
He said, and did similar dos.

31

Sycophancy did not suit his nature;
Self-respect was his special feature.
He was witty, sensitive and fair;
To talk like him very few men dare.
Ills, our beauty, spoil and mar,
We are drawn from the goal afar.
He sincerely tried to kill
With his songs the germs of ills.

32

No poet ever earned as so much as did he,
For the highest was his royalty and fee.
He gave much money out of his income
To the needy he gladly did welcome.
When at homes currency notes he hid
In pillow, book or tin with a lid.
They were meant to be given to the needy,
And kept hidden from the view of his lady.


33

Ghazal was originally meant conversation
Lover had with his lady in imagination.
But later its definition was amended;
Now the scope of it is wide and extended.
It has a number of beautiful lines;
It has themes in lovely symbols and signs.
Jigar disliked it composed by a lady;
He said strangely, “Ghazal and a lady! ”

34

“The life and soul of Mushaira has flown; ”
The poets who love Jigar say and moan.
He was poet of so great a fame,
People swarmed him on hearing his name.
They came to listen to, from far and wide,
His honey-sweet rhymes; alas he has died!
The way he sang was singularly his own;
Nature had given him such bewitching tone.

35

He love much his country dear,
He did not leave it in greed or fear;
Though many a chance in his favour
In Urdu-loving Pak., India's neighbour.
He loved his country's gardens and bowers;
Thorns he bore, while leaving their flowers.
He was favourite of Indo-Pakistan;
He was moreover commended in Iran.

36

When muse goaded him, he made outlines
Of plants, flowers and the like designs.
From those shot out a natural couplet
Which was the outcome of passions' outlet.
He chose them after making his correction,
And made of them a beautiful creation.
Poems of his are wines of his liver,
We are drunk with the rhymes of Jigar.

37

His love was very pure and without lust,
Lady's-love respect for his was a must.
He gave 'love' many a colourful name;
According to him loving was no game.
He drank love from the cup of lady-love,
Then got communications from above.
Who could think then and who could judge
Such a hard drinker would do Haj?

38

He dipped in the oceans of passions,
And bathed with water of emotions.
He was so rapt in adoring the love,
Often he scaled the firmament above.
He was lost in his imagination,
He had a bliss of reciprocation.
He soared up high in versification
To have a bliss of amalgamation.

39

All the verses Jigar has wrought
Bear the stamp of what he thought.
The poetry he composed is a fine art;
Naturally it goes to the people's heart.
He had a very keen sense of beauty
Whose expression he considered his duty.
He made his critics bend so low
With poetic spells he would throw.

40

He was created by nature as a bard,
His ideas in verses are not so hard.
He did not put art for only art's sake;
He was the ‘Ghazal King’ of special make,
His poetry is made out of his life;
It belongs to life and exists for life.
He has often blended love and beauty
As if they were no separate entity.

41

He was by nature fitfully emotional;
Poems of his are novel, though conventional.
We hear the cries from within his heart;
Moods he garnered into words of art.
Concerned he was mainly with his feelings;
Oft they are filled with spiritual meanings.
He liked sorrow much more than delight
Which he viewed unstable as the night.

42

Such poetic ego he was given by Nature,
Imitation of others did not suit his nature.
As from bees, the bee-queen takes honey,
So he took much from sublime company.
Governed he was not by views of others;
If he liked, he dipped them in his colours.
If we took into his poetic glory,
We find beneath a current of Manglori.

43

On reading his poems, we find it evident,
He was influenced by many an incident.
Monetary lures could not him entice
To cease fire against political vice.
Fact and truth in them heartily we feel,
Which to young poets very much appeal.
This trend in Hasrat was just a start,
But it was Jigar's beating of heart.

44

Till then, most poets had poetized the feelings
Of lovers, their humble bowings and kneelings.
Nut now Jigar translated the feelings
Born in the hearts of the lovers' darlings.
'Loves' of common poets we do not love;
But the 'love' of Jigar who would not love?
Beauty is the base in the lays of Asghar;
But love beautifies the verses of Jigar.

45

We see the sun and shadow of realism
Blending with the dreams of romanticism
In a balanced and fine symmetry
In Jigar's beautiful poetry.
He was a love-poet over and above,
But he did not suffer from the ill of love.
The heart of his 'Love' was kind and cruel;
The role she played was double and dual.

46

He did not view life in a narrow way;
He wove his view-points in many a lay.
He was not afraid of his life's end;
Death he took for the call of his Friend.
For him, it was a meaningless thing;
He was life, so he found death nothing.
He has now reached a place of love
Where he lives life our world's above.

47

Once I was in hot water of life;
Many a hurdle came in my strife.
Risen above the waves saw I a hand;
All of a sudden, it drew me to land.
It was the hand of Jigar- a rare man
Who is born once in centuries span.
The soul of that great man, like a star,
Still guides my life when the hurdles bar.

48

The void so created cannot be filled,
The Hawk of death has the 'Ghazal Bird' killed.
But the time of death is fixed by Him
Who is our Lord without doubt and whim.
The only tribute to him I pay
Is to compose this sorrowful lay.
His features shall in these lines be seen;
If they live, he shall in them be green.

SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES

Stanza 1

I mourn the death of the Reverend Poet, Jigar Moradabadi. Let all of us weep for him who has very beautifully produced couplets after couplets on Love and wine.

In fact, love is the spirit of his poetry. Wine gave him frankness to bring out feelings of his heart, but it could not make him naked in expression. He had a wineful personality from where his poems came out as intoxicants.

Stanza 2

I weep for Jigar Moradabadi. I invoke the sad Hour of his death which has been selected from all the years for this unfortunate event to weep with me. I also ask unlucky Hour to wake up his other companions (i.e. the hours that have passed) . Then we all collectively will weep blood for the poet. So long as the future continues to remember the past, his name and fame as a poet shall be passed on from age to age.

Stanza 3

Spirit of poetry has been invoked in this stanza to weep over the death of the poet whose soul listens to its painfully musical weeping.

He was a man of distinctive qualities. He had a laudable character. He was liked by men of every religion. His nature was so good that sometimes he was liked by those who had no taste for poetry. Time, therefore, cannot spoil his fame.

Stanza 4

Jigar's dead mother is worthy of praise as she gave birth to a poet who had many qualities. But it is regrettable that she had died before he became famous. I imagine that the soul of his mother might have felt comfort when he achieved fame. Now he has departed from this world to a place from where nobody returns.

Stanza 5

Even the angels are sorry about his death. They are unable to save him. So they bless to immortalize his three books; namely, 'Daghey Jigar, ' ' Shaulaey Toor' and 'Aatishe Gul'. In the last of his books he has written some poems being moved by communal riots of those days.
Such communal riots are planned by the politicians in India from time to time and their mercenaries disturb the peace.

Stanza 6

There came in the form of procession mourners: the poet's Splendid Ideals, Desires, Adorations, Joys which were blinded with tears and Persuasions (whose wings are conspicuous feature) , his Love and Ties in melancholy mood, and Sorrows accompanied by Sighs. They were all with undressed hair, and tears were flowing from their eyes. The Procession was moving slowly and slowly. The whole procession looked like a train of ants seen near a stream in the summer season.

Stanza 7

Jigar sometimes composed lines of his poems after mid-night. Only his wife was present in the room where he slept. I slept in the other room. But his singing was so enchanting that it awakened me and made me lost. I sometimes felt that the rooms were also spell-bound. The rooms responded to him with their echo when he sang his loving poems in his house. It is now really painful that he has left the world, and has also left them in great woe.

Stanza 8

The words within inverted comas “A compartment of train for me be reserved as life's journey has come to an end, and I have to go to Other Land” are the actual words spoken by Jigar in depression one day before his death.
A few relatives of Jigar were present in his house in a very sorrowful condition when he was nearing death. His wife was very much aggrieved. She was bereft of pleasures of life.

Stanza 9

In this stanza actual scene of the house is depicted when his bier was being taken out for the funeral prayer. Every one who was present at that time was weeping.

The people who come to mourn the death of a man generally leave the house after some time. Similarly, the people who came to mourn the death of Jigar were also intending to leave house after some time.

Day and night, as usual, will go on happening by turns; but for his dear wife, both day and night will be gloomy, as her joy has taken flight in the death of her husband.

Stanza 10

Actual scene of the funeral prayer (Namaze-Janaza) before the burial is depicted in this stanza. The prayer was held near his house.

The weeping is stopped when the people offer funeral prayer. But the heart is sad. The whole atmosphere was surcharged with grief. People prayed for the consolation of his soul. But death was not the least affected by the grief.

Stanza 11

When Jigar was buried, his grave felt joyous to receive his body. The Muslims believe that after the burial, angels come to ask the dead a few questions. Angels asked Jigar some questions in his grave, but they were amazed to see in the grave a white dazzling light instead of darkness. The reason for this light was that Jigar was saintly at heart though once he was wine personified. Jigar was actually dark-coloured, but his soul was supposed to be white (a striking contrast) . He enjoyed the most tranquil rest in his grave, unmindful of the worries of life.

Stanza 12

Wines in this stanza have been figuratively portrayed to hold condolence meeting on his death by hard breast-beating. All sorts of Wines (Wines of different colors, of different tastes and of different races) attended the meeting. A resolution to mourn the death of Jigar was proposed in the meeting, which was agreed upon and then passed by standing, without a single vote of dissent. The reason why Wines mourned his death was that Jigar once loved them more than any other man. He was once a record-breaker in drinking wine.

Stanza 13

Some Wines were so much spirited that they came to his grave to pay him homage. Their eyes were red and their hearts were brave. (It is to be noted that after drinking spirited wine the eyes become red and heart becomes brave) . These were the Wines Jigar once preferred to other Wines. But when he realized later that they were the cause of nuisance, he divorced them. They came fully disguised and were ashamed because they were divorced by the poet. The mourners who were present at his grave could not recognize them.

In the last two lines, the figure changes into factuality because Jigar gave up drinking in his later age.

Stanza 14

When Jigar was on the death-bed, one day he called my mother, and told his wife who was sitting beside him that, after his death, she should neither break her bangles nor give anything in charity for the peace of his soul. When he was asked the reason be his wife for forbidding her from giving alms for the consolation of his soul, he said, “I have done much for myself. You need not to do any thing for me.” His wife who was a righteous and gentle lady promised him that she would fulfill his will.

Stanza 15

In fact, Jigar wanted to be buried at Moradabad, his birth-place; but Asghar Gondwi, his mentor, once said that every thing of him (Jigar) would be done at his (Asghar's) house at Gonda. His prophecy finally came to be true. Jigar died on September 9,1960 at Gonda and was buried there.

Stanza 16

I imagine that his father was in paradise. Hearing the news of his son's sad demise, he felt a shock of grief. The paradise is the place where ordinarily the news of this world does not reach. But the angels specially delivered the news of Jigar's death to his father.

In paradise some angels were reciting the NAAT (a poem in praise of the Prophet, Mohammed which Jigar composed after the performance of 'Haj' in the year 1953) in a very sweet voice. God who loves extremely his dear prophet was attracted by the singing of the NAAT and become so much rapturous that he allotted Jigar one of heaven's chambers.

Stanza 17

People were over head and ears in grief. They could not find any relief so far.

Earth claimed that the dead body of Jigar should be given to it. Grave (a sub-ordinate of Earth) swore that it would not spoil his body. Hearing the arguments of Earth, angels, the inhabitants of the sky declared that his soul would be put in the sky to shine like a star. So, it should be given to them.

God judged the case and then ordered that the body of Jigar be given to earth and Sky has a rightful claim over his soul. By this order, angels very warmly received his soul.

Stanza 18

It is true that Jigar in his childhood was trained by his father in singing and throat- controlling. Marsias are Elegiac verses in Urdu composed on the battle of Karbala in which Hazrat Imam Husain and others were beheaded mercilessly. He spoke out first couplet at the age of eight. When his father heard his couplet, he scolded him saying that he should not make couplets too early.

Many poets tried to copy his style of singing but in vain.

Stanza 19

When Jigar was in his early age, his father died. Thereafter, he was surrounded by many difficulties. He was condemned, disowned and deemed inferior by his paternal relatives. Only Maulvi Ali Asghar, his step-uncle who was a gentle and righteous man, supported him. His relatives in the initial stage of his career did not think that he would become so great. Some of the relatives even mocked when the people said that Jigar had become a poet.

Stanza 20

He was forced by the circumstances to drink wine, but wine could not spoil the sublimity of his character. His feelings and senses were all the more awakened when he was drunk. In that condition he did not utter foul words. He realized that drinking of wine was bad. His hair was long and he often neglected the dressing of his beard. He was an abnormal drinker of wine.

Stanza 21

A famous mystic poet of those days, Asghar Gondwi, owned Jigar and guessed at first sight that he was to become great.

Jigar was taken by his admirers, was offered drinks, and his Ghazals regaled them; but he was given nothing. Then Asghar urged him not to attend the Mushaira without his consultation. Now, when people wanted to take Jigar, Asghar asked them to give him atleast Rs.50, which was initially fixed as his fee for a Mushaira. His fee began swelling with his growing fame, and it went beyond Rs.1000 (a good sun in those days) excluding travelling expenses.

Asghar Gondwi married off his sister-in-law to Jigar on her condition that Jigar would have to give up drinking. On breaking his promise not to drink, the marriage got terminated resulting in divorce. After about 15 years he remarried the same lady. Then he gave up drinking for ever, and led a good conjugal life, but, unfortunately, remained childless.

Asghar Gondwi is worthy of praise as he helped Jigar a lot and tried to uplift him.

Stanza 22

Jigar inherited poetic talents from his father, Maulvi Ali Nazar, and his grand father, Maulvi Amjad Ali, as they were also poets. He also took blessings of some spiritual men. A few incidents of his life and wine gave a push to his muse with the result that many themes came out of his heart like green plants which make a plot of land beautiful, attractive and worthy to be enjoyed. The poems of Jigar are likened to the colourful, fresh and fair flowers of the garden. They shall for ever continue to please men of poetic tastes.

Stanza 23

The incident referred to in this stanza is true. Various books written on Jigar after his death corroborate the fact that when Jigar was staying at Bhopal, a man who was jealous of his because of his extra-ordinary fame, tried to give him some poison by mixing it with his food. But it was discovered, and the man was caught & questioned. He later on confessed that he had actually committed the heinous crime. At this, Jigar at once forgave him. It shows the sublimity of his character.

Even such men as were jealous of Jigar are very sorry.

Stanza 24

Jigar was staying at his friend's in Bombay. He had two thousand rupees in his pocket which were given to him as fee of a Mushaira. He was at night lying on a cot. A person, presuming him asleep, picked the pocket of his Sherwani which was hanging on a peg. He was not sleeping at that time and was noticing all the actions of the man. But he said nothing and let the thief go. In the morning, he asked for some rupees from a friend of his, but did not disclose the name of the person who picked his pocket. This incident is mentioned in various books.

Stanza 25

Forgetting had been Jigar's habit since boyhood. He used to do good to others and after doing good, he forgot it fro ever. He wrote several recommendatory letters daily for the men who approached him and wanted to get employment somewhere. He often gave the needy some money as loan, but did not think it proper to take money back.

Stanza 26

He was very fond of playing cards. He played at a stretch for hours together, and was so much engrossed in the game that he even forgot to take food. He got irritated when he lost the game, and put forth various lame excuses. Honesty was in his nature, so he wanted to play fair game and sometimes lost it owing to his honesty.

Stanza 27

When at home, Jigar was very often reprimanded by his wife, a strict and religious lady, for playing cards. Often an interesting quarrel arose in the house between them on this score, and he was compelled to please his wife by promising that he would never play them; but when the anger of his dear wife cooled down, he forgot all his abjurations and promises, and started playing cards again. Sometimes, he burnt the cards. But getting opportunity, he managed to buy them again.

The idea in the figure used in the last two lines of this stanza has been borrowed from the belief of the Hindus that the dead after cremation is born again and again until he attains salvation.

Stanza 28

He always welcomed his guests warmly. People came from far and near, and stayed in his house. He did not let even the unwanted guests feel that he did not like them. He treated the guests properly according to their position and gradation.

Stanza 29

Jigar's way of talking or advising was very peculiar. He did not come to the point directly, but started beating about the bush. He felt and enjoyed poetry, but lacked ability to discuss it. Though he is no more in the world, his verses are a source of instruction to us.

Stanza 30

Though he was very great, he did not consider himself so. He was neither narrow nor arrogant at all. Often he used to say that he had no qualities of his own but became great because of the blessings of spiritual men. He achieved greatness step by step, and therefore it was permanent.

For the interest of the readers I write here an incident that proves his humility.

Once it so happened that a number of men were sitting with him on the carpet in his sitting room. They put their shoes outside the room. After some time, drizzling began. I was standing outside the room, but it did not come to my mind that I should remove their shoes to the shade. Jigar at once stood up and began to pick up the shoes. Seeing him doing so, some men from within the room rushed, and did not let him do so. Then turning to me, he said,

“God will give you respect,
If you respect the elders' shoes.”

Stanza 31

Jigar hated flattery. In this connection an incident of his life is given below: -

Once he was staying at Hyderabad. He was at a place busy in playing cards. He was favourite of the Nawab of Hyderabad. A man came from the Nawab and requested him to compose some poem in praise of the Nawab to be recited on the occasion of his birth-day ceremony. Jigar at once retorted that he was a poet, not a clown. The Nawab, a wise man, was not displeased to know the reply. He valued him all more. It was only the scheme of those who were jealous of him, but it fell through.

He was witty, sensitive and very fair in his dealings. He had such frankness as is rarely found in men.

He did not like ills at all, and tried to annihilate them by means of his songs.

Stanza 32

He earned so much wealth that neither the poets prior to him nor his contemporaries could earn; but he was very generous and spent his money in helping the poor. When he was at home, he kept some money out of the knowledge of his wife. He often put some rupees under the pillow, sometimes in a tin with a lid, or in some book. This money ordinarily was meant to be given to the men who visited him to seek his help. It was very interesting to se Jigar searching for the money urgently and confusedly. He was not sure about the places where he had concealed the currency notes. Sometimes turned the bed upside down, sometimes he opened the boxes, and then shut them confusedly pronouncing Lahol (cursing the Shaitan) , sometimes he turned the pages of the books. This was all done stealthily lest wife should see his perplexity. She sometimes smelt the rat and enjoyed the sight.

Stanza 33

The literal meaning of Ghazal is to converse with the lady-love or to express something about her. In other words, it can be said that generally in it are expressed such emotions and experiences of life as are concerned with beauty and love. As these emotions are universal, so the presentation of them in Ghazal helped it much in becoming favourite of the people. But if Ghazal had stayed within the narrow bounds of the above definition, it would not have reached the present place. It was, therefore, necessary for it to take up different conditions and feelings. So, even after centering on beauty and love as their favourite themes, the poets took into its domain social, cultural, political, historical, religious, mystical, philosophical and psychological aspects of the life of man. At every stage, it went on changing according to the call of time. That is why it still survives, and has a life of its own.

The structure of Ghazal proved helpful to the poet in adopting different ideas. In each of the couplets which are between the first and the last ones, the poet presents a complete thought. Therefore every couplet is itself a unit. In this way, the poet presents different thoughts in different couplets. Thus, it becomes the beautiful product of the poet's imagination.

As Ghazal is very close to human feelings softness and delicacy are sure to appear in the language. When all these aspects of Ghazal are combined with music of its words, it all the more influences the people. The reason why it is liked so much is that it is expressed in lovely symbols and signs carrying deep and hidden meanings.

After looking into the development of Ghazal, we find that at different stages of life it served as translator of the time. Thus its shape is polished and scope extended.

I write here an interesting incident that caused me to compose this stanza. Once it so happened that Saghar Nizami, an Urdu poet, came along with his wife to meet Jigar who was then staying in the house of Maulvi Mohammed Ahmad in Mohalla Lal Bagh, Moradabad. Saghar Nizami's wife recited before Jigar a Ghazal composed by her. Jigar heared it and praised it a little; but when he was coming out, he smiled and said in a strange way, “Aurat aur Ghazal” (Ghazal and a lady!) .

Stanza 34

He was really the life and spirit of Mushairas. When he was alive, he was the only poet who won the hearts of his listeners with the magic of his poem sung by a painfully sweet throat he was gifted with. Ordinarily in the Mushairas he was given the chance of reciting his poems after all the other poets had sung their poems. During the singing of other poets the audience remained unserious, but when he started singing, there was perfect silence. Nobody dared disturb the decorum of the Mushairas. The audiences were rapt and lost while he sang. Not only this, but the people also remained eager to have a glimpse of him.

Stanza 35

Jigar was truly patriotic. His love for his Motherland is fully exhibited in his poems. In Pakistan also he was very famous. He attended the Mushairas on invitation from Pakistan. The Government of Pakistan once desired him to immigrate there, and promised to give him a beautiful building with a motor car if he settled their permanently; but he flatly refused to accept the offer.

He also wrote many poems in Persian due to which he earned fame in Iran. Some poems of his were translated in his lifetime, and were sent to english0speaking countries. This translation, I remember, was made by Mr. Mohammed Ahmad who was a judge posted at Gorakhpur at a certain time.

Stanza 36

The method of his composing poems was very peculiar. Although some of his couplets were extempore; generally it was his way to compose his poems when he was in his proper mood. He began humming in loneliness and made outlines of plants with leaves, flowers and buds. All of a sudden, from the buds or flowers he drew a line either slanting or straight and then wrote a couplet. In this way, when there were some couplets, he made of them a beautiful poem. After a few corrections, the poem was complete.

He has made his poems with the extract of his liver (the equivalent word for liver in Urdu is Jigar which is also the pen-name of the poet) , and therefore they make the listeners drunk.

Stanza 37

Jigar was not sensual. He was in fact a sensuous poet. His love was pure. He had a respect for his beloved in his heart. He started his loving his lady and when he reached the climax of his love of God. He was such a drinker as remained excessively intoxicated; but his will-power was so strong that when he made abjuration, he gave up drinking for ever. The giving-up of wine had a bad effect on his health, and the result was that he suffered from various diseases. After giving up drinking, he became spiritual and performed 'Haj'.

Stanza 38

Jigar was very sensitive and emotional. He had delicate feelings which sometimes became too intense. His wonderful flight of fancy, his sincerity, his passionate intensity, his piety of soul and purity of inspiration gave sometimes a spiritual colour to his poems.

He did not pass through the stages of beauty and love carelessly, but he full well experienced the hardships of the journey. He felt it so much that he absorbed their spirit in himself. Often he is lost in them too.

He composed his poems when his feelings were intense and when his thoughts inflamed his over quick imagination.

In the beginning he enjoyed various shapes of beauty but when he reached the last rung of his love, he found that every breath of his was filled with the air of beauty.

It is a fact that beauty is unlimited but to contract and absorb it in himself is called love. Jigar has tasted the relish of this love.

Stanza 39

Jigar's views are very clear in his poetry. His poetry is the image of his life. He was not in the habit of saying one thing and doing another. As his couplets came direct from his heart, they touched the hearts of the listeners. There is a flood of passions in his poetry, but it is a craftily dammed by his art. As he was the lover of beauty, his poetry is also a product of beauty. As is the tradition that in the beginning the critics are generally antagonistic to the artists, they criticized him also; but they fell into astonishment when he was appreciated by all and sundry.

Stanza 40

Jigar was a great poet. His poetry is a thing to be enjoyed. It is not an art without substance. Educated as well as uneducated persons can enjoy his poetry, according to their understanding. This was the reason why he got commendations of all and became the favourite of the masses. Even in his lifetime the title of 'Ghazal King 'was bestowed upon him. He had seen the ups and downs of life. So, his poetry is an outcome of his own experience.

In the opinion of jigar beauty and love are one and the same thing. Apparently the words, beauty and love seem very ordinary, but these are the only words in which the secret of both the words is hidden. In the poetry of Jigar we find several ideas about these terms. Sometimes he declares that beauty is the cause and love its effect and sometimes he calls love, the cause; and beauty, the effect. At some stages he passes through a place where he finds beauty and love mixed up. In other words, when love reaches its climax, it becomes beauty and when beauty is lost in seeing itself, it becomes love. In such a state of Love, Mansoor, a great Saint yore had uttered “Anal Haque” (I am God) .

Stanza 41

He did not like unrhymed verses. His poetry is modeled on the technique of the poets of old. His couplets are proportionate and rhythmical. This conventional form of poetry suited him best because he was extremely musical when he sang his poems. Many of his poems can be interpreted in spiritual sense. The quotation “Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thoughts” comes true when we go through his poetry. He was over packed with feelings. Somebody has rightly said about him, “had he not been a poet, he would have been mad.”

Stanza 42

Jigar maintained self-respect in his life. He did not copy the ideas of the past or present poets. He was not a blind follower of any poet. He used to sit in the company of such great personages as Iqbal Suhel, Mirza Ahsan Beg, Suleman Nadvi and Rashid Ahmad Siddiqi but he did not dye himself in the color of any one of them. He put the influences he got from such august men into the glass of his own poetic wine. He had a God gifted quality to extract the essence from the views of others and drew the conclusion thereof according to his own taste. This made him all the more polished in beauty and art. If we read his poems, we find in them the influence of the blessings of his Pir (Spiritual Guide) , the late Maulana Abdul Ghani Manglori.

Stanza 43

Perhaps we can mention no other Modern Ghazal poet who was so much moved by adverse circumstances and great events as Jigar; but he remained optimistic and found hope in despair. Whatever he viewed and experienced, he poetized unhesitatingly. The Government of that time often tried to shut his mouth by monetary temptations but in vain. The young generation very much liked this tendency, which had been initiated by Hasrat (an Urdu poet) : but in Jigar we find it all the more prominent. Hasrat took it lightly, but in Jigar it is the beating of his heart. According to Prof. Rashid Ahmad Siddiqi, this is the place where character makes poetry high or low. Here we find actual difference between poetry and propaganda.

Stanza 44

Generally, it had been the tradition from yore that the poets translated the feelings of the lovers and showed them bowing before their lady-loves to invite their attention and favours; but Jigar opened a new chapter by translating the feelings of the lady-loves. He maintained equal respect of the lovers and the lady-loves. The character of the lady-love presented by the Urdu poets in general is not good. We do not like it, but the character of the lady-love presented by Jigar is so fine that we cannot help appreciate it. Urdu poetry is really grateful to him for this novelty.

Jigar is the poet of love. But he is opposed to purchase at low cost his beloved as most second rate poets do. He knows very well the delicate relation of beauty and love and wants to maintain it all costs.

Jigar's attachment with Asghar was personal, but in poetry he was quite different. In Asghar's verses, we find excess of thoughts, but lack of emotions. In Jigar's verses, we fi

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Poor Happy Jimmy

(tribute to jim croce)
Give him a soft guitar to play what he choose
He aint got no fancy chords
Only got his blues
Poor happy jimmy
I didnt know him very well but he was with me
And I wont take a dime just to make it rhyme
Cause I cried and cried the day he died
Poor happy jimmy
Give him sweet melodies he sing with all he has
He got a funky paraphrase
It sound like good time jazz
Poor happy jimmy
I didnt know him very well but he was with me
And I wont put the blame on the aeroplane
But I boo-hood on the day he flew
Poor happy jimmy
I wonder why
That I cant forget all the things you said about your life and times
You set a spell inside
Oh james your soft guitar it make me feel to cry
The sole consolation is
A good man never dies
God bless you jimmy
I love you with all my heart so deep within me
And you wont see the end of your lonely friend
Cause Ill pray and pray for you every day
Poor happy jimmy
Poor happy jimmy ....

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I could have done other useful things than writing a poem

Sometimes I have regrets writing poems
Love poems, poems about virtue and heroism
Poems that explain myself, that justify
This nothingness
That fill this emptiness,

What are these but signs and metaphors of
My weaknesses,
Symbols of my hopelessness
Ciphers of my uselessness
To life’s dreams, unfulfilled, stars that I have not
Reach or even touch with the words in my lips

I could have danced, and danced so well
Sweat things out shedding sighs and skins on the floors
I could have played a role, acted my way out
Exiting through the doors of author’s characters
And feel this sense of
It was her it was him it was not me

Sometimes I feel
To be a poet is to be dumb and dead
To demand nothing but this honor
This laurel this principle
That I cannot eat that I cannot sell that I cannot
Make use of,
Useless poetry, trashy, nothing but bad breathes
Of my being
Foul and nauseating to my sense of
What I dream what I want to be
To be this great, respected man of power
One that commands rather than take orders
From someone claiming superior feathers

I have long wanted to stop but here I am again
An addict to poetry destined for rehabilitation
In distant cruel word processing centers

Just like you, here I am again, not stopping
My fingers always wanting to type the words
My mind always listening
my heart always mouthing
Words, words, words, these words
This poem

This poem is born and I am its tributary
I am this poet now without a face without a name
I am but a mouth, fingers to my hand
Always not stopping, how can I tell you why?

When I myself, do not really know. I am this poem
With an unknown author, I am this poem just written
Taking shape like a candle lighting,
Flowing from your thoughts
Taking the forms of beings unknown to us
We claim we understand we claim we can live with
You are now lost asking the way
You could have done other things than reading this poem

Precisely this is what I really feel. Do you feel it now?
Yes.

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At new low ebb

She took and sunk me to low ebb
I was entangled in monster’s web
I had no easy route to escape
I was unable to think or give shape

There may be many ups and down
People may show discourtesy and frown
You may be reduced to nothing and work as pawn
You may be crushed like grass in the lawn

She did not realize simple fact and made all hell
Everything was going ahead with plan and very well
We were leading simple life and good stories to tell
It proved nice all the time and did not face any trail

It was only for on ward march
No going back from the start
It was all for simple asking
Always rousing welcome and no kicking

As it always happen, there starts bad phase
You are down with fame and unable to show the face
You may not be able come out from house and counter
You need to face it bravely with the fear of lashes from hunter

There may be flow of bad words for your action
You may face criticism and solid reaction
No one may blame womenfolk but only man
Why was he not in position to stop or can?

She was string headed woman and couldn’t control tamper
She spoiled the relation with all her anger
It was unbecoming of good couple with good repute
How could I offer any counter or refute?

It was undoing of all my good work
I was feeling uneasy and unable to eat with pork
It was proving difficult to much to my discomfort
My ship was at mid sea waiting call at ports

It is not good for us to survive
Hostility may end but peace can’t be revived
You may live but without any sweetness or aim
How can we stand against odd and claim?


If you can salvage your ship amidst crisis
It will prove your point without any thesis
You may come to be known as strong contender
As it is not the worth job for the pretender

You got to rise from the ashes
You may have strong wishes
Not all may reach to the shore as fishes
You must come out victorious with fine finish

Lie low but not too low
Bow to Him but not to allow
Think of disaster but not of going down
Seeds may definitely grow if they are sown

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Rumination Haj

Caught in an expressive cul-de-sac,
all imagery goes down the tube
iconoclastically, with lack
of space that curves when artists cube,
on a rumination haj,
searching an interior Mecca
thoughts collected as collage,
minimally like a Necker.


David Hadjou reviews John Adams’s Hallelujah Junction (“Music Lessons: A memoir by the composer John Adams is a collage of memory criticism, theory and ruminations on creativity, ” NYT Book Review, October 26,2008) :
Commonly mistaken for a minimalist, Adams has employed the minimalist aesthetic primarily as a point of departure. He recognized fairly early that “minimalism as a governing aesthetic could and would rapidly exhaust itself, ” as he writes here. “Like Cubism in painting, it was a radically new idea, but its reductive worldview would soon leave its practitioners caught in an expressive cul-de-sac.” Adams’s importance as a composer is rooted not so much in his having done anything new, but, rather, in his having done very well the things he has done: operas (“Nixon in China” and “The Death of Klinghoffer, ” both staged by Peter Sellars) , symphonic choral works (“On the Transmigration of Souls, ” an elegy to the victims of the Sept.11 attacks, which won the Pulitzer Prize for music in 2003) , piano pieces and a dozen or so other major compositions of various kinds. His music is minimal in the sense that Adams employs as few materials as necessary, rather than as few as possible, though he strives for and tends to achieve a maximalism of effect. With “Hallelujah Junction, ” Adams has put in prose an argument against the ideology of aesthetic continuum, a case that his music has always articulated eloquently by example. “That particular continuum I found ridiculously exclusive, being founded on a kind of Darwinian view of stylistic evolution, ” he argues. If a composition “didn’t in some way advance the evolution of the language, yielding progress either by a technological innovation or in the increasing complexity of the discourse, it was not even worth discussing.” Who cares? John Adams. And, so, now do we.


10/26/08

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Job Networks and Enlightenment Rooms

The unemployed proletariat had just finished with the Centrelink’s rigmarole,
Of paper forms, and signing his name, and all the stuff the unemployed got to do.
Running around doing the paper chase, which is a part of the dole regime.
Next, it was the Job Networks, the employment organization now privatised.
A new dole treadmill for the unemployed, encouraging an attitude highly industrialized.

“Welcome to Job Network” the t.v. monitor said, on a recorded video machine.
“We are a privatized organization for the purpose of getting you into employment.
We are here to help you to find your talents, and potentials, to improve your
Abilities, so that you can re-enter the work force to have a life of independents.
This is far better than being on welfare forever with your dependants”.

The interviewers in the Job Network office were old grannies,
Complete with false colorings and artificial additives.
I’m your case manager, I’m assigned to you, and you are here to sign a contract.
The Job Search And Activities Plan and responsibilities and employment to find.
To ensure you’re meeting your obligations to society not to be in your dole grind”.

The granny said.”Under governmental policies your association with us is for all life.”
Granny continued.“There will be no talk-back, yak-back, smart-back nor fart-back.
If we find you to be deficient in abilities, then you have to do a course of some sort.”
The proletariat looked a bit stunned said. “At my age, late forties, it's a bit late.”
Granny said. “It’s never too late to train.” she did not like his mind’s negative state.

The proletariat said to the false colored granny with artificial additives.
I got a really bum hip, and with it I can't do much, and it seems I can't have a pension.
I’m not 97 per cent dead, nor can I work in a factory any more, it’s quite hopeless.”
Continuing. “I’m 49, over the hill and even at 40 no one is going to hire me any more”.
Granny said. “There’s anti-age-discrimination laws that help’s you in life furthermore.”

The proletariat bemused said. “Funny, I never heard. Daadaa-daatatitit-dududdaada-daaa”
THIS IS THE CHANNEL NINE NEWS, THE MOTORING ORGANIZATION
DISCRIMINATED AGAINST THIS MIDDLE AGED BLOKE FOR A CLERICAL
JOB AND THE ANTI-DISCRIMINATION BOARD IS TAKING ACTION.
FURTHERMORE ITS INTOLERABLE THE UNEMPLOYED CANT HAVE TRACTION.

This made grandma very angry, and she looked at the proletariat with contempt.
And said that the proletariat didn't want to work and had a severe attitude problem.
Grandma said it was about time to do a attitude course against negative attitudes.
It was being held in the same building in the “Enlightenment Room” for all dolies.
Grandma said it’s about time that the proletariats guard against their follies.

“Follies? ? I don’t think I have attitudes nor follies” The proletariat said, and continued.
I lost my job due to imports from India, how can I possibly find work if Australia
Imports everything in untold billions of dollars worth of imported goods.
Further more, Australia has call centres and “IT” jobs in India, sucking all jobs out
Of Australia, so how could I possibly find work, faaarout.

Grandma was starting to become impatient with this proletariat smart arse.
“We have anti-discrimination laws against what you’re saying.”
The proletariat was becoming exasperated with the artificially colored grandma.
“Since we import indiscriminately from all countries around the world relentlessly
I can't see how I’m discriminating against any country, we still import tremendously.

“Right! ” Grandma said. “I’m fed up with your negative attitudes, it is obvious to me.
You do not understand the governments Micro-Macro Economical Reforms,
Nor industrial Labour Reforms, that has been done in recent years to better your life.
You sign your contract or else we will breach you, and then you’ll be on the street.
Also you’ll do this attitude course in the “Enlightenment Room” move your feet! ”


(15/12/04)

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Stealth Draft?

To all men & women ages 18-25
DOD Directive 1404.10 is signed
Military Draft stealthily revived
Youth support of war redefined

ROTMS

Read the Directive below very carefully and decide for yourself.

******************************** ******************

Department of Defense
DIRECTIVE
NUMBER 1404.10
23 January 2009
USD(P&R)
SUBJECT: DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce
References: See Enclosure 1
1. PURPOSE. This Directive:
a. Reissues DoD Directive (DoDD) 1404.10 (Reference (a)) under a new title to establish the
policy through which an appropriately sized subset of the DoD civilian workforce is preidentified
to be organized, trained, and equipped in a manner that facilitates the use of their
capabilities for operational requirements. These requirements are typically away from the
normal work locations of DoD civilians, or in situations where other civilians may be evacuated
to assist military forces where the use of DoD civilians is appropriate. These employees shall be
collectively known as the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce. Members of the DoD
Civilian Expeditionary Workforce shall be organized, trained, cleared, equipped, and ready to
deploy in support of combat operations by the military; contingencies; emergency operations;
humanitarian missions; disaster relief; restoration of order; drug interdiction; and stability
operations of the Department of Defense in accordance with DoDD 3000.05 (Reference (b)) .
b. Updates policies and responsibilities for the designation of part of the DoD Civilian
Expeditionary Workforce using the existing category of Emergency-Essential (E-E) civilian
employee positions, and establishes policies and responsibilities for the designation of part of the
DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce using new categories of Non-Combat Essential (NCE)
positions and Capability-Based Volunteers (CBVs) employees and former DoD employees. All
four categories make up the newly designated DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce.
c. Supersedes any conflicting portions of other DoD issuances. Such instances shall be
identified by the Heads of the DoD Components to the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel
and Readiness (USD(P&R)) .
2. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to:
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
2
a. OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the
Department of Defense, the Defense Agencies, the DoD Field Activities, and all other
organizational entities within the Department of Defense (hereafter referred to collectively as the
“DoD Components”) .
b. All appropriated and non-appropriated fund positions and DoD civilian employees of the
DoD Components. Excludes dual status National Guard and Reserve Technicians and contractor
employees.
3. DEFINITIONS. See Glossary.
4. POLICY. It is DoD policy to:
a. Rely on a mix of capable military members and DoD civilian employees to meet DoD
global national security mission requirements. DoD civilian employees are an integral part of
the Total Force. They serve in a variety of positions, provide essential capabilities and, where
appropriate for civilians to do so, support mission requirements such as combat, contingencies,
emergency operations; humanitarian and civic assistance activities; disaster relief; restoration of
order; drug interdiction; and stability operations of the Department of Defense, herein
collectively referred to as “expeditionary requirements.”
b. Identify a subset of the DoD civilian workforce as the DoD Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce. These civilian employees are organized, ready, trained, cleared, and equipped in a
manner that enhances their availability to mobilize and respond urgently to expeditionary
requirements. As practicable,
(1) To support workforce stability and deployment predictability, the timeframes during
which the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce is susceptible to expeditionary assignments
will be designated in 6-month rotational periods. Tours will be determined through collaboration
of the combatant commanders, career field managers, functional community managers, and
civilian employees, as applicable. The portion of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce
that is within the 6-month window of deployment susceptibility shall maintain full preparedness
as trained, cleared, and ready.
(2) Individual deployment tours shall not exceed 2 years. Consecutive deployments
should generally not be approved without at least a 90-day period of reintegration between
deployments and assurance that medical clearance requirements are met.
c. Integrate DoD civilian workforce capabilities into DoD Total Force planning processes.
(1) Civilian manpower requirements shall be sourced and designated consistent with the
manpower policy and procedures in DoD Instruction (DoDI) 1100.22 (Reference (c)) .
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
3
(2) DoD civilian employees shall be included in the DoD Global Force Management
process as set forth in the Strategic Planning Guidance (Reference (d)) . Global Force
Management Board recommendations and decisions and Global Force Allocation Management
Plans shall reflect designation of DoD civilian employees as the preferred sourcing solution
when appropriate for non-warfighting Combatant Command request for forces and requests for
capabilities, and Joint Individual Augmentation requirements on Combatant Command Joint
Manning Documents for recurring and emergent mission requirements.
d. Designate and annually review the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce that will be
coded as:
(1) Emergency Essential (E-E) . A position-based designation to support the success of
combat operations or the availability of combat-essential systems in accordance with section
1580 of title 10, United States Code (U.S.C.) (Reference (e)) and will be designated as Key in
accordance with paragraph 4.d.(5) .
(2) Non-Combat Essential (NCE) . A position-based designation to support the
expeditionary requirements in other than combat or combat support situations and will be
designated as Key in accordance with paragraph 4.d.(5) .
(3) Capability-Based Volunteer (CBV) . An employee who may be asked to volunteer
for deployment, to remain behind after other civilians have evacuated, or to backfill other DoD
civilians who have deployed to meet expeditionary requirements in order to ensure that critical
expeditionary requirements that may fall outside or within the scope of an individual’s position
are fulfilled.
(4) Capability-Based Former Employee Volunteer Corps. A collective group of former
(including retired) DoD civilian employees who have agreed to be listed in a database as
individuals who may be interested in returning to Federal service as a time-limited employee to
serve expeditionary requirements or who can backfill for those serving other expeditionary
requirements. When these individuals are re-employed, they shall be deemed CBV employees.
(5) Key Employees. DoD civilian employees in positions designated as E-E and/or NCE
will be designated Key in accordance with DoDD 1200.7 (Reference (f)) .
e. Notify applicants and DoD civilian employees when positions are designated E-E and/or
NCE as part of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce.
(1) DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce positions should be pre-identified whenever
practicable.
(a) Vacant E-E and NCE Positions. Applicants must sign the DD Form 2365, “DoD
Civilian Expeditionary Workforce Agreement – Position Based, ” as a condition of employment.
Job announcements and positions descriptions for such positions must contain a statement that
the position is designated as E-E or NCE, that it is part of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce, and that a signature of the form is a condition of employment.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
4
(b) Encumbered Positions. Management must give DoD civilian employees whose
positions are identified as E-E or NCE as much notice as possible (generally not less than 90
calendar days advance notice of the E-E or NCE designation) . The incumbents shall be asked to
accept the new designation of the position as an E-E and/or NCE position, and if he or she does
so, he or she will be required to sign the DD Form 2365 as a condition of continued employment.
If an incumbent employee is unable or unwilling to accept such requirements, then every effort
will be undertaken to reassign the employee to a different position (including a vacant position)
if reasonably practicable, consistent with the needs of the DoD mission and approval of
management.
(2) DoD civilian employees in E-E or NCE positions may be directed to accept
deployment requirements of the position. However, whenever possible, the DoD Civilian
Expeditionary Workforce will be asked to serve expeditionary requirements voluntarily.
Management retains the authority to direct and assign civilian employees, either voluntarily,
involuntarily, or on an unexpected basis to accomplish the DoD mission.
(3) CBVs agree to list their capabilities and skills in a database established by this
Directive so that when an expeditionary requirement exists for a civilian employee with such
skills, the employee can be contacted and asked to volunteer for such an assignment. There is no
penalty for not agreeing to volunteer when asked to serve a specific expeditionary requirement.
To ensure that CBVs are aware of the voluntary nature of their potential service and the
readiness requirements, CBVs must sign a DD Form 2365-1, “DoD Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce Agreement – CBV, ” when they first agree to be listed in the database. CBVs will
receive training only after they sign this agreement.
(4) CBVs for the Defense Intelligence Components will be included in a classified
Intelligence Community-wide database. USD(I) will establish a policy and process for access to
the classified database to ensure that qualified DoD IC employees are considered for
expeditionary assignments.
f. Utilize the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce to meet expeditionary requirements
within their employing Component and across the Department of Defense as directed by an
authorized official (see Enclosure 2, paragraph 1.b.) whenever it is appropriate to use civilian
employees in support of the military to meet those expeditionary requirements.
g. Establish metrics to measure and assess on a regular basis DoD Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce readiness, to be known as the Expeditionary Workforce Deployment Index (DI) and
Readiness Index (RI) based on the following factors:
(1) Employee Capabilities. Ensure DoD civilian employees have the related
competencies, skills, abilities, medical, and psychological fitness to be successful in high
pressure and austere operational environments; ability to work as part of an integrated team
including military, contractor, Federal civilian, and foreign national personnel; a record of
successful job performance to deliver results; and the highest professional and ethical behavior to
maintain a deployment environment characterized by good order, discipline, and conduct.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
5
(2) Training. Train, develop, and prepare civilian employees who are part of the DoD
Civilian Expeditionary Workforce to meet expeditionary requirements and foreseeable risks they
are likely to face in the theater of operations in accordance with DoDD 1400.31 (Reference (g)) ,
DoDI 1400.32 (Reference (h)) , and DoDD 1322.18 (Reference (i)) . Training shall consist of:
(a) Initial orientation upon becoming part of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce, annual refresher training, pre-deployment (including theater-specific) training, as
well as on the job training, and post-deployment reintegration training, as appropriate and
practicable.
(b) Training on the use of any required specialized equipment needed for their
specific missions such as vehicles and communication systems.
(c) Counseling on their legal status under the Uniform Code of Military Justice
(Reference (j)) in accordance with Public Law 109-364 (2006) (Reference (k)) , the Military
Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act under DoDI 5525.11 (Reference (l)) , Secretary of Defense
Memorandum (Reference (m)) , and implementing regulations.
(d) Training in obtaining medical treatment and the related validating and
administrative processing for those who have responsibilities for supporting wounded and
injured civilians.
(e) Elements from the National Security Professional (NSP) training course to be
selected based on relevance to DoD civilian expeditionary requirements and duties.
(f) Training for DoD civilian employees, supervisors, and managers on recognizing
stress-related conditions that may result from serving expeditionary requirements.
(3) Medical and Psychological Fitness. The Department of Defense takes seriously the
need to protect the health of deployed DoD civilian employees and to medically assess DoD
civilian employees who serve expeditionary requirements.
(a) All DoD civilian employees who encumber an E-E or NCE position are required
to have an annual health assessment to determine whether the employee is available for
worldwide deployment. DoD civilian employees designated as CBVs and former DoD
employees will undergo a health assessment to determine whether they can meet a specific
expeditionary requirement.
(b) Force health protection pre- and post-health assessments shall be conducted for
DoD civilian employees in accordance with DoDI 6490.03 (Reference (n)) . Health assessment
information shall be submitted to the Defense Medical Surveillance system.
(c) For DoD civilian employees covered by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as
amended (section 791 through 794-d of title 29, U.S.C. (Reference (o))) , an individualized
assessment must be conducted to determine if the individual can perform the essential functions
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
6
of a DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce position with or without reasonable
accommodations. For E-E or NCE positions, the ability to be deployed worldwide, including
austere locations, is an essential condition of those positions. For CBV, the ability of an
employee to perform the essential functions of the position in the relevant deployed environment
must be assessed before he or she can be deployed or asked to stay behind when other civilians
have evacuated.
(d) DoD civilian employees who become ill, contract diseases, or who are injured or
wounded while deployed in support of U.S. military forces engaged in hostilities (see Glossary,
“contingency operation”) are eligible for medical evacuation and health care treatment and
services in military treatment facilities (MTFs) at no cost to the civilian employee and at the
same level and scope provided to military personnel. The same system used to track active duty
patients through the Military Health System shall be used to track DoD civilian employees
injured in theater while forward deployed. Civilians will not be charged personal leave while
undergoing therapy and/or rehabilitation due to a combat, combat support, duty related or
non-duty related injury incurred during deployment after they return from deployment.
(e) Deployed DoD civilian employees who were treated in theater continue to be
eligible for treatment in an MTF or civilian medical facility for compensable illnesses, diseases,
wounds, or injuries under the Department of Labor Office of Workers’ Compensation Program
(DOL OWCP) (Reference (p)) upon their return at no cost to the civilian employee. DoD
civilian employees who deployed and are subsequently determined to have compensable
illnesses, diseases, wounds, or injuries under the DOL OWCP programs also are eligible for
treatment in an MTF or civilian sector medical facility at no cost to the civilian employee.
(4) Administrative Preparedness. The employing DoD Component shall provide the
employees of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce with a valid Official Passport,
Common Access Card, Geneva Conventions Identification Card, and required security
clearances, when appropriate. DoD civilian employees who are part of the DoD Civilian
Expeditionary Workforce are required to maintain:
(a) Current and valid administrative documents and clearances.
(b) Current Family Care Plans.
h. Establish the appropriate level of deployment strength for each functional community to
ensure an adequately sized DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce, considering E-E, NCE, and
CBV designations.
i. Support and recognize the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce.
(1) When a DoD civilian employee who is part of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce is required to deploy away from his or her normal work location, he or she shall be
released and allowed to deploy in a timely fashion to meet an expeditionary requirement unless
there is a significant negative impact on the mission of his or her home unit. Those who are
reassigned from their normal position to serve expeditionary requirements will be granted the
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
7
right to return to the positions they held prior to their deployment or to a position of similar
grade, level, and responsibility within the same local organization, regardless of the length of
deployment. There shall be no retaliation because of an employee’s expression of interest in
serving an expeditionary requirement or because of such service. This includes threats or denial
of rights to return to pre-deployment positions, promotions, training opportunities, or other
career enhancing opportunities.
(2) DoD civilian employees shall be treated with high regard as an indication of the
Department’s respect for those who serve expeditionary requirements. Their service and
experience shall be valued, respected, and recognized as career enhancing.
(3) Families of deployed DoD civilian employees shall be supported and provided with
information on benefits and entitlements, and issues likely to be faced by the employee during
and upon return from a deployment.
(4) DoD civilian employees who meet the requirements are eligible for the Secretary of
Defense Medal for the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) . Other civilian awards and
recognition may be appropriate in accordance with USD(P&R) Memorandum (Reference (q)) .
j. Track and account for DoD civilians, including their daily locations, who are deployed to
assigned positions or unclassified temporary requirements in accordance with References (h)
and (n) . A Request for Personnel Action is required to document all unclassified civilian
deployments.
5. RESPONSIBILITIES. See Enclosure 2.
6. INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS
a. The Heads of the DoD Components shall:
(1) Collect data on E-E, NCE, and CBV civilian employees. See Enclosure 3 for
reporting instructions, and DoDI 1444.2 (Reference (r)) .
(2) Submit data in automated format to the USD(P&R) , in accordance with
Reference (r) . The Report Control Symbol is DD-PER(qrm) 1458.
b. The Defense Intelligence Components are required to collect but not report data, as
prescribed in paragraph 6.a.(2) . This data shall be held at the agency, and information shall be
made available on request to the USD(P&R) . Information collection shall be accomplished in
accordance with DoDI 8910.01 (Reference (s)) .
7. RELEASABILITY. UNLIMITED. This Directive is approved for public release and is
available on the Internet from DoD Issuances Web Site at http: //www.dtic.mil/whs/directives.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
8
8. EFFECTIVE DATE. This Directive is effective immediately.
Enclosures
1. References
2. Responsibilities
3. Automation Instructions and Coding Description
Glossary
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
9 ENCLOSURE 1
ENCLOSURE 1
REFERENCES
(a) DoD Directive 1404.10, “Emergency-Essential (E-E) DoD U.S. Citizen Civilian
Employees, ” April 10,1992 (hereby canceled)
(b) DoD Directive 3000.05, “Military Support for Stability, Security, Transition, and
Reconstruction (SSTR) Operations, ” November 28,2005
(c) DoD Instruction 1100.22, “Guidance for Determining Workforce Mix, ” September 7,2006
(d) Strategic Planning Guidance (SPG) FY 2006-2011, March 1,2004
(e) Sections 101(a) (4) ,101(a) (13) ,688,1580,12301(a) ,12302,12304, and 12406, and
Chapter 15 of title 10, United States Code
(f) DoD Directive 1200.7, “Screening the Ready Reserve, ” November 18,1999
(g) DoD Directive 1400.31, “DoD Civilian Work Force Contingency and Emergency
Planning and Execution, ” April 28,1995
(h) DoD Instruction 1400.32, “DoD Civilian Work Force Contingency and Emergency
Planning Guidelines and Procedures, ” April 24,1995
(i) DoD Directive 1322.18, “Military Training, ” January 13,2009
(j) Sections 801 through 946 of title 10, United States Code (Uniform Code of Military
Justice)
(k) Public Law 109-364, “John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year
2007, ” October 17,2006
(l) DoD Instruction 5525.11, “Criminal Jurisdiction Over Civilians Employed By or
Accompanying the Armed Forces Outside the United States, Certain Service Members, and
Former Service Members, ” March 3,2005
(m) Secretary of Defense Memorandum, “UCMJ Jurisdiction Over DoD Civilian Employees,
DoD Contractor Personnel, and Other Persons Serving With or Accompanying the Armed
Forces Overseas during Declared War and in Contingency Operations, ” March 10,2008
(n) DoD Instruction 6490.03, “Deployment Health, ” August 11,2006
(o) Sections 791 through 794d of title 29, United States Code (“The Rehabilitation Act of
1973, as amended”)
(p) “Department of Labor Office of Workers’ Compensation Program (DOL OWCP) , ”
Sections 8101 through 8173 of title 5, United States Code
(q) Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Memorandum, “Secretary of
Defense Medal for the Global War on Terrorism, ” August 9,2007, as amended by Under
Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Memorandum, “Secretary of Defense
Medal for the Global War on Terrorism-Change 1, ” April 7,2008
(r) DoD Instruction 1444.2, “Consolidation of Automated Civilian Personnel Records, ”
September 16,1987
(s) DoD Instruction 8910.01, “Information Collection and Reporting, ” March 6,2007
(t) DoD Directive 5400.11, “DoD Privacy Program, ” May 8,2007
(u) DoD 5400.11-R, “Department of Defense Privacy Program, ” May 14,2007
(v) DoD 6025.18-R, “DoD Health Information Privacy Regulation, ” January 24,2003
(w) DoD Directive 5124.02, “Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness
(USD(P&R)) , ” June 23,2008
(x) Section 2105 of title 5, United States Code
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
10 ENCLOSURE 2
ENCLOSURE 2
RESPONSIBILITIES
1. USD(P&R) . The USD(P&R) shall:
a. Manage and oversee implementation of this Directive; develop policy and implement
procedural guidance for DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce designation and utilization.
b. Execute the delegated authority from the Secretary of Defense for the mandatory use of
DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce positions designated as E-E and NCE to meet validated
DoD mission requirements outside a designated DoD civilian employee’s employing DoD
Component through the Secretary of Defense Operations Book (SDOB) process.
c. Authorize the voluntary use of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce to meet
validated DoD mission requirements outside a designated DoD civilian employee’s employing
DoD Component. Normally, this will be done through the SDOB process.
d. Ensure that the requirement to use E-E and NCE Civilian Expeditionary Workforce
positions and DoD civilian employee CBVs to meet expeditionary requirements outside a DoD
civilian employee’s employing Component is validated with the employing DoD Component, the
Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Combatant Commands, and the Office of
the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Civilian Personnel Policy) (DUSD(CPP)) through the
SDOB or other process.
e. Ensure that the collection, use, and release of personally identifiable information (PII)
about individuals participating in the Civilian Expeditionary Workforce complies with DoDD
5400.11 (Reference (t)) and DoD 5400.11-R (Reference (u)) .
f. Ensure that the collection, use, and disclosure of protected health information (PHI) about
individuals participating in the Civilian Expeditionary Workforce complies with DoD 6025.18-R
(Reference (v)) .
g. Develop guidance and standards to meet the training requirements under this Directive for
the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce and their families, supervisors, military and DoD
civilian personnel, and human resources personnel.
2. DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR READINESS (DUSD(R)) . The
DUSD(R) , under the authority, direction, and control of the USD(P&R) , shall:
a. Ensure that deployment orders recommended for inclusion in the SDOB reflect DoD
civilian employees as a sourcing solution consistent with mission requirements.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
11 ENCLOSURE 2
b. Include the DUSD(CPP) in the USD(P&R) SDOB review process and quarterly Global
Force Management Board deliberations with the Secretary of Defense to ensure the appropriate
utilization of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce in meeting expeditionary requirements.
3. DUSD(CPP) . The DUSD(CPP) , under the authority, direction, and control of the
USD(P&R) , shall:
a. Serve as a member of the Global Force Management Board and Joint Individual
Augmentation Sourcing Board to ensure the maximum utilization of the DoD civilian workforce
for DoD expeditionary requirements.
b. Serve as a member of the U.S. Joint Forces Command and other Joint Staff working
groups to provide advice and maximize utilization of DoD civilian workforce in operational
planning and for service in expeditionary operations.
c. Ensure Combatant Command civilian human resources advisors are appointed, trained,
and prepared to competently advise Combatant Commanders on the maximum utilization of
DoD civilians in operational planning and for service in expeditionary operations.
d. Maintain the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce designations in the Defense Civilian
Human Resources Database and maintain a database of current DoD Civilian Employees who
volunteer to be CBVs. Ensure the data integrity and reliability of these databases so that they
may be used to identify expeditionary sourcing capabilities and functional community
deployment strength.
e. Direct the centralized civilian sourcing and management of the DoD Civilian
Expeditionary Workforce, including DoD civilian employees deployed in support of
expeditionary requirements, to:
(1) Serve as the resource to the Joint Staff (J-3 and J-1) and the U.S. Joint Forces
Command to identify sourcing solutions from within the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce
in coordination with DoD Component representatives, including Functional Community
Managers, during deliberations for force or individual capability requests on Joint Manning
Documents, rotational forces requests, and emergent requests for forces to support expeditionary
operations.
(2) Establish and monitor the Expeditionary Workforce Deployment Index (DI) and
Readiness Index (RI) and recommend mitigating actions to ensure the readiness of the DoD
Civilian Expeditionary Workforce.
(3) Develop and/or identify appropriate training to meet the RI requirements and other
training requirements for families of deployed civilians, supervisors, managers, and employees
under this Directive for the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
12 ENCLOSURE 2
(4) Serve as a principal resource for DoD Components to market and recruit for
expeditionary opportunities, and to assist DoD civilians during preparation for, during, and
following expeditionary service.
(5) Maintain the Capability-Based Former Employee Volunteer Corps database and
ensure the readiness of the Capability-Based Former Employee Volunteer Corps. Former DoD
civilian employees (including retirees) who agree to be part of the Capability-Based Former
Employee Corps will be tracked through the Defense Manpower Data Center.
4. UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (COMPTROLLER) (USD(C)) /CHIEF FINANCIAL
OFFICER (CFO) , DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (USD(C) /DoD CFO) . The USD(C) /DoD
CFO shall:
a. Establish DoD policy and guidance regarding funding for the support and utilization of the
DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce.
b. Ensure each DoD Component establishes policies and procedures so all organizations
within the Component have access to adequate resources to support the additional pay,
allowances, medical requirements, and travel of civilians deploying as part of the DoD Civilian
Expeditionary Workforce.
c. Work with Components to ensure that funds are realigned appropriately for civilian
expeditionary operations.
d. Work with Components to ensure civilian personnel costs are collected and reported as
part of contingency operations.
5. HEADS OF THE DoD COMPONENTS. The Heads of the DoD Components shall:
a. Implement the policies in this Directive.
b. Maintain a subset of their civilian employees (per DoDD 5124.02 (Reference (w))) that is
organized, trained, and equipped in a manner that facilitates the use of their capabilities for
operational requirements away from their normal work locations, or in situations where other
civilians may be evacuated, to be known as the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce.
c. Identify and designate positions as E-E, NCE, and DoD civilian employee volunteers as
CBVs. Ensure employees are provided the opportunity to identify their capabilities that may or
may not be related to their current position to support expeditionary requirements.
d. Plan, program, and budget for Civilian Expeditionary Workforce Requirements.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
13 ENCLOSURE 2
e. Ensure there is an adequate number of trained, cleared, and ready DoD civilian employees
to serve in the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce. Maintain and monitor the Deployment
Index and Readiness Index for their respective DoD Component.
f. Authorize members of the Civilian Expeditionary Workforce to serve validated mission
requirements of the DoD Component.
g. Review all civilian positions in their respective Component at least annually and,
whenever recruitment is initiated, determine the need or continuing need to designate a position
as E-E and NCE.
(1) Alternates should be identified for all positions, vacant or filled, to perform duties of
vacant E-E and NCE positions, and as appropriate, those encumbered E-E and NCE positions in
which the incumbents are unable to perform all of the required duties.
(2) Limit, to the degree practicable, situations where DoD civilian employees must be
directed to perform in E-E and NCE positions on an involuntary or unexpected basis.
h. Ensure personnel of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce within their respective
Component are trained, cleared, and ready to meet relevant expeditionary requirements.
i. Provide specified training as outlined in References (g) , (h) , and (i) and this Directive for
the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce, families of deployed civilians, supervisors,
managers, and employees within their respective DoD Components.
j. Fully support deployed DoD civilian employees and their families prior to deployment,
during deployment, and following deployment assignments. Ensure deployed civilians are
informed of their Human Resource point of contact and have a home station sponsor to assist
them and their families prior to and during deployments.
k. Ensure all force health protection measures in Reference (n) are applied to DoD civilian
employees from their respective Component serving expeditionary requirements. Establish a
system of accountability or mechanism for oversight of the pre- and post-deployment health
assessment requirements.
l. Identify Civilian Human Resource offices and/or personnel with expertise for processing
DoD civilian employees from their respective Component for civilian expeditionary workforce
requirements.
m. Identify and maintain cognizance of the issues and shortfalls expressed by DoD civilian
employees from their respective Component assigned to expeditionary requirements and
undertake remedial actions. Take corrective actions necessary to ensure that the elements of the
DoD Civilian Expeditionary workforce within their respective Components are trained, cleared,
and ready to meet expeditionary requirements.
n. Ensure all appropriate collective bargaining obligations are observed.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
14 ENCLOSURE 2
o. Once authorized by the Secretary of Defense, facilitate matching Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce E-E and NCE members to support DoD expeditionary requirements.
p. At least annually, review the CBV database to ensure it accurately documents the DoD
civilian employee volunteers from their respective Component.
6. CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff shall:
a. Include the DUSD(CPP) in all phases of the Global Force Management process, as
appropriate, to ensure DoD civilians are identified as a sourcing solution, consistent with mission
requirements.
b. Update all Joint Staff relevant publications on the Global Force Management processes to
ensure a Total Force planning effort and that DoD civilian employees are included as a source of
capabilities in the planning and sourcing requirements.
c. Include the DUSD(CPP) on the Joint Manning Validation Boards and in the SDOB
process to ensure that DoD civilian human resources perspectives are considered.
7. COMMANDERS OF THE COMBATANT COMMANDS. The Commanders of the
Combatant Commands, through the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, shall:
a. Establish and communicate DoD civilian expeditionary requirements across the spectrum
of military operations to the DoD Components.
b. Maintain expert civilian human resources and manpower advisors on their staffs for the
purpose of supporting the development of civilian requirements within operational theater plans
and manning documents.
c. Include the Civilian Human Resources Advisor in the Global Force Manning Process and
other planning processes to ensure DoD civilian employees are appropriately included in
sourcing expeditionary requirements.
d. Expeditiously issue theater admission requirements for civilians.
e. Include summaries of civilian work force status in their respective situation reports.
f. Ensure all operational plans, joint manning documents, and individual augmentee
requirements incorporate support by DoD civilian employees to the maximum extent, consistent
with guidance provided by the Combatant Commander Human Resources Advisor.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
15 ENCLOSURE 2
8. COMMANDER, U.S. JOINT FORCES COMMAND (USJFCOM) . The Commander,
USJFCOM, in coordination with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, shall:
a. Ensure, as the Joint Force Provider for the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce, that
DoD civilian employees are identified as a sourcing solution where and when appropriate
consistent with mission requirements.
b. Include the DoD Readiness Unit in all sourcing solution deliberations with Component
representatives.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
16 ENCLOSURE 3
ENCLOSURE 3
AUTOMATION INSTRUCTIONS AND CODING DESCRIPTION
1. Data on E-E, NCE, and CBV employees is reportable as part of the existing requirement for
consolidation of automated civilian personnel records (Reference (r)) .
2. The record field used for collection of this data shall be called “Civilian Expeditionary
Workforce agreement flag.”
3. Overseas Civilian Expeditionary Workforce agreement flag shall be data element number 55
and shall be submitted in position 159 of the automated tape submission sent to the DMDC
quarterly, in accordance with Reference (r) .
4. Data shall be submitted in master and transaction automated files each quarter.
5. Updated overseas Civilian Expeditionary Workforce agreement flag data shall remain
associated with all active individual employee records.
6. Coding description: Reference (r) . DD Forms 2365,2365-1, and 2365-2 will be provided in
the DoDI that will implement this Directive.
TITLE: Civilian Expeditionary Workforce Agreement Flag
Data element number 55 Civilian Expeditionary Workforce agreement flag
Submission position 159 (a one-position numeric field)
CODING DESCRIPTION
1 The employee is in an E-E or NCE position and has signed the position
agreement (DD Form 2365) to remain overseas or to deploy from their
permanent duty station to support combat operations or the availability of
combat-essential systems.
2 The employee is in an E-E or NCE position and has not signed the position
agreement (DD Form 2365) .
3 The employee is assigned as Alternate E-E or NCE and has signed the
position agreement (DD Form 2365) .
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
17 ENCLOSURE 3
CODING DESCRIPTION
4 The employee is assigned as Alternate E-E or NCE and has not signed the
position agreement (DD Form 2365) .
6 The employee, a Capability-Based Volunteer (CBV) , agrees to list his or her
capabilities in a database when there is an expeditionary requirement that may
fall outside or within the scope of assigned positions, or positions for which
they might qualify. They can be contacted and asked to volunteer; DD Form
2365-1 agreement signed.
7 The employee is a capability-based former employee volunteer and has
agreed to be listed in a database as an individual who may be interested in
returning to Federal service as a time-limited employee to serve expeditionary
requirements or who can backfill for those serving other expeditionary
requirements, and has signed DD Form 2365-2.
0 The employee does not occupy an E-E position, nor is the employee a
designated alternate to perform the duties of an E-E position.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
18 GLOSSARY
GLOSSARY
DEFINITIONS
These terms and their definitions are for the purpose of this Directive.
Capability-Based Former Volunteer Corps. Former DoD civilian employees with career status
and reappointment eligibility, or retired DoD civilian employees with eligibility to be appointed
as a reemployed annuitant, who have expressed an interest in being considered for reemployment
on a temporary basis to either respond to an expeditionary requirement or a backfill job
requirement.
capability-based volunteer (CBV) . An employee who may be asked to volunteer for
deployment, to remain behind after other civilians have evacuated, or to backfill other DoD
civilians who have deployed to meet expeditionary requirements in order to ensure that critical
expeditionary requirements that may fall outside or within the scope of an individual’s position
are fulfilled.
contingency operation. A military operation that (a) is designated by the Secretary of Defense as
an operation in which members of the armed forces are or may become involved in military
actions, operations, or hostilities against an enemy of the United States or against an opposing
military force; or (b) results in the call or order to, or retention on, active duty of members of the
uniformed services under section 688,12301(a) ,12302,12304,12406, or chapter 15 of
Reference (e) , or any other provision of law during a war or during a national emergency
declared by the President or Congress.
continuity of operations. The degree or state of being continuous in the conduct of functions,
tasks, or duties necessary to accomplish a military action or mission in carrying out the national
military strategy. It includes the functions and duties of the commander, as well as the
supporting functions and duties performed by the staff and others acting under the authority of
the commander.
deployment. Either temporary reassignment or the requirement to stay in place to support
contingency operations.
deployment index. The percentage of available DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce
positions and DoD civilian employee CBVs within designated career groups as determined by
validated requirements from Combatant Commands and/or other authorities directing DoD
missions and informed by the Functional Community Managers.
direct support. Services provided to participating military activities or armed forces in a military
operation awarded the GWOT Expeditionary Medal or in other similar operations for which a
separate military campaign medal was awarded to military personnel only if the employee
actually enters the designated area of eligibility.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
19 GLOSSARY
DoD civilian employee. An individual meeting the definition of “employee” under section 2105
of title 5, U.S.C., (Reference (x)) as well as employees of DoD Non-Appropriated Fund
Instrumentalities (NAFIs) paid for from Non-Appropriated Funds (NAFs) . This includes DoD
civilian employees filling full-time, part-time, intermittent, or on-call positions. Excludes dual
status National Guard and Reserve Technicians and contractor employees.
DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce. A subset of the DoD civilian workforce that is to be
organized, trained, cleared, and ready in a manner that facilitates the use of their capabilities
either in a temporary reassignment and/or duty status or to stay in place overseas to support the
DoD mission.
DoD Civilian Retired Corps. Retired DoD civilian employees with eligibility to be appointed as
a reemployed annuitant, who have expressed an interest in being considered for reemployment
on a temporary basis to either respond to an expeditionary requirement or a backfill job
requirement.
Emergency-Essential (E-E) . A position-based designation to support the success of combat
operations or the availability of combat-essential systems in accordance with section 1580 of
Reference (e) .
expeditionary. DoD civilians required either to remain at their assigned station after other
civilians have evacuated or to deploy away from their assigned station to fulfill the requirements
resulting from their E-E, NCE, or CBV mission requirements.
Global War on Terror (GWOT) . The type of operational activity that the President or the
Secretary of Defense approve to prevent or respond to life-threatening acts that are a violation of
the criminal laws of the United States or of any State and appear to be intended to intimidate or
coerce a civilian population; to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion;
or to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping.
GWOT Medal. Medal awarded to DoD civilian employees, who, on or after September 11,
2001, to a date to be determined by an authorized official, participate abroad in a GWOT
operation in a location approved for award of the military GWOT Expeditionary Medal or
similar operation for which a separate military GWOT campaign medal was awarded. DoD
civilian employees must be engaged in direct support for 30 consecutive days in an area of
eligibility in a military operation (or the full period when the operation is of less than 30 days
duration) , for 60 non-consecutive days in an area of eligibility provided this support involves the
employee entering the area of eligibility, or, regardless of time, be killed or medically evacuated
from the area of eligibility while providing direct support to the operation. Eligibility criteria for
the GWOT medal are aligned as closely as practicable with the GWOT Expeditionary Medal
criteria awarded to active duty military personnel or other similar military medals awarded for
GWOT-specific campaigns. Under no circumstances are personnel in the United States eligible
for the medal.
Non-Combat Essential (NCE) . A position-based designation to support the expeditionary
requirements in other than combat or combat support situations.
DoDD 1404.10,23 January 2009
20 GLOSSARY
Readiness Index (RI) . The percentage of the DoD Civilian Expeditionary Workforce who have
met the applicable medical, dental, and physical; performance and conduct; initial, annual, and
pre-deployment training; clearance; administrative; and competency requirements.
Secretary of Defense Operations Book (SDOB) . Book prepared by the Joint Staff that briefs the
Secretary of Defense via an established process to obtain approval on proposed orders
authorizing the execution of military operations, directing the attachment of forces, authorizing
supplemental rules of engagement that require Secretary of Defense approval, or modifying
decisions in previously approved orders.
stability operations. An overarching term encompassing various military missions, tasks, and
activities conducted outside the United States in coordination with other instruments of national
power to maintain or reestablish a safe and secure environment, provide essential governmental
services, emergency infrastructure reconstruction, and humanitarian relief.
trained, cleared, and ready. A status of civilian employees who have met all prescribed readiness
requirements. These include, but are not limited to, training, administrative, medical, financial,
and security clearance requirements.
Total Force. The organizations, units, and individuals that comprise the DoD resources for
implementing the National Security Strategy. It includes DoD Active and Reserve Component
military personnel, military retired members, and DoD civilian personnel (including
non-appropriated fund employees) .
U.S. Armed Forces. Defined in section 101(a) (4) of Reference (e) , except that it excludes the
United States Coast Guard for the purpose of this Directive (unless it is operating as a service in
the Navy) .

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